Murder rates soar in major United States' cities ... but no one knows why

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Murder Rates On The Rise In America


New numbers show that murder rates are rising sharply across the U.S. — but no one can seem to explain why.

According to a recent New York Times report, at least 35 major cities have reported a spike in murders, violent crimes or both.

In St. Louis murders have risen by 60% and Baltimore by 56% since the same date in 2014.

Last month in New Orleans, 120 people were killed by late August -- that's compared to 98 during the same time last year.

Milwaukee, Wisconsin saw the biggest increase at 76%. The city has already reported 104 murders, compared to 59 in all of 2014.

See photos of cities where murders have spiked:

8 PHOTOS
Murder rates soar in major US cities
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Murder rates soar in major United States' cities ... but no one knows why
In this July 30, 2015 picture, a member of the Baltimore Police Department removes crime scene tape from a corner where a victim of a shooting was discovered in Baltimore. Murders are spiking again in Baltimore, three months after Freddie Gray's death in police custody sparked riots. This year's monthly bloodshed has twice reached levels unseen in a quarter-century. In May, Baltimore set a 25-year high of 42 recorded killings. After a brief dip in June, the homicide is soaring again. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
In this July 30, 2015 picture, balloons and candles mark a spot where a man was shot earlier in the week, in Baltimore. Murders are spiking again in Baltimore, three months after Freddie Gray's death in police custody sparked riots. This year's monthly bloodshed has twice reached levels unseen in a quarter-century. In May, Baltimore set a 25-year high of 42 recorded killings. After a brief dip in June, the homicide is soaring again. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Police patrol a downtown street Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015, in St. Louis. With the city facing an increase in violent crime, including homicides, St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson has asked the Missouri State Highway Patrol to assist policing downtown, a patrol official said Wednesday. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
A Baltimore Police officer follows a man, who screamed "Let me in! I'm going in!" before crossing the yellow tape and walking into the crime scene on the 100 block of Upmanor Road, in Baltimore, where a young boy and a 31-year-old woman were shot and killed, Thursday, May 28, 2015. In the month since Freddie Gray died and the city erupted in civil unrest, Baltimore has seen its murder rate skyrocket. There have been 36 murders in May alone. (AP Photo/Juliet Linderman)
This July 30, 2015 picture shows a blighted home in west Baltimore. Murders are spiking again in Baltimore, three months after Freddie Gray's death in police custody sparked riots. This year's monthly bloodshed has twice reached levels unseen in a quarter-century. In May, Baltimore set a 25-year high of 42 recorded killings. After a brief dip in June, the homicide is soaring again. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Investigators look over a New Orleans Police department vehicle in which one officer was shot and killed while transporting a prisoner in New Orleans, Saturday, June 20, 2015. The New Orleans Police Department said Officer Daryle Holloway was shot while transporting Travis Boys, who managed to get his handcuffed hands from behind his back to the front, grab a firearm and shoot the officer. A manhunt was underway for the 33-year-old Boys, according to Police Chief Michael Harrison. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Police and K-9 search the area where a New Orleans Police officer was shot and killed in his vehicle while transporting a prisoner in New Orleans, Saturday, June 20, 2015. The prisoner remains at large. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
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Homicides in cities like Los Angeles and Newark have remained relatively steady and urban bloodshed, as the Times calls it, remains far below the peaks of the late 80s and early 90s.

As for a reason for the increase, some theories include an increase in gun ownership, less aggressive policing, young people settling disputes with violence, gang-related killings as well as an increase in killings being carried out insides homes — which are "difficult crimes to predict or prevent."

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