California's climate fight comes down to late negotiations

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CA Gov. Jerry Brown Announces Mandatory Water Cutbacks

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gov. Jerry Brown has made climate change the centerpiece of his final tenure by laying out the most aggressive benchmark in North America, which would reduce California's carbon footprint and boost the state's renewable energy use to 50 percent in 15 years.

Securing legislation requiring that standard in the world's eighth-largest economy would be a timely win for Brown before international leaders meet in Paris in November for the United Nations climate change conference. Brown is likely to attend the conference, but he has not said so officially.

But first, the Democratic governor has to break through a logjam in his own party in the final week of the legislative session.

Many Assembly Democrats — including moderates and those representing less wealthy districts — are concerned that the ambitious proposal to cut petroleum use by half, boost renewable electricity use to 50 percent and double energy efficiency in existing buildings will hurt California's economy and working-class residents.

An oil industry-funded group, the California Driver's Alliance, is running what climate law proponents call "fear-mongering" ads suggesting the bill will raise gas prices and even result in rationing, harkening back to gas lines during the oil crisis of the 1970s.

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California drought aerial images
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California's climate fight comes down to late negotiations
RANCHO SANTA FE, CA - APRIL 04: Aerial view overlooking landscaping on April 4, 2015 in Rancho Santa Fe, California. Gov. Jerry Brown has demanded a 25 percent cut in urban water useage due to a severe drought affecting much of California and the West. Everyone from Campuses, golf courses and other industrial and recreational facilities, as well as personal, home useage are specifically targeted.(Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
SAN DIEGO, CA - APRIL 04: Aerial view overlooking landscaping on April 4, 2015 in San Diego, California. Gov. Jerry Brown has demanded a 25 percent cut in urban water useage due to a severe drought affecting much of California and the West. Everyone from Campuses, golf courses and other industrial and recreational facilities, as well as personal, home useage are specifically targeted.(Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
RAMONA, CA-APRIL 4TH: Aerial view overlooking landscaping on April 4, 2015 in Ramona, California. Gov. Jerry Brown has demanded a 25 percent cut in urban water useage due to a severe drought affecting much of California and the West. Everyone from Campuses, golf courses and other industrial and recreational facilities, as well as personal, home useage are specifically targeted.(Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
SAN DIEGO, CA - APRIL 04: Aerial view overlooking landscaping on April 4, 2015 in San Diego, California. Gov. Jerry Brown has demanded a 25 percent cut in urban water useage due to a severe drought affecting much of California and the West. Everyone from Campuses, golf courses and other industrial and recreational facilities, as well as personal, home useage are specifically targeted.(Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
CARLSBAD, CA-APRIL 4TH: Aerial view overlooking landscaping on April 4, 2015 in Carlsbad, California. Gov. Jerry Brown has demanded a 25 percent cut in urban water useage due to a severe drought affecting much of California and the West. Everyone from Campuses, golf courses and other industrial and recreational facilities, as well as personal, home useage are specifically targeted.(Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
SAN DIEGO, CA - APRIL 04: Aerial view overlooking landscaping on April 4, 2015 in San Diego, California. Gov. Jerry Brown has demanded a 25 percent cut in urban water useage due to a severe drought affecting much of California and the West. Everyone from Campuses, golf courses and other industrial and recreational facilities, as well as personal, home useage are specifically targeted.(Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
SAN DIEGO, CA - APRIL 04: Aerial view overlooking landscaping on April 4, 2015 in San Diego, California. Gov. Jerry Brown has demanded a 25 percent cut in urban water useage due to a severe drought affecting much of California and the West. Everyone from Campuses, golf courses and other industrial and recreational facilities, as well as personal, home useage are specifically targeted.(Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
RANCHO SANTA FE, CA - APRIL 04: Aerial view overlooking landscaping on April 4, 2015 in Rancho Santa Fe, California. Gov. Jerry Brown has demanded a 25 percent cut in urban water useage due to a severe drought affecting much of California and the West. Everyone from Campuses, golf courses and other industrial and recreational facilities, as well as personal, home useage are specifically targeted.(Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
RANCHO SANTA FE, CA - APRIL 04: Aerial view overlooking landscaping on April 4, 2015 in Rancho Santa Fe, California. Gov. Jerry Brown has demanded a 25 percent cut in urban water useage due to a severe drought affecting much of California and the West. Everyone from Campuses, golf courses and other industrial and recreational facilities, as well as personal, home useage are specifically targeted.(Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
RANCHO SANTA FE, CA - APRIL 04: Aerial view overlooking landscaping on April 4, 2015 in Rancho Santa Fe, California. Gov. Jerry Brown has demanded a 25 percent cut in urban water useage due to a severe drought affecting much of California and the West. Everyone from Campuses, golf courses and other industrial and recreational facilities, as well as personal, home useage are specifically targeted.(Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
SAN DIEGO, CA - APRIL 04: Aerial view overlooking landscaping on April 4, 2015 in San Diego, California. Gov. Jerry Brown has demanded a 25 percent cut in urban water useage due to a severe drought affecting much of California and the West. Everyone from Campuses, golf courses and other industrial and recreational facilities, as well as personal, home useage are specifically targeted.(Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
SAN DIEGO, CA - APRIL 04: Aerial view overlooking landscaping on April 4, 2015 in San Diego, California. Gov. Jerry Brown has demanded a 25 percent cut in urban water useage due to a severe drought affecting much of California and the West. Everyone from Campuses, golf courses and other industrial and recreational facilities, as well as personal, home useage are specifically targeted.(Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
RANCHO SANTA FE, CA - APRIL 04: Aerial view overlooking landscaping on April 4, 2015 in Rancho Santa Fe, California. Gov. Jerry Brown has demanded a 25 percent cut in urban water useage due to a severe drought affecting much of California and the West. Everyone from Campuses, golf courses and other industrial and recreational facilities, as well as personal, home useage are specifically targeted.(Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
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Lobbying has intensified on both fronts. Billionaire environmental activist Tom Steyer and Oscar-winning actress Halle Berry are making personal appeals urging undecided lawmakers to vote for the bill. They are joined by President Barack Obama, California U.S. Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer and a long list of fellow Democrats.

So far, the Brown administration and legislative leaders have shared little publicly as backroom negotiations come down to Friday's deadline to consider bills.

"I think the historic weight of this measure is starting to be felt," said Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, during a press conference Tuesday with local bishops, who cited Pope Francis' encyclical on the environment as a call to action.

"I think at the end of the day that many members on the Assembly side will clearly look at the short- and long-term implications of health and to the economy of California and will do the right thing," said de Leon, who is carrying Brown's proposal.

Californians share Brown's environmental concerns and a majority supports his call for tougher standards. A July poll by the Public Policy Institute of California found 79 percent of residents agree global warming is either a very serious or somewhat serious threat to quality of life.

One of the main sticking points for lawmakers reluctant to tighten climate change rules concerns the California Air Resources Board, an unelected body with broad power to set vehicle emissions and fuel standards to decide how the state will reduce oil use.

Some moderate Democrats want the Legislature to approve board regulations, but de Leon has said he is unwilling to strip the agency's power. Sen. Fran Pavley, D-Agoura Hills, who is carrying a companion bill to extend California's current emission-reduction targets to 2050, said she would add a requirement for the board to conduct a cost-benefit analysis of policies for lawmakers to review.

Another major point of contention is the mandate to cut gasoline use by 50 percent. The oil industry views it as a direct attack on its business, and it is fighting back through ads and lobbying in the Capitol. Assemblyman Henry Perea, D-Fresno, whose district is dominated by oil and agriculture, has been the most visible moderate. He has suggested scaling back the petroleum mandate.

Supporters say it's possible to reduce emissions by increasing fuel efficiency standards, adding thousands of electric vehicles and adding solar and wind to the electricity grid. They say the push to use advanced technology will create a new economy of clean energy, good-paying jobs.

Still, lawmakers worry about the practical effects on residents.

Assemblyman Jim Cooper, D-Elk Grove, said when actress Berry spent a recent morning lobbying lawmakers, he told her he was undecided because solar panels and electric vehicles have largely benefited wealthier communities.

"I like the bill, I think it's good. My kids have asthma. But my frustration is the amendments are coming in the last nine days of session and we haven't even seen them yet," Cooper said. "I just want to make sure the middle-class and poor people aren't left out."

Complicating climate change talks in Sacramento are a pair of special legislative sessions to figure out how to pay for California's transportation infrastructure and state-funded health care. Lawmakers also have hundreds of bills to tackle in the final hours of the legislative session.

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Celebrity Drought Shaming, California drought
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California's climate fight comes down to late negotiations

Kim Kardashian and Kanye West's home.

(Photo by John Chapple/Splash News)

Khloe Kardashian's home.

(Photo by John Chapple/Splash News)

Cher's home.

(Photo by John Chapple/Splash News)

"I felt so guilty taking a bath last night due to the drought that I am now using the water for anything I can! If you are a Californian I hope you are doing what ever you can to conserve our water! Ps I'm not an alien the water is green because of my bubble bath! 💚"

(Photo by kellyosbourne via Instagram)

"Here's a little #droughtshaming in Brentwood to start your Thursday. 👎"

(Photo by Turf Terminators via Twitter)

"@SanDiego6 Doriana apartments #droughtshaming been on 10 min"

(Photo by PAULFIERCE via Twitter)

In this April 3, 2015 aerial file photo, lush green golf courses border the edge of the desert in Palm Springs, Calif. Pressed by the fourth year of bone-dry weather and the threat of state-mandated water cuts, some of the poshest courses in California are ceding back to nature some of their manicured green, installing high-tech moisture monitoring systems and letting the turf they don't rip up turn just a little bit brown. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)
Homes with swimming pools border the desert of this neighborhood Friday, April 3, 2015, in Cathedral City, Calif. California Gov. Jerry Brown ordered officials Wednesday to impose statewide mandatory water restrictions for the first time in history as surveyors found the lowest snow level in the Sierra Nevada snowpack in 65 years of record-keeping. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
In this aerial photo taken Tuesday, April 28, 2015, a spillway sits more than a 100 yards away from the water level of Lake McClure in Mariposa County Northeast of Merced, Calif. The State Water Resources Control Board is considering sweeping mandatory emergency regulations to protect water supplies as water levels at some of California's lakes and reservoirs continue to decline.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
Cy Bodden from the San Diego company LawnLift sprays their Grass Paint product to enhance the green color as water restrictions take their toll during a severe drought in San Diego and California on May 12, 2015. California recently announced sweeping statewide water restrictions for the first time in history to combat the region's devastating drought, the worst since records began. AFP PHOTO/ MARK RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
A home with a swimming pool sits near hillside, Thursday April 2, 2015, in Altadena, Calif. California Gov Jerry Brown on Wednesday, April 1, ordered a mandatory 25 percent overall cutback in water use by cities and towns, but not farms, in the most sweeping drought measure in history by the United States’ largest state economy. The water crackdown comes as California moves toward its fourth summer of drought after record low winter snowfall, leaving the state with a year’s worth of water stored in its reservoirs, and dwindling groundwater for wells. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)
A water holding pond at the Orange County Water District, recharge facility is filled to less then 20 percent of it's capacity, Wednesday, May 6, 2015 in Anaheim, Calif. The State Water Resources Control Board approved new restrictions Tuesday that include a mandatory target for each local water agency to reduce consumption. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
This Sunday, April 19, 2015 photo shows Kris Widger mountain biking through dry vegetation in the Santa Monica Mountains in the Topanga area of Los Angeles. Riders are finding trails cracked, dusty and grasses much drier than usual because of the drought. (AP Photo/Brian Melley)
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