Father of drowned Syrian toddlers prepares to take bodies home

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Father of Drowned Syrian Toddlers to Return to Kobani

MUGLA, Turkey The distraught father of two Syrian toddlers who drowned with their mother and several other migrants as they tried to reach Greece identified their bodies on Thursday and prepared to take them back to their home town of Kobani.

Abdullah Kurdi collapsed in tears after emerging from a morgue in the city of Mugla near Bodrum, where the body of his 3-year-old son, Aylan, washed up on Wednesday.

A photograph of the boy's tiny body in a bright red T-shirt and dark shorts, face-down in the surf, appeared in newspapers around the world, prompting sympathy and outrage at the perceived inaction of developed nations in helping refugees.

WARNING: The following slideshow contains graphic images

19 PHOTOS
Aylan Kurdi, Syrian migrant boy who drowned
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Father of drowned Syrian toddlers prepares to take bodies home
This handout photo courtesy of Tima Kurdi shows a photo of Aylan Kurdi, left, and his brother Galib Kurdi. The body of 3-year-old Syrian Alan Kurdi was found on a Turkish beach after the small rubber boat he, his 5-year old brother Galib and their mother, Rehan, were in capsized during a desperate voyage from Turkey to Greece. The family stated that the spelling of the boys’ names had been changed by Turkish authorities to Aylan and Galip, but were in fact spelled as Alan and Galib. (Photo courtesy of Tima Kurdi /The Canadian Press via AP) 
This handout photo courtesy of Tima Kurdi shows a photo of Alan Kurdi. The body of 3-year-old Syrian Alan Kurdi was found on a Turkish beach after the small rubber boat he, his 5-year old brother Galib and their mother, Rehan, were in capsized during a desperate voyage from Turkey to Greece. The family stated that the spelling of the boys’ names had been changed by Turkish authorities to Aylan and Galip, but were in fact spelled as Alan and Galib. (Photo courtesy of Tima Kurdi /The Canadian Press via AP) 
Abdullah Kurdi, 40, right, father of Syrian boys Aylan, 3, and Galip, 5, who were washed up drowned on a beach near Turkish resort of Bodrum on Wednesday, speaks to the media as he waits for the delivery of their bodies outside a morgue in Mugla, Turkey, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015.(AP Photo/Mehmet Can Meral)
Abdullah Kurdi, 40, father of Syrian boys Aylan, 3, and Galip, 5, who were washed up drowned on a beach near Turkish resort of Bodrum on Wednesday, waits for the delivery of their bodies outside a morgue in Mugla, Turkey, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. Images of Aylan’s body on the beach, have heightened global attention to a wave of migration, driven by war and deprivation, that is unparalleled since World War II. (Tolga Adanali/Depo Photos via AP)
WARNING: This gallery contains graphic content. Viewer discretion is advised. 
A paramilitary police officer carries the lifeless body of a migrant child after a number of migrants died and a smaller number were reported missing after boats carrying them to the Greek island of Kos capsized, near the Turkish resort of Bodrum early Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015. (AP Photo/DHA) TURKEY OUT
A migrant child's dead body lies on the shores in Bodrum, southern Turkey, on September 2, 2015 after a boat carrying refugees sank while reaching the Greek island of Kos. Thousands of refugees and migrants arrived in Athens on September 2, as Greek ministers held talks on the crisis, with Europe struggling to cope with the huge influx fleeing war and repression in the Middle East and Africa. AFP PHOTO / Nilufer Demir / DOGAN NEWS AGENCY (Photo credit should read Nilufer Demir/AFP/Getty Images)
Tima Kurdi, touches a photo of her nephews Alan and Galib Kurdi while speaking to the media outside her home in Coquitlam, B.C., Canada, on Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. The body of 3-year-old Syrian Alan Kurdi was found on a Turkish beach after the small rubber boat he, his 5-year old brother Galib and their mother, Rehan, were in capsized during a desperate voyage from Turkey to Greece. The family stated that the spelling of the boys’ names had been changed by Turkish authorities to Aylan and Galip, but were in fact spelled as Alan and Galib. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP) 
This handout photo courtesy of Tima Kurdi shows a photo of her three-year-old nephew Alan Kurdi on her phone during an interview at her home in Coquitlam, B.C., Canada, on Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. The body of 3-year-old Syrian Alan Kurdi was found on a Turkish beach after the small rubber boat he, his 5-year old brother Galib and their mother, Rehan, were in capsized during a desperate voyage from Turkey to Greece. The family stated that the spelling of the boys’ names had been changed by Turkish authorities to Aylan and Galip, but were in fact spelled as Alan and Galib. (Photo courtesy of Tima Kurdi /The Canadian Press via AP)
This handout photo courtesy of Tima Kurdi shows Alan Kurdi, left, and his brother Galib Kurdi. The body of 3-year-old Syrian Alan Kurdi was found on a Turkish beach after the small rubber boat he, his 5-year old brother Galib and their mother, Rehan, were in capsized during a desperate voyage from Turkey to Greece. The family stated that the spelling of the boys’ names had been changed by Turkish authorities to Aylan and Galip, but were in fact spelled as Alan and Galib. (Photo courtesy of Tima Kurdi /The Canadian Press via AP) 
Abdullah Kurdi, 40, father of Syrian boys Aylan, 3, and Galip, 5, who were washed up drowned on a beach near Turkish resort of Bodrum on Wednesday, waits for the delivery of their bodies outside a morgue in Mugla, Turkey, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. Images of Aylan’s body on the beach, have heightened global attention to a wave of migration, driven by war and deprivation, that is unparalleled since World War II. (Tolga Adanali/Depo Photos via AP)
Tima Kurdi is overcome with emotion as she looks at photos of her late nephews Alan and Galib Kurdi, at her home in Coquitlam, B.C., Canada, on Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. The body of 3-year-old Syrian Alan Kurdi was found on a Turkish beach after the small rubber boat he, his 5-year old brother Galib and their mother, Rehan, were in capsized during a desperate voyage from Turkey to Greece. The family stated that the spelling of the boys’ names had been changed by Turkish authorities to Aylan and Galip, but were in fact spelled as Alan and Galib. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP)
Tima Kurdi shows a photo of her three-year-old nephew Alan Kurdi on her phone during an interview at her home in Coquitlam, B.C., Canada, on Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. The body of 3-year-old Syrian Alan Kurdi was found on a Turkish beach after the small rubber boat he, his 5-year old brother Galib and their mother, Rehan, were in capsized during a desperate voyage from Turkey to Greece. The family stated that the spelling of the boys’ names had been changed by Turkish authorities to Aylan and Galip, but were in fact spelled as Alan and Galib. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP) 
Abdullah Kurdi, 40, father of Syrian boys Aylan, 3, and Galip, 5, who were washed up drowned on a beach near Turkish resort of Bodrum on Wednesday, cries as he waits for the delivery of their bodies outside a morgue in Mugla, Turkey, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015.(AP Photo/Mehmet Can Meral)
Tima Kurdi is comforted by friend Hoba Said as she is overcome with emotion as she looks at photos of her late nephews Alan and Galib Kurdi, at her home in Coquitlam, B.C., Canada, on Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. The body of 3-year-old Syrian Alan Kurdi was found on a Turkish beach after the small rubber boat he, his 5-year old brother Galib and their mother, Rehan, were in capsized during a desperate voyage from Turkey to Greece. The family stated that the spelling of the boys’ names had been changed by Turkish authorities to Aylan and Galip, but were in fact spelled as Alan and Galib. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP)
Officials carry the coffin of Rehan Kurdi, the mother of Syrian boys Aylan, 3, and Galip, 5, who were washed up drowned on a beach near Turkish resort of Bodrum on Wednesday, from a morgue to a funeral car in Mugla, Turkey, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. Images of Aylan’s body on the beach, have heightened global attention to a wave of migration, driven by war and deprivation, that is unparalleled since World War II. (AP Photos/Emrah Gurel)
Men load onto a funeral vehicle the coffins of migrants and three-year old Aylan Kurdi, a Syrian boy whose body was washed up on a Turkish beach after a boat carrying refugees sank as it crossed to the Greek island of Kos, at the morgue in Mugla, southern Turkey, on September 3, 2015. The father of a three-year-old Syrian boy whose body was washed up on a Turkish beach, an image that shocked the world, said on September 3 his children 'slipped through my hands' as their boat was taking in water en route to Greece. Abdullah, whose surname is given by Turkish media as Kurdi but sources in Syria say is actually called Shenu, lost his three-year-old son Aylan, four-year-old son Ghaleb and wife Rihana in the tragedy. AFP PHOTO / OZAN KOSE (Photo credit should read OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images)
The coffins of mother Rehan Kurdi, and Syrian boys Aylan, 3, and Galip, 5, who were washed up drowned on a beach near Turkish resort of Bodrum on Wednesday, are placed in a funeral car in Mugla, Turkey, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. Images of Aylan’s body on the beach, have heightened global attention to a wave of migration, driven by war and deprivation, that is unparalleled since World War II. (AP Photos/Emrah Gurel)
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Aylan's 5-year-old brother, Galip, and mother, Rehan, 35, were among 12 people, including other children, who died after two boats capsized while trying to reach the Greek island of Kos.

"The things that happened to us here, in the country where we took refuge to escape war in our homeland, we want the whole world to see this," Abdullah told reporters.

"We want the world's attention on us, so that they can prevent the same from happening to others. Let this be the last," he said.

In a statement to police obtained by the Hurriyet newspaper, Abdullah said he had twice paid smugglers to take him and his family to Greece but their efforts had failed. They had then decided to find a boat and row themselves but it began to take in water and when people stood up in panic, it capsized.

"I was holding my wife's hand. My children slipped away from my hands. We tried to hold on to the boat," he said in the statement. "Everyone was screaming in pitch darkness. I couldn't make my voice heard to my wife and kids."

The image of Aylan, drowned off one of Turkey's most popular holiday resorts, went viral on social media and piled pressure on European leaders.

"European countries, which have turned the Mediterranean, the cradle of the world's oldest civilizations, into a cemetery for refugees, shares the sin for every refugee who loses their life," Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan said.

French Prime Minister Manuel Valls took to Twitter: "He had a name: Aylan Kurdi. Urgent action required - A Europe-wide mobilisation is urgent," he wrote.

Abdullah's family had wanted to emigrate to Canada after fleeing the war-torn town of Kobani, a revelation which also put Canada's Conservative government under fire from its political opponents.

Abdullah said Canadian officials had now offered him citizenship after seeing what had happened but that he declined. Canadian officials in the capital Ottawa said it was not true that Ottawa had offered him citizenship.

Abdullah's sister in Vancouver said contrary to earlier reports, she had not yet tried to sponsor Abdullah, his wife and sons to come to Canada, but that she had first sponsored another brother, whose application had been rejected.

Tima Kurdi said the brother's application was rejected because the family did not have a UN number, which they could not obtain because they did not have Turkish identification. She said she could only afford to sponsor her brothers one at a time.

"They didn't deserve to die, they didn't. They were going for a better life. That shouldn't have happened. It shouldn't have happened to them," she told reporters in Vancouver, breaking down in tears.

"To be honest, I don't want to just blame the Canadian government. I'm blaming the whole world for this."

See other images of migrants in Hungary:

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Migrants being stopped in Hungary
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Father of drowned Syrian toddlers prepares to take bodies home
Migrants struggle to board a train at the railway station in Budapest, Hungary, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. Over 150,000 migrants have reached Hungary this year, most coming through the southern border with Serbia, and many apply for asylum but quickly try to leave for richer EU countries.(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
A young child cries as hundreds of migrants try to board a train at the Keleti Railway Station in Budapest, Hungary, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. Over 150,000 migrants have reached Hungary this year, most coming through the southern border with Serbia. Many apply for asylum but quickly try to leave for richer EU countries. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
Migrants try to board a train at the railway station in Budapest, Hungary, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. Over 150,000 migrants have reached Hungary this year, most coming through the southern border with Serbia, and many apply for asylum but quickly try to leave for richer EU countries.(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Migrants try to board a train at the railway station in Budapest, Hungary, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. Over 150,000 migrants have reached Hungary this year, most coming through the southern border with Serbia, and many apply for asylum but quickly try to leave for richer EU countries.(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Migrants enter the main gate at the railway station in Budapest, Hungary, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. Over 150,000 migrants have reached Hungary this year, most coming through the southern border with Serbia, and many apply for asylum but quickly try to leave for richer EU countries.(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Migrants wash at a water place in front of the railwaystation in Budapest, Hungary, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. Over 150,000 migrants have reached Hungary this year, most coming through the southern border with Serbia, and many apply for asylum but quickly try to leave for richer EU countries.(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Supporters and activists of the Migration Aid civil group hold a demonstration in support of migrants at Kossuth Square, in front of the Hungarian Parliament building in Budapest, Hungary, Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015. Over 150,000 migrants have reached Hungary this year, most coming through the southern border with Serbia. Many apply for asylum but quickly try to leave for richer EU countries. (Noemi Bruzak/MTI via AP)
Hungarian policemen stand guard near to the Hungarian town of Roszke at the border with Serbia, on Wednesday Sept. 2, 2015. The 28-nation European Union has been at odds for months on how to deal with the influx of more than 332,000 migrants this year as Greece, Italy and Hungary have pleaded for more help. (AP Photo/Santi Palacios)
A group of refugees walk on the railway tracks after crossing from Serbia, in Roszke, Hungary, Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015. Migrants fearful of death at sea in overcrowded and flimsy boats have increasingly turned to using a land route towards Europe through the Western Balkans. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
Hundreds of migrants wait in front of the Keleti Railway Station after police stopped them from boarding trains to Germany, Budapest, Hungary, Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
A woman rests in a tent as hundreds of migrants wait near the Keleti Railway Station after police stopped them from boarding trains to Germany, in Budapest, Hungary, Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - SEPTEMBER 01: Migrants gather in the transit zone near Keleti station in central Budapest on September 1, 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. The station was closed today and was said to be an attempt by the Hungarian government to uphold EU law and restore order after recent choatic scenes at the station. According to the Hungarian authorities a record number of migrants from many parts of the Middle East, Africa and Asia crossed the border from Serbia earlier this week, said to be due in part to the erection of a new fence that is due to be completed at the end of this month. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called Balkans route has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The massive increase, said to be the largest migration of people since World War II, led Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban to order Hungary's army to build a steel and barbed wire security barrier along its entire border with Serbia, after more than 100,000 asylum seekers from a variety of countries and war zones entered the country so far this year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - SEPTEMBER 01: Migrants gather in the transit zone near Keleti station in central Budapest on September 1, 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. The station was closed today and was said to be an attempt by the Hungarian government to uphold EU law and restore order after recent choatic scenes at the station. According to the Hungarian authorities a record number of migrants from many parts of the Middle East, Africa and Asia crossed the border from Serbia earlier this week, said to be due in part to the erection of a new fence that is due to be completed at the end of this month. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called Balkans route has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The massive increase, said to be the largest migration of people since World War II, led Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban to order Hungary's army to build a steel and barbed wire security barrier along its entire border with Serbia, after more than 100,000 asylum seekers from a variety of countries and war zones entered the country so far this year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - SEPTEMBER 01: Migrants gather in the transit zone at Keleti station in central Budapest on September 1, 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. The station was closed today and was said to be an attempt by the Hungarian government to uphold EU law and restore order after recent choatic scenes at the station. According to the Hungarian authorities a record number of migrants from many parts of the Middle East, Africa and Asia crossed the border from Serbia earlier this week, said to be due in part to the erection of a new fence that is due to be completed at the end of this month. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called Balkans route has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The massive increase, said to be the largest migration of people since World War II, led Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban to order Hungary's army to build a steel and barbed wire security barrier along its entire border with Serbia, after more than 100,000 asylum seekers from a variety of countries and war zones entered the country so far this year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - SEPTEMBER 01: Migrants gather in the transit zone near Keleti station in central Budapest on September 1, 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. The station was closed today and was said to be an attempt by the Hungarian government to uphold EU law and restore order after recent choatic scenes at the station. According to the Hungarian authorities a record number of migrants from many parts of the Middle East, Africa and Asia crossed the border from Serbia earlier this week, said to be due in part to the erection of a new fence that is due to be completed at the end of this month. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called Balkans route has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The massive increase, said to be the largest migration of people since World War II, led Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban to order Hungary's army to build a steel and barbed wire security barrier along its entire border with Serbia, after more than 100,000 asylum seekers from a variety of countries and war zones entered the country so far this year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - SEPTEMBER 01: Migrants gather in front of Keleti station in central Budapest on September 1, 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. The station was closed today and was said to be an attempt by the Hungarian government to uphold EU law and restore order after recent choatic scenes at the station. According to the Hungarian authorities a record number of migrants from many parts of the Middle East, Africa and Asia crossed the border from Serbia earlier this week, said to be due in part to the erection of a new fence that is due to be completed at the end of this month. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called Balkans route has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The massive increase, said to be the largest migration of people since World War II, led Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban to order Hungary's army to build a steel and barbed wire security barrier along its entire border with Serbia, after more than 100,000 asylum seekers from a variety of countries and war zones entered the country so far this year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - SEPTEMBER 01: Migrants gather in the transit zone near Keleti station in central Budapest on September 1, 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. The station was closed today and was said to be an attempt by the Hungarian government to uphold EU law and restore order after recent choatic scenes at the station. According to the Hungarian authorities a record number of migrants from many parts of the Middle East, Africa and Asia crossed the border from Serbia earlier this week, said to be due in part to the erection of a new fence that is due to be completed at the end of this month. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called Balkans route has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The massive increase, said to be the largest migration of people since World War II, led Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban to order Hungary's army to build a steel and barbed wire security barrier along its entire border with Serbia, after more than 100,000 asylum seekers from a variety of countries and war zones entered the country so far this year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - SEPTEMBER 01: Migrants gather in the transit zone near Keleti station in central Budapest on September 1, 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. The station was closed today and was said to be an attempt by the Hungarian government to uphold EU law and restore order after recent choatic scenes at the station. According to the Hungarian authorities a record number of migrants from many parts of the Middle East, Africa and Asia crossed the border from Serbia earlier this week, said to be due in part to the erection of a new fence that is due to be completed at the end of this month. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called Balkans route has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The massive increase, said to be the largest migration of people since World War II, led Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban to order Hungary's army to build a steel and barbed wire security barrier along its entire border with Serbia, after more than 100,000 asylum seekers from a variety of countries and war zones entered the country so far this year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - SEPTEMBER 01: A mother carries her infant girl as migrants protest outside Keleti station in central Budapest after it was closed to migrants earlier today on September 1, 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. The closure was said to be an attempt by the Hungarian government to uphold EU law and restore order after recent choatic scenes at the station. According to the Hungarian authorities a record number of migrants from many parts of the Middle East, Africa and Asia crossed the border from Serbia earlier this week, said to be due in part to the erection of a new fence that is due to be completed at the end of this month. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called Balkans route has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The massive increase, said to be the largest migration of people since World War II, led Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban to order Hungary's army to build a steel and barbed wire security barrier along its entire border with Serbia, after more than 100,000 asylum seekers from a variety of countries and war zones entered the country so far this year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - SEPTEMBER 01: Hungarian police guard the main entrance as migrants protest outside Keleti station in central Budapest after it was closed to migrants earlier today on September 1, 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. The closure was said to be an attempt by the Hungarian government to uphold EU law and restore order after recent choatic scenes at the station. According to the Hungarian authorities a record number of migrants from many parts of the Middle East, Africa and Asia crossed the border from Serbia earlier this week, said to be due in part to the erection of a new fence that is due to be completed at the end of this month. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called Balkans route has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The massive increase, said to be the largest migration of people since World War II, led Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban to order Hungary's army to build a steel and barbed wire security barrier along its entire border with Serbia, after more than 100,000 asylum seekers from a variety of countries and war zones entered the country so far this year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - SEPTEMBER 01: A young girl holds up a handmade flag of Afghanistan as migrants protest outside Keleti station in central Budapest after it was closed to migrants earlier today on September 1, 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. The closure was said to be an attempt by the Hungarian government to uphold EU law and restore order after recent choatic scenes at the station. According to the Hungarian authorities a record number of migrants from many parts of the Middle East, Africa and Asia crossed the border from Serbia earlier this week, said to be due in part to the erection of a new fence that is due to be completed at the end of this month. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called Balkans route has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The massive increase, said to be the largest migration of people since World War II, led Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban to order Hungary's army to build a steel and barbed wire security barrier along its entire border with Serbia, after more than 100,000 asylum seekers from a variety of countries and war zones entered the country so far this year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - SEPTEMBER 01: Migrants protest outside Keleti station in central Budapest after it was closed to migrants earlier today on September 1, 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. The closure was said to be an attempt by the Hungarian government to uphold EU law and restore order after recent choatic scenes at the station. According to the Hungarian authorities a record number of migrants from many parts of the Middle East, Africa and Asia crossed the border from Serbia earlier this week, said to be due in part to the erection of a new fence that is due to be completed at the end of this month. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called Balkans route has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The massive increase, said to be the largest migration of people since World War II, led Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban to order Hungary's army to build a steel and barbed wire security barrier along its entire border with Serbia, after more than 100,000 asylum seekers from a variety of countries and war zones entered the country so far this year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - SEPTEMBER 01: Migrants protest outside Keleti station in central Budapest after it was closed to migrants earlier today on September 1, 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. The closure was said to be an attempt by the Hungarian government to uphold EU law and restore order after recent choatic scenes at the station. According to the Hungarian authorities a record number of migrants from many parts of the Middle East, Africa and Asia crossed the border from Serbia earlier this week, said to be due in part to the erection of a new fence that is due to be completed at the end of this month. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called Balkans route has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The massive increase, said to be the largest migration of people since World War II, led Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban to order Hungary's army to build a steel and barbed wire security barrier along its entire border with Serbia, after more than 100,000 asylum seekers from a variety of countries and war zones entered the country so far this year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - SEPTEMBER 01: Migrants protest outside Keleti station in central Budapest after it was closed to migrants earlier today on September 1, 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. The closure was said to be an attempt by the Hungarian government to uphold EU law and restore order after recent choatic scenes at the station. According to the Hungarian authorities a record number of migrants from many parts of the Middle East, Africa and Asia crossed the border from Serbia earlier this week, said to be due in part to the erection of a new fence that is due to be completed at the end of this month. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called Balkans route has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The massive increase, said to be the largest migration of people since World War II, led Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban to order Hungary's army to build a steel and barbed wire security barrier along its entire border with Serbia, after more than 100,000 asylum seekers from a variety of countries and war zones entered the country so far this year. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
BUDAPEST, HUNGARY - SEPTEMBER 1: Police forces stand guard when migrants wait at the main Eastern Railway station in Budapest, Hungary, September 1, 2015. Hungary closed Budapest's main Eastern Railway station on Tuesday morning with no trains departing or arriving until further notice, a spokesman for state railway company MAV said. There are hundreds of migrants at the station, trying to get to Germany. (Photo by Arpad Kurucz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
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OTHER CHILDREN DROWNED

Turkey has won international praise for taking in 2 million refugees since the Syrian civil war began in March 2011, spending $6 billion caring for them and receiving just $400 million in outside aid.

But it has warned it is reaching capacity, and thousands are now making the perilous journey by boat from Turkey to Greece in a bid to enter Europe.

Security officials in Mugla said the bodies of Abdullah's two sons and wife would be flown via Istanbul to the southeastern city of Sanliurfa, from where they would be taken by road to the Syrian border town of Kobani.

Kobani, the family's hometown, has been the scene of intense fighting over the last year. In recent months, Kurdish regional forces have been trying to repel attempts by Islamic State to recapture the town.

Tens of thousands of Syrians fleeing the war in their homeland have descended on Turkey's Aegean coast this summer to board boats to Greece.

The Turkish army said its search and rescue teams had saved hundreds of migrants in the seas between Turkey and Greek islands over the last few days.

The two boats that capsized while heading to Kos were carrying a total of 23 people and had set off from the Akyarlar area of the Bodrum peninsula, a naval official said. Local authorities have detained four suspected Syrian smugglers, the Dogan news agency said.

One of the survivors, Zeynep Abbas Hadi, fainted after seeing the dead bodies of two of her children, aged 9 and 11, footage on the Dogan website showed. Her 7-year-old daughter survived, the agency said.

Another survivor, Syrian Omer Mohsin, said he swam ashore after the boat sank shortly after heading off at 2 a.m. (2300 GMT) and was now looking for his missing brother.

"There were supposed to be 10 people on the boat, but they put 17 people on board. Me and my brother paid 2,050 euros ($2,280) each," Dogan quoted him as saying on its website.

Video footage showed the body of another young child, thought to be Aylan's brother, also lying in the sand.

Nilufer Demir, the Dogan photographer who took the picture of Aylan, told broadcaster CNN Turk: "When I realised there was nothing to do to bring that boy back to life I thought I had to take his picture ... to show the tragedy."

"I hope the impact this photo has created will help bring a solution," she said.

The U.N. refugee agency estimates that almost 160,000 refugees and migrants have arrived in Greece by sea since the start of 2014. In July more than 50,000 people, mostly Syrians, arrived in Greece compared with 43,500 in the whole of 2014.

(Additional reporting by Tulay Karadeniz in Ankara, Humeyra Pamuk and Daren Butler in Istanbul; Julie Gordon in Vancouver and Andrea Hopkins in Toronto; Writing by Dasha Afanasieva; Editing by Gareth Jones and Matthew Lewis)

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