Joseph Gordon-Levitt secretly talked to Edward Snowden to prepare for a movie

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Joseph Gordon-Levitt Talks About Meeting Edward Snowden



In a profile piece on Joseph Gordon-Levitt from The Guardian, the actor revealed that he flew to Russia for a secret meeting with Edward Snowden in preparation for playing the NSA whistle-blower in the upcoming movie "Snowden," directed by Oliver Stone (opening in 2016).

Gordon-Levitt said the motivation behind the meeting was to "understand this person that I was going to play, observing both his strengths and weaknesses," he said.

The two met for four hours and though the actor wanted to tape record the meeting, it was advised that he did not.

In fact, according to piece, Snowden's lawyers didn't want Gordon-Levitt to admit the meeting had taken place.

The actor said that what he took most from the meeting with Snowden was he completely agrees with the actions he took.

"I left knowing without a doubt that what [Snowden] did, he did because he believed it was the right thing to do. That he believed it would help the country he loves," said Gordon-Levitt.

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Joseph Gordon-Levitt secretly talked to Edward Snowden to prepare for a movie
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation employees take down a statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation employees take down a statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation employees take down a statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation employees take down a statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
A statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden is seen at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation employees take down a statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation employees take down a statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation employees take down a statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman points to a covered up statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
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"Now, as he would say, it's not for him to say whether it was right or wrong. That's really for people to decide on their own, and I would encourage anybody to decide that on their own. I don't want to be the actor guy who's like, 'You should listen to me! What he did was right!' I don't think that's my place. Even though that is what I believe — that what he did was right."

"Snowden" is based on Luke Hardin's book "The Snowden Files" and Anatoly Kucherena's "Time of the Octopus."

Along with Gordon-Levitt, the film stars Shailene Woodley as Lindsay Mills, Snowden's girlfriend, Zachary Quinto as Glenn Greenwald, and Melissa Leo as Laura Poitras. Greenwald was the journalist and Poitras the filmmaker Snowden leaked the classified documents to.

Nicolas Cage, Scott Eastwood, and Timothy Olyphant also star.

Gordon-Levitt will next been seen in the Robert Zemeckis film "The Walk," in which he'll be playing another real-life figure, Philippe Petit. The film recounts Petit's infamous tightrope walk across New York City's World Trade Towers in 1974.

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