Another case of plague linked to Colorado

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Another Case Of Plague Linked To Colorado


Colorado has been having an unusually active year for the plague, and yet another person who recently visited the state has contracted the rare disease.

Alisha Plescher, a 33-year old teacher from Marquette, Michigan, was diagnosed with the bubonic plague in early September.

She had just returned from a hiking trip near the town of Salida, Colorado when symptoms started to surface.

Doctors pinpointed what was causing her high fever and swollen lymph nodes just in time.

If her visit to the medical facility had come much later, there is a chance the plague would have advanced into an untreatable stage.

Although Plescher is recovering, four lives have been lost to the disease in recent times.

All of the 14 total cases reported since the beginning of the year are believed to have originated in the western United States.

Health officials aren't sure why there has been a sudden increase, but they do know the disease-causing bacteria is spread by a type of flea.

The infected bug travels via rodents and can be plentiful in places like cabins, campsites, and other places that provide ample food and shelter.

See related photos: Sierra Dowling recovered from the plague in 2012
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Another case of plague linked to Colorado
Seven-year-old Sierra Jane Downing, from Pagosa Springs, Colo., watches while her father Sean Downing and mother Darcy Downing talk about her recovery from Bubonic Plague at the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children at Presbyterian/St. Luke's during a news conference Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012, in Denver. It is believed Downing caught the Bubonic Plague from burying a dead squirrel. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey)
Seven-year-old Sierra Jane Downing from Pagosa Springs, Colo., is pushed to a news conference about her recovery from Bubonic Plague by her mother Darcy and father Sean Downing along with nurses at the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children at Presbyterian/St. Luke's Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012, in Denver. It is believed Downing caught the Bubonic Plague from burying a dead squirrel. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey)
Jennifer Snow, MD, pediatric intensivist in the pediatric intensive care unit, center talks to the media about the recovery of seven-year-old Sierra Jane Downing's recovery from Bubonic Plague at the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children at Presbyterian/St. Luke's Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012, in Denver. Tracy butler, MD., left, and Wendi Drummond, MD, pediatric infectious disease specialist, right, look on. It is believed Downing caught the Bubonic Plague from burying a dead squirrel. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey)
Seven-year-old Sierra Jane Downing from Pagosa Springs, Colo., hugs her teddy bear while her father Sean Downing and mother Darcy Downing talk about her recovery from Bubonic Plague at the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children at Presbyterian/St. Luke's during a news conference Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012, in Denver. It is believed Downing caught the Bubonic Plague from burying a dead squirrel. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey)
Seven-year-old Sierra Jane Downing from Pagosa Springs, Colo., looks on while surrounded by the medical staff and parents Sean and Darcy Downing during a news conference talking about her recovery from Bubonic Plague at the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children at Presbyterian/St. Luke's Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012, in Denver. It is believed Downing caught the Bubonic Plague from burying a dead squirrel. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey)
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