Argentine gauchos face challenges of the modern global economy

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

17 PHOTOS
NTP: Argentine Gauchos
See Gallery
Argentine gauchos face challenges of the modern global economy
Gaucho Jose Luis Semorile trains a young quarter horse at the Estancia La Argentina farm in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina, on Tuesday, July 28, 2015. Jose works as a horse trainer, and he contracts with his sons to break and train cattle horses for farms in the area. 'It's my passion,' he says, but he also takes on other jobs to make ends meet, including working as a baker. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Farm hands eat lunch in the kitchen at the Estancia La Argentina farm in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina, on Tuesday, July 28, 2015. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Gauchos Pablo Chavez, left, and Daniel Lopez ride the range looking for cattle to corral at the Estancia La Argentina farm in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina, on Monday, July 27, 2015. Daniel and Pablo work the fields of the large farm from horseback every day, but in a modern twist, also provide bovine health services and help manage the breeding of the farm's herd. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Gaucho Daniel Lopez drives cows into a pasture on the Estancia La Argentina farm in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina, on Monday, July 27, 2015. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Gauchos Daniel Lopez, left, and Pablo Chavez, hold down a newborn calf and tattoo its ear at the Estancia La Argentina farm in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina, on Monday, July 27, 2015. Daniel and Pablo work the fields of the large farm from horseback every day, but in a modern twist, also provide bovine health services and help manage the breeding of the farms herd. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The sun rises over a lone windmill at the Estancia La Argentina farm in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina, on Monday, July 27, 2015. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A gaucho rides in a parade at the 2015 Rural Exposition in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on Sunday, July 26, 2015. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A boy dressed in traditional clothing attends the 2015 Rural Exposition in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on Sunday, July 26, 2015. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Gaucho Pablo Chavez, left, and other riders dressed in traditional clothing, prepare to participate in a competition at the 2015 Rural Exposition in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on Sunday, July 26, 2015. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Gaucho Luis Daniel Cerrudo waits to rope a calf to be castrated at a farm in Duggan, outside of San Antonio de Areco, Argentina, on Saturday, July 25, 2015. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Gaucho Pablo Chavez, left, performs an artificial insemination on a cow for farmer Martin Vivanco, right, in Duggan, Argentina, on Friday, July 24, 2015. Pablo studied at night classes for four years to earn a technical certificate in agricultural administration, as well as becoming an expert in bovine health and reproduction. He uses this knowledge to provide inseminations and vaccinations that augment his income as a cow hand. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Gaucho Luis Daniel Cerrudo holds onto a cattle horse as it rears at a farm in Duggan, outside of San Antonio de Areco, Argentina, on Saturday, July 25, 2015. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Gaucho and 'domador,' or horse trainer, Luis Daniel Cerrudo trains a young horse on the Estancia La Argentina farm outside of San Antonio de Areco, Argentina, on Wednesday, July 22, 2015. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Gauchos Jose Luis Semorile, left, and his stepson Luis Daniel Cerrudo, right, train horses on the Estancia La Argentina farm outside of San Antonio de Areco, Argentina, on Wednesday, July 22, 2015. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Morning dew clings to grasses in a pasture, typical of the Argentine Pampas, in Duggan, Argentina, on Friday, July 24, 2015. The Pampas are the great plains of Argentina, and for generations have been the cradle of beef production as well as gaucho culture in the country. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Gauchos Pablo Chavez, 31, left, and Daniel Lopez, 29, take an afternoon break at the Estancia La Argentina farm outside San Antonio de Areco, Argentina, on Friday, July 24, 2015. Pablo studied at night classes for four years to earn a technical certificate in agricultural administration, as well as becoming an expert in bovine health and reproduction. He uses this knowledge to provide inseminations and vaccinations that augment his income as a cow hand. Over the years, its become more and more difficult for Argentinas modern-day cowboys, or gauchos, to make ends meet in an industry shaken by factors such as global commodity trading and expanded soybean production. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, the lone horseman is finding himself increasingly out of demand. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


In an industry shaken by factors such as expanded soybean production and global commodity trading, it has become more and more difficult for Argentinian gauchos, or modern-day cowboys to make ends meet. With fewer and fewer cattle to run, many trainers take on other jobs to be financially stable, but for many, it's their fiery passion and love of training that keeps them returning back to what is usually a long-held family tradition. Click above to see the stunning photographs of Argentina's modern cowboys.

Related: A man and his horse -- cowboy in Patagonia, Argentina

A Man and His Horse: Cowboy in Patagonia, Argentina
Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners