An in-depth look at the 9/11 memorial and museum

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9/11 Memorial Museum Opens Its Doors


On September 11, 2001, tragedy struck in both New York City and Washington D.C. In D.C., an American Airlines flight crashed into the Pentagon, and in New York City, two planes flew into the two World Trade Center towers. More than 3,000 people were killed during the attacks in New York City and Washington D.C., including about 400 firefighters and police officers.

While the pain was deep and the cities saw the effects long after that day, New York City made its best effort to rebuild and stand strong as a city. Thus, the 9/11 memorial and museum was born. The museum prides itself on being an educational and historical institution that works on "honoring the victims and examining 9/11 and its continued global significance."

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The memorial in New York City includes two reflecting pools -- one for each tower -- which are each about an acre in size, making them the largest manmade waterfalls in North America. Each pool sits in the footprints of where each of the towers once stood. The memorials also pay tribute to the six people who were killed in the World Trade Center bombing in February 1993.

Architect Michael Arad and landscape architect Peter Walker created the design for the memorial after sifting through submissions for a global design competition that included more than 5,200 entries from 63 different nations.

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Surrounded each reflecting pool, the names of every person who died in both the 2001 and 1993 attacks are inscribed into bronze panels. The panels border the pools, powerfully reminding visitors of the largest loss of life resulting from a foreign attack on American soil. The 9/11 attacks also marked the greatest single loss of rescue personnel in American history.

The 9/11 Memorial Museum focuses on examining the implications and tragedy that came along with the events of 9/11, with an emphasis of documenting the impact of those events. The museum specifically explores the continuing significance and lasting impact of the awful events that occurred on September 11, 2001.

See the gallery below for photos of a 9/11 museum display:

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9/11 Museum and Memorial
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An in-depth look at the 9/11 memorial and museum
An opening panel showing a timeline of events seen during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum at the World Trade Center site May 14, 2014 in New York. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
(Photo: AOL/Lisa Kirshner)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 14: The salvaged tridents from the World Trade Center are viewed during a preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum on May 14, 2014 in New York City. The long awaited museum will open to the public on May 21 following a six-day dedication period for 9/11 families, survivors, first responders ,workers, and local city residents. For the dedication period the doors to the museum will be open for 24-hours a day from May 15 through May 20. On Thursday President Barack Obama and the first lady will attend the dedication ceremony for the opening of the museum. While the construction of the museum has often been fraught with politics and controversy, the exhibitions and displays seek to pay tribute to the 2,983 victims of the 9/11 attacks and the 1993 bombing while also educating the public on the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
(Photo: AOL/Lisa Kirshner)
The remains of Fire Dept. of New York Ladder Company 3's truck are displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)
(Photo: AOL/Lisa Kirshner)
(Photo: AOL/Lisa Kirshner)
(Photo: AOL/Lisa Kirshner)
(Photo: AOL/Lisa Kirshner)
President Barack Obama speaks at the dedication ceremony for the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/John Angelillo, Pool)
President Barack Obama and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg tour the destroyed Ladder 3 truck at the September 11 Memorial Museum,Thursday, May 15, 2014, in New York. Obama spoke at the dedication in New York for the National September 11 Memorial Museum, saying the museum tells the story of 9/11 so that future generations will never forget. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
A New York City firefighter looks at the last column recovered at the World Trade Center site at the dedication ceremony for the National 9/11 Memorial Museum on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. The museum memorializes the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York. (AP Photo/John Angelillo, Pool)
Fragments of the fuselage of Flight 11, that hit the World Trader Center, are displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)
A section of the "slurry wall," a surviving retaining wall of the original World Trade Center at the dedication of the national September 11th Memorial Museum in New York, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Timothy A. Clary, Pool)
The Last Column was the final steel beam ceremonially removed from Ground Zero at the dedication of the national September 11th Memorial Museum in New York, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Timothy A. Clary, Pool)
The Last Column was the final steel beam ceremonially removed from Ground Zero is shown at the dedication of the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/Timothy A. Clary, Pool)
Shoes and personal items on display during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Wednesday, May. 14, 2014 in New York. The museum opens on May 21, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily News, James Keivom, Pool)
New York City Fire Department Firefighter Christian Waugh's helmet he wore on September 11, 2001, are on display during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Wednesday, May. 14, 2014 in New York. The museum opens on May 21, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily News, James Keivom, Pool)
In this photo provided by the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, a special coin given to a CIA operative who played a key role in finding Osma bin Laden, is seen in a case at the museum on Friday, Sept. 5, 2014. The coin joins a fatigue shirt worn by a U.S. Navy SEAL wore in the raid that killed bin Laden. (AP Photo/National September 11 Memorial and Museum, Jin Lee)
In this Sept. 5, 2014 photo provided by the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, the fatigue shirt worn by the U.S. Navy SEAL during the mission to capture Osama bin Laden, is seen in a case at the museum in New York. The shirt joins other items donated to the museum by persons involved with the mission. (AP Photo/National September 11 Memorial and Museum, Jin Lee)
In this Sept. 5, 2014 photo provided by the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, a case containing the fatigue shirt worn by the U.S. Navy SEAL during the mission to capture Osama Bin Laden is seen at the museum in New York. The shirt is among items donated by persons involved with the mission that are part of a new exhibit and will be introduced at the museum on Sunday, Sept. 7. (AP Photo/National September 11 Memorial and Museum, Jin Lee)
In this Sept. 5, 2014 photo provided by the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, a brick from the compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, where bin Laden was captured and killed, is shown behind a glass case at the museum in New York. The brick, a special coin given to a CIA operative who played a key role in finding bin Laden, and a fatigue shirt worn by a U.S. Navy SEAL in the raid where he was killed, are part of a new exhibit that will be introduced at the museum on Sunday, Sept. 7. (AP Photo/National September 11 Memorial and Museum, Jin Lee)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 21: The National 9/11 Flag is viewed at the 9/11 Museum where it is being displayed for the first time on May 21, 2015 in New York City. The National 9/11 Flag, an American flag recovered nearly destroyed from Ground Zero, was restored in 'stitching ceremonies' held across the country. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
A visitor walks past an exhibit at the National September 11 Museum in New York on February 10, 2015. The only Al-Qaeda plotter convicted over the 9/11 attacks has told American lawyers that members of the Saudi royal family donated millions of dollars to the terror group in the 1990s. French citizen Zacarias Moussaoui, dubbed the '20th hijacker,' made the revelations in court papers filed in a New York federal court by lawyers for victims of the attacks who accuse Saudi Arabia of supporting Al-Qaeda. AFP PHOTO/JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Visitors look at an exhibit at the National September 11 Museum in New York on February 10, 2015. The only Al-Qaeda plotter convicted over the 9/11 attacks has told American lawyers that members of the Saudi royal family donated millions of dollars to the terror group in the 1990s. French citizen Zacarias Moussaoui, dubbed the '20th hijacker,' made the revelations in court papers filed in a New York federal court by lawyers for victims of the attacks who accuse Saudi Arabia of supporting Al-Qaeda. AFP PHOTO/JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Visitors look at an exhibit at the National September 11 Museum in New York on February 10, 2015. The only Al-Qaeda plotter convicted over the 9/11 attacks has told American lawyers that members of the Saudi royal family donated millions of dollars to the terror group in the 1990s. French citizen Zacarias Moussaoui, dubbed the '20th hijacker,' made the revelations in court papers filed in a New York federal court by lawyers for victims of the attacks who accuse Saudi Arabia of supporting Al-Qaeda. AFP PHOTO/JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 25: People visit the National 9/11 Memorial Museum in New York, United States on May 25, 2014. The National 9/11 Memorial Museum was opened to the public for the first time on May 21, 2014 and telling the story of 9/11 through multimedia displays, archives, narratives and a collection of monumental and authentic artifacts. (Photo by Cem Ozdel/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 25: People visit the National 9/11 Memorial Museum in New York, United States on May 25, 2014. The National 9/11 Memorial Museum was opened to the public for the first time on May 21, 2014 and telling the story of 9/11 through multimedia displays, archives, narratives and a collection of monumental and authentic artifacts. (Photo by Cem Ozdel/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 15: A helmet worn by New York City Fire Department Captain Patrick John Brown on September 11, 2001 is displayed during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum at ground zero May 15, 2014 in New York City. The museum spans seven stories, mostly underground, and contains artifacts from the attack on the World Trade Center Towers on September 11, 2001 that include the 80-foot high tridents, the so-called 'Ground Zero Cross,' the destroyed remains of Company 21's New York Fire Department Engine as well as smaller items such as letter that fell from a hijacked plane and posters of missing loved ones projected onto the wall of the museum. The museum will open to the public on May 21. (Photo by James Keivom-Pool/Getty Images)
Remains of a New York City Fire Department Ladder Company 3 truck seen during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum at the World Trade Center site May 14, 2014 in New York. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
A sign in an exhibit about the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks, seen during a press preview in the National September 11 Memorial Museum at the World Trade Center site May 14, 2014 in New York. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 14: Cards, patches and mementos of those killed at Ground Zero are are viewed during a preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum on May 14, 2014 in New York City. The long awaited museum will open to the public on May 21 following a six-day dedication period for 9/11 families, survivors, first responders, workers, and local city residents. For the dedication period the doors to the museum will be open for 24-hours a day from May 15 through May 20. On Thursday President Barack Obama and the first lady will attend the dedication ceremony for the opening of the museum. While the construction of the museum has often been fraught with politics and controversy, the exhibitions and displays seek to pay tribute to the 2,983 victims of the 9/11 attacks and the 1993 bombing while also educating the public on the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
An American flag found at the World Trade Center site (below) and a photograph of a flag raising at the site by Thomas E. Franklin/The Record (Bergen County, New Jersey) (top), seen during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum at the World Trade Center site May 14, 2014 in New York. 'MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION' AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
An exhibit about the September 11, 2001 attack on the Pentagon, seen during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum at the World Trade Center site May 14, 2014 in New York. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 14: People tour the National September 11 Memorial Museum on May 14, 2014 in New York City. The long awaited museum will open to the public on May 21 following a six-day dedication period for 9/11 families, survivors, first responders, workers, and local city residents. For the dedication period the doors to the museum will be open for 24-hours a day from May 15 through May 20. On Thursday President Barack Obama and the first lady will attend the dedication ceremony for the opening of the museum. While the construction of the museum has often been fraught with politics and controversy, the exhibitions and displays seek to pay tribute to the 2,983 victims of the 9/11 attacks and the 1993 bombing while also educating the public on the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
A New York Fire Department ambulance, is seen during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum at the World Trade Center site May 14, 2014 in New York. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
(Photo: AOL/Lisa Kirshner)
Joe Daniels, left, President And CEO of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, gives Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott a tour of the memorial, Tuesday, June 10, 2014 in New York. Abbott will be in Washington on Thursday to meet with President Barack Obama. (AP Photo/National September 11 Memorial & Museum, Amy Dreher)
Participants pause after The National 9/11 Flag was folded and made ready to be walked to the nearby 9/11 Memorial Museum after a ceremony at the 9/11 Memorial in New York Wednesday, May 21, 2014. Today marked the first day the 9/11 Memorial Museum was opened to the public. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
NEW YORK CITY, NY - SEPTEMBER 11: A photo of a victim of 9/11 terrorist attacks and red roses are seen on the September 11 memorial in New York, United States, on September 11, 2014. After the remembrance ceremony held for the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, September 11 memorial and 9/11 museum reopened to visit in New York. (Photo by Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
FILE - In this May 6, 2014, file photo, 3 World Trade Center, upper right, is located at the World Trade Center in New York. At its monthly meeting Wednesday, May 28, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey postponed a decision on whether to approve more than $1 billion in financing for Silverstein Properties' retail and office tower, 3 World Trade Center. Next to the private office building are the transportation hub, upper left, the National September 11 Memorial Museum, left, and a reflecting pool, bottom.(AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
While Naval officers Lt. Zachary Dryden, second from right, and Lt. Christopher Mikell, far right, wait their turn, Navy Chief Troy Please, far left, and Senior Navy Chief Brandon Bower, center, attach new rank lapels for Lt. Andrew Miller, second from left, after his promotion during a joint U.S. military services re-enlistment and promotion ceremony, Friday May 23, 2014 at the National September 11 Memorial Museum site in New York. The officers, all onboard the U.S.S. Oakland based in Norfolk, Va., are in the city as part of Fleet Week New York, a weeklong celebration of America’s sea services. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
A view of the National September 11 Memorial Museum with the north reflecting pool in foreground during the museum's dedication ceremony Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/JUSTIN LANE, Pool)
(Photo: AOL/Lisa Kirshner)
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