How the Disney classic 'Lady and the Tramp' almost didn't get made

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Lady and the Tramp - DVD Clip No. 1

One of the most iconic animated features in film history, Lady and the Tramp is regarded as an American classic. Released in 1955, it was received positively by audiences everywhere. Today, DoYouRemember looks back at events that almost prevented the film from becoming the cinematic staple of the Disney canon that it is today.

The Classic Spaghetti Scene Was Almost Cut
LADY AND THE TRAMP // Moviestore collection Ltd / Alamy

Walt Disney, upon first viewing the scene, didn't want to include it for various reasons. Luckily, he later changed his mind.

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The Decision to Film in Cinemascope
The Robe
1953 (Photo by Al Greene/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

This meant that the film would be released in a much wider format than it was originally conceived. Already produced scenes had to stretch backgrounds to fill the extra space, and animators struggled to make single characters take up the screen.

Many Theaters Were Not Equipped to Show a Cinemascope Film
So another version of Lady and the Tramp was made with the industry standard ratio.

Trusty's Fate

In the original cut, the character Trusty is killed after the events of the climactic wagon scene. After watching this version, Walt Disney had animators add an injured but otherwise okay Trusty to the following scene, so as not to re-create the classically traumatic Bambi experience.

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The Film Was Initially Panned by Critics
Robert Ebert obit
(Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images)

Critics had issues with the dimensions of the film and the art. They thought the dogs had strange shapes, one stating that the canines had "the dimensions of hippos."

Watch the full Bella Notte Spaghetti Scene below:
Lady and the Tramp - DVD Clip No. 1

And here's the famous Siamese Cat song for those of you that identify as a cat person. Meow.

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