Barcelona-based design firm proposes floating farms

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Floating Farms Are the Agriculture of the Future


In the heat of climate change, limited resources, population growth and the ever-growing need for more food, one architecture firm has proposed an incredible solution: Farms -- that float in the open sea. They can exist anywhere where there is a need. The best part? They'll be completely autonomous.

Smithsonian Magazine notes the design outlines a "large triple-decker agriculture barges that feature fish farms down below, hydroponic gardens up top and solar panels on the roof to keep things running." It's sustainable, eco-friendly, and could provide a lot of food for those in need.

While they don't exist yet, Forward-thinking Architecture, the Barcelona-based firm that proposed the ambitious project, is hopeful. The firm explained on its website:

This is not science fiction. It is a serious and viable solution. It is not meant to 'solve' all of humanity's hunger problems or to replace existing traditional agriculture; this is not the idea at all. The driver behind the project is to open a new initiative which can be complementary and compatible with other existing production methods in order to help reduce food risk associated problems in different areas of the globe.

Check out another incredible farming feat -- underwater strawberry farms:
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Underwater Strawberry Farmers
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Barcelona-based design firm proposes floating farms
**TO GO WITH AFP FEATURE STORY BY OLIVIER MORIN, WITH ANGUS MACKINNON IN ROME. Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi, checks an immersed biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. Three biospheres filled with unpolluted air helps plants grow underwater at a depth of 8 meters. In the homeland of pesto, diving enthusiasts have come up with a way of growing basil and other plants in a process that could revolutionise crop production in arid coastal areas around the world. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
**TO GO WITH AFP FEATURE STORY BY OLIVIER MORIN, WITH ANGUS MACKINNON IN ROME. Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi, checks immersed biospheres on June 27, 2015 in Noli. Three biospheres filled with unpolluted air helps plants grow underwater at a depth of 8 meters. In the homeland of pesto, diving enthusiasts have come up with a way of growing basil and other plants in a process that could revolutionise crop production in arid coastal areas around the world. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
**TO GO WITH AFP FEATURE STORY BY OLIVIER MORIN, WITH ANGUS MACKINNON IN ROME. Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi, checks immersed biospheres on June 27, 2015 in Noli. Three biospheres filled with unpolluted air helps plants grow underwater at a depth of 8 meters. In the homeland of pesto, diving enthusiasts have come up with a way of growing basil and other plants in a process that could revolutionise crop production in arid coastal areas around the world. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi checks condensation inside immerged Biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
**TO GO WITH AFP FEATURE STORY BY OLIVIER MORIN, WITH ANGUS MACKINNON IN ROME. Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi, checks condensation inside an immersed biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. Three biospheres filled with unpolluted air helps plants grow underwater at a depth of 8 meters. In the homeland of pesto, diving enthusiasts have come up with a way of growing basil and other plants in a process that could revolutionise crop production in arid coastal areas around the world. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
**TO GO WITH AFP FEATURE STORY BY OLIVIER MORIN, WITH ANGUS MACKINNON IN ROME. Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi, checks condensation inside an immersed biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. Three biospheres filled with unpolluted air helps plants grow underwater at a depth of 8 meters. In the homeland of pesto, diving enthusiasts have come up with a way of growing basil and other plants in a process that could revolutionise crop production in arid coastal areas around the world. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
**TO GO WITH AFP FEATURE STORY BY OLIVIER MORIN, WITH ANGUS MACKINNON IN ROME. This picture taken on June 27, 2015 shows the underwater garden known as Nemo's Garden, in Noli. Three biospheres filled with unpolluted air helps plants grow underwater at a depth of 8 meters. In the homeland of pesto, diving enthusiasts have come up with a way of growing basil and other plants in a process that could revolutionise crop production in arid coastal areas around the world. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
**TO GO WITH AFP FEATURE STORY BY OLIVIER MORIN, WITH ANGUS MACKINNON IN ROME. Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi, checks immersed biospheres on June 27, 2015 in Noli. Three biospheres filled with unpolluted air helps plants grow underwater at a depth of 8 meters. In the homeland of pesto, diving enthusiasts have come up with a way of growing basil and other plants in a process that could revolutionise crop production in arid coastal areas around the world. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi sets some soil inside immerged Biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi sets some soil inside immerged Biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi set some soil inside immerged Biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi set some soil inside immerged Biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi set some soil inside immerged Biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi checks sensors inside immerged Biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi check immerged Biospheres on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO / OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi check immerged Biospheres on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi check immerged Biospheres on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO / OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
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