Rare pink dolphin spotted in Louisiana 8 years after first appearance

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Rare Pink Dolphin Spotted in Louisiana

The very first time a pink baby dolphin was spotted in a Louisiana river was in 2007. The same dolphin came back eight years later as an adult, and according to the boat captain that saw her, she might be pregnant.



While you can spot pink river dolphins in the Amazon and Orinoco rivers across Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru and Venezuela, the one spotted in Louisiana is actually an albino bottlenose dolphin, which makes her a very rare animal.

Check out this gallery on military dolphins:

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Rare pink dolphin spotted in Louisiana 8 years after first appearance
LA SPEZIA, ITALY - DATE UNSPECIFIED: Collect picture of Marine Mammal System dolphin marking a practice mine tethered in the water column, for relocation and investigation by human divers. Gliding through the water to locate mines, handcuff terrorists and take part in surveillance these amazing animals are the real Navy Seals. Incredible pictures capture one of the latest military demonstrations showing how sea lions and other marine mammals are being trained and used in modern warfare - juts like combat dogs on land. Super-skilled Gremlin, a Californian sea lion, showcased his incredible abilities at a US Navy demonstration watched by officials at the NATO underwater research centre in the bay at La Spezia, Italy, on October 23. Handlers from the US Navy's Space and Naval Warfae Systems Center Pacific (SSC Pacific), based in San Diego, CA., showed onlookers what the underwater animal expert can do. The mammals are chosen because of their natural tolerance to cold, low light underwater vision, and ability to dive deep without getting the bends. (Photo by United States Navy / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
LA SPEZIA, ITALY - DATE UNSPECIFIED: Collect picture of a Marine Mammal System dolphin marking a practice mine tethered in the water column, for relocation and investigation by human divers. Gliding through the water to locate mines, handcuff terrorists and take part in surveillance these amazing animals are the real Navy Seals. Incredible pictures capture one of the latest military demonstrations showing how sea lions and other marine mammals are being trained and used in modern warfare - juts like combat dogs on land. Super-skilled Gremlin, a Californian sea lion, showcased his incredible abilities at a US Navy demonstration watched by officials at the NATO underwater research centre in the bay at La Spezia, Italy, on October 23. Handlers from the US Navy's Space and Naval Warfae Systems Center Pacific (SSC Pacific), based in San Diego, CA., showed onlookers what the underwater animal expert can do. The mammals are chosen because of their natural tolerance to cold, low light underwater vision, and ability to dive deep without getting the bends. (Photo by United States Navy/Barcroft Media/Getty Images)
A US Navy trained dolphin named Ten, seen above, discovered a 1800's era torpedo in San Diego Bay. (Photo by Don Bartletti/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
GULFPORT, MI - SEPTEMBER 17: In this handout photo provided by the U.S. Navy, Ens. Michael Dobling (L) and Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Philip Myers greet one of four Atlantic Bottlenose Dolphins displaced when hurricane Katrina destroyed their home at the 'Marine Life Oceanarium' September 17, 2005 in Gulfport, Mississippi. The aboveground pool, along with other necessary filtration equipment needed to care for sea mammals, was provided by U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program personnel from San Diego, California. Kelly has spent the last two and a half weeks in the Gulf of Mexico with seven other dolphins, swept out to sea by a wave reported to be forty feet high during Hurricane Katrina. Because these dolphins are from a captive facility, they do not forage for food or necessarily have the survival skills needed to avoid predators or boat traffic. Since they were spotted off the gulf coast on September 10, Marine Life Aquarium trainers and National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries Service biologists have been feeding the dolphins several times a day. (Photo by Chris Gethings/U.S. Navy via Getty Images)
AT SEA: In this handout photo from the U.S. Navy, Sergeant Andrew Garrett watches K-Dog, a bottlenose dolphin attached to Commander Task Unit 55.4.3, leap out of the water while training near the USS Gunston Hall March 18, 2003 in the Persian Gulf. Commander Task Unit 55.4.3 is a multinational team from the U.S., Great Britain and Australia conducting deep and shallow water mine clearing operations to clear shipping lanes for humanitarian relief and are currently conducting missions in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. (Photo by U.S. Navy/Getty Images)
387020 01: Petty Officer 2nd Class Stephen Palmer of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Team 3 (EOD Team 3) gives Hapa, a half Atlantic, half Pacific bottle nose dolphin, used for shallow water mine countermeasures, a snack aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Duluth (LPD 6) during Exercise Kernel Blitz 2001, March 21, 2001. Kernel Blitz is a large-scale amphibious landing exercise taking place in the vicinity of Camp Pendleton, Calif. (U.S. Navy photo by Gregory Messier/Newsmakers)
In this Friday, Jan. 9, 2015, photo, Brandon Dodson reaches out to shake the pectoral fins of Flagler the dolphin at Dolphin Research Center in Marathon, Fla. The interactive experience with the dolphins was a facet of Soldier Ride, which has 60 vets -- most suffering severe injuries from wars in Iraq and Afghanistan -- biking segments of the Florida Keys Overseas Highway. The event is staged by the Wounded Warrior Project to help restore injured soldiers' physical and emotional well-being. It concludes in Key West Sunday, Jan. 11. (AP Photo/Andy Newman)
Employees of the Sevastopol State Oceanarium train dolphins, in Sevastopol, Crimea, Sunday, March 30, 2014. A Soviet-era military program training dolphins and seals for combat will be revived in Crimea after its annexation by Russia, according to Russian state media. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)
Employees of the Sevastopol State Oceanarium train dolphins, in Sevastopol, Crimea, Sunday, March 30, 2014. A Soviet-era military program training dolphins and seals for combat will be revived in Crimea after its annexation by Russia, according to Russian state media. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)
U.S. Navy dolphin "Ten" opens his mouth as he's loaded into a sling during a demonstration held at the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program facility at Naval Base Point Loma in San Diego, Thursday, April, 12, 2007. The facility houses and trains about 75 dolphins and 25 sea lions which the Navy uses for mine detection and force protection. (AP Photo/Denis Poroy)
A dolphin jumps onto a boat while participating in a anti-terrorism training exercise Tuesday, May 18, 2010, in San Francisco. The specially trained Navy Marine Mammals, based in San Diego, stole the show in a day of anti-terrorism training exercises held at ports throughout California. (AP Photo/Lacy Atkins, Pool)
U.S. Navy lieutenant John Jang, dolphin trainer, plays with a dolphin near Klaipeda, Lithuania Tuesday, July 14, 1998. The dolphin with another four dolphins, specially trained by the U.S. to find mines, will take part in the military exercise Baltic Challenge '98. The military exercise will start on July 16 in Lithuania with nearly 5,000 military personnel from 11 countries taking part in it. The Baltic Challenge '98 that involves peacekeeping training and support in maritime, air and ground operations, is largest of this kind in Europe in 1998. (AP Photo/Mindaugas Kulbis)
** ADVANCE FOR THE WEEKEND, MAY 13-15 ** Dolphins swim next to the USS Nitze March 15, 2006, off Morehead City, N.C., during a sonar demonstration for North Carolina state environmental and fisheries officials. A 500-square-mile block of sea the U.S. Navy wants for an underwater sub-hunting range is coveted by offshore fishermen, and some are certain construction of a Navy sonar range will both destroy the coral bottom that attracts fish and worried the sonar itself will drive fish away. (AP Photo/Chuck Beckley)
In this image from video a U.S. Navy mine-detecting dolphin does a flip in the air while working in the waters near the Port of Umm Qasr, Iraq, Friday, March 28, 2003. The Navy used trained dolphins to help locate possible mines, clearing the port for the British Royal Navy relief ship, The Sir Galahad, to enter the port to deliver humanitarian aid cargo for distribution to Iraqi citizens. (AP Photo/Pool via APTN)
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