NASA spots plasma tornado on sun's surface

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NASA Spots Plasma Tornado On Sun's Surface


NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory recently spotted a plasma tornado spinning just above the sun's surface, and the volatile winds held strong for roughly 40 hours.

An online post by NASA described the resilience of the tornado, noting the plasma mass, "was stretched and pulled back and forth by powerful magnetic forces but [was] not ripped apart in this sequence."

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NASA spots plasma tornado on sun's surface
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Between September 1st through the 3rd, the storm is estimated to have reached heights in excess of 40,000 miles, which is around 5 times the Earth's diameter.

According to NASA, "The temperature of the ionized iron particles observed in this extreme ultraviolet wavelength of light was about 2.8 million degrees C. (or 5 million degrees F.)"

Similar tornadoes have been observed in the past, with one reaching speeds up to 186,000 miles per hour.
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