5 incredible facts about Scott Kelly's nearly year-long space mission

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Five Incredible Facts About Scott Kelly's Nearly Year-Long Space Mission


Astronaut Scott Kelly is currently in the middle of his nearly year-long mission in space. Here are five incredible facts about his time on board the International Space Station.

During the course of his stay, the astronaut's estimated 180 pounds of solid waste will be jettisoned and upon re-entering the atmosphere, burn up in a bright meteoroid-like display. His feces eventually looks like shooting stars.

The number of sunrises and sunsets he's got access to absolutely dwarfs the number we do. Over the course of his mission, most Earthlings will see 684 combined sunrises and sunsets. Scott Kelly is on track to see 10,944.

When thirsty, he often drinks recycled sweat and urine -- around 730 liters in total during the mission. It's unlikely anyone on Earth will do this. But you never know.

During the trip, Kelly will be exercising in excess of 700 hours in order to keep his health up. The strength training is particularly necessary for his heart, muscles and bones.

He is also encountering some massive amounts of radiation during his time in space. In order for someone on Earth to experience the same levels of radiation as the intrepid astronaut, they'd have to fly from New York to Los Angeles a total of 5,250 times. That's an awful lot of reward miles.

See more photos of Scott Kelly in the gallery below:

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5 incredible facts about Scott Kelly's nearly year-long space mission
In this Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015 image made from video provided by NASA, astronauts Scott Kelly, left, and Kjell Lindgren, aboard the International Space Station, speak to actors from the movie "The Martian." On Tuesday, Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko clocked in for their 171st day aboard the International Space Station since arriving on March 27. The two are scheduled to spend 342 days in space. (NASA via AP)
TODAY -- Pictured: (l-r) Mark Kelly and Scott Kelly appear on NBC News' 'Today' show -- (Photo by: Peter Kramer/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz TMA-16M space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station, ISS, blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Saturday, March 28, 2015. The Russian rocket carries U.S. astronaut Scott Kelly, Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka, and Mikhail Korniyenko. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)
BAIKONUR, KAZAKHSTAN - MARCH 28: In this handout provided by NASA, The Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft is seen as it launches to the International Space Station with Expedition 43 NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, Russian Cosmonauts Mikhail Kornienko, and Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) onboard Saturday, March 28, 2015, Kazakh time (March 27 Eastern time) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
BAIKONUR, KAZAKHSTAN - MARCH 28: In this handout provided by NASA, The Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft is seen as it launches to the International Space Station with Expedition 43 NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, Russian Cosmonauts Mikhail Kornienko, and Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) onboard Saturday, March 28, 2015, Kazakh time (March 27 Eastern time) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
Russia's Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft carrying the International Space Station (ISS) crew of US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko blasts off from the launch pad at Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome early on March 28, 2015.  (Photo credit: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
Russia's Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft carrying the International Space Station (ISS) crew of US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko blasts off from the launch pad at Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome early on March 28, 2015. (Photo credit: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
BAIKONUR, KAZAKHSTAN - MARCH 28: In this handout provided by NASA, The Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft is seen as it launches to the International Space Station with Expedition 43 NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, Russian Cosmonauts Mikhail Kornienko, and Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) onboard Saturday, March 28, 2015, Kazakh time (March 27 Eastern time) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
BAIKONUR, KAZAKHSTAN - MARCH 27: In this handout provided by NASA, Expedition 43 Russian Cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), top, NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, center, and Russian Cosmonaut Gennady Padalka of Roscosmos wave farewell as they board the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft ahead of their launch to the International Space Station on March 27, 2015 in Baikonor, Kazakhstan. As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
US astronaut Scott Kelly gestures as his space suit is tested at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome, prior to blasting off to the International Space Station (ISS), late on March 27, 2015. The international crew of US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko is scheduled to blast off to the ISS from Baikonur early on March 28. (Photo credit: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)

(L-R) US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka wave after their space suits were tested at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome late on March 27, 2015. The international crew of US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko is scheduled to blast off to the ISS from Baikonur early on March 28.

(Photo credit: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)

From L: US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko take part in a sending-off ceremony in the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome late on March 27, 2015. The international crew of US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko is scheduled to blast off to the ISS from Baikonur early on March 28, Kazakh time. (Photo credit: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
US astronaut Scott Kelly waves from a bus during a sending-off ceremony in the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome late on March 27, 2015. The international crew of US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko is scheduled to blast off to the ISS from Baikonur early on March 28, Kazakh time. (Photo credit: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
US astronaut Scott Kelly (R) and his brother Mark pose after a press conference at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome on March 26, 2015. Russia's Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft carrying the International Space Station (ISS) crew of US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko is scheduled to blast off to the ISS from Baikonur early on March 28, Kazakh time.  (Photo credit: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
BAIKONUR, KAZAKHSTAN - MARCH 25: The Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft is raised into the vertical position shortly after arriving at the launch pad, Wednesday, March 25, 2015, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, and Russian Cosmonauts Mikhail Kornienko, and Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan March 28, Kazakh time (March 27 Eastern time.) As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)
BAIKONUR, KAZAKHSTAN - MARCH 25: The Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft is rolled out by train to the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, March 25, 2015. NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, and Russian Cosmonauts Mikhail Kornienko, and Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan March 28, Kazakh time (March 27 Eastern time.) As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)
The Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft is mounted on a launch pad at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, on March 25, 2015. Russia's Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft carrying the International Space Station (ISS) crew of US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko is scheduled to blast off to the ISS from Baikonur early on March 28, Kazakh time. (Photo credit: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
The sun rises over a launch pad at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, on March 25, 2015. Russia's Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft carrying the International Space Station (ISS) crew of US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko is scheduled to blast off to the ISS from Baikonur early on March 28, Kazakh time. (Photo credit: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)
TODAY -- Pictured: (l-r) Carson Daly, Natalie Morales, Savannah Guthrie, Matt Lauer, Mark Kelly and Scott Kelly appear on NBC News' 'Today' show -- (Photo by: Peter Kramer/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
U.S. astronaut Scott Kelly, right, crew member of the mission to the International Space Station, ISS, poses through a safety glass with his brother, Mark Kelly, also an astronaut after a news conference in the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Thursday, March 26, 2015. The start of the new Soyuz mission is scheduled on Saturday, March 28.(AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)
Former Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, who was seriously injured in the mass shooting that killed six people in Tucson, Ariz. two years ago, sits with her husband, Mark Kelly, right, a retired astronaut, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, prior to speaking before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on what lawmakers should do to curb gun violence in the wake of last month's shooting rampage at that killed 20 schoolchildren in Newtown, Ct. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
STS-134 commander Mark Kelly, right, talks with his twin brother Scott, left, and mission pilot Greg Johnson, center, after arriving at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, April 26, 2011. Mark Kelly is the husband of wounded Arizona congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords. The space shuttle Endeavour and her crew of six astronauts, is scheduled to lift off Friday afternoon on an 14-day mission to the international space station. Scott Kelly is not a member of the STS-134 crew. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
In this image from NASA television astronaut Terry Virts is seen during the third spacewalk outside the International Space Station Sunday March 1, 2015. (AP Photo/NASA-TV)
In this image from NASA-TV shows the Cygnus cargo spacecraft after it was grappled by the International Space Station's Canadarm Wednesday July 16, 2014 as the pair flew over Kenya. The Cygnus spacecraft is filled with over 3,000 pounds of supplies for the International Space Station in the company's second contracted cargo delivery flight to the space station for NASA. (AP Photo/NASA-TV)
Undated picture shows the international space station "ISS" which will be ready for use in 2025. The German space center DLR reported during a news conference in Berlin Friday, March 2, 2001, that the "ISS" even today offers more space for science than the Russian "MIR" space station ever had. (AP Photo/HO)
In this image taken from video provided by NASA, astronauts Rick Mastracchio, top, and Michael Hopkins work to repair an external cooling line on the International Space Station on Tuesday, Dec. 24, 2013, 260 miles above Earth. The external cooling line — one of two — shut down Dec. 11. The six-man crew had to turn off all nonessential equipment, including experiments. (AP Photo/NASA)

Space Station Over Earth (NASA, International Space Station, 03/07/11)

photo: NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center/Flickr

Sun Over Earth (NASA, International Space Station Science, 11/22/09)

Photo: NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center/Flickr

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