Remembering the Superdome's role during Hurricane Katrina

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Remembering the Superdome's role during Hurricane Katrina
Some of the thousands of displaced residents take cover from Hurricane Katrina at the Superdome, a last-resort shelter, in New Orleans about midnight, Sunday, Aug. 28, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many residents remained in the city. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
NEW ORLEANS - AUGUST 29: The roof of the Louisiana Superdome is seen damaged due to the strong winds of Hurricane Katrina August 29, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Katrina made landfall this morning as a Category 4 strom with sustained winds in excess of 135 mph near Empire, Louisiana. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
National Guard trucks haul residents through floodwaters to the Superdome after Hurricane Katrina hit in New Orleans, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many residents remained in the city. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
UNITED STATES - CIRCA 2005: Lawrence and Vanessa Arnollie take shelter in the Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana following the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, which hit the Gulf Coast states on August 29th, 2005. After three days with no running water and intense heat and humidity the shelter has become unsanitary and unsafe. Officials prepare evacuation despite the flood water surrounding the building. (Photo by Michael Appleton/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - CIRCA 2005: Light streaming down through the ceiling of the Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana illuminates a ragged crowd of refugees taking shelter at the arena in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, which hit the Gulf Coast states on August 29th, 2005. (Photo by Michael Appleton/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
IN FLIGHT- AUGUST 30: The damaged roof from Hurricane Katrina of the Louisiana Superdome is seen August 30, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Approximately 100 people are feared dead and estimates put the property loss at nearly $30 billion as Hurricane Katrina could become the costliest storm in US history. It is estimated that 80 percent of New Orleans is under flood waters as levees begin to break and leak around Lake Ponchartrain. (Photo by Dave Einsel/Getty Images)
Huge shafts of light filter through the damaged roof of the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans on Friday, Sept. 2, 2005. The dome is littered with debris after serving as a shelter for victims from Hurricane Katrina. A huge military presence has arrived in the city, restoring order and bringing with them food and water to feed the thousands of victims of Hurricane Katrina. (AP Photo/Bill Haber)
Thousands wait to be evacuated from the Superdome, Friday, Sept. 2, 2005, in New Orleans. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, pool)
Huge shafts of light strike the playing field of the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans on Friday, Sept. 2, 2005. The dome is littered with debris after serving as a shelter for victims from Hurricane Katrina. The light is filtering in through holes in the roof. A huge military presence has arrived in the city, restoring order and bringing with them food and water to feed the thousands of victims of Hurricane Katrina. (AP Photo/Bill Haber)
Volunteers set up cots on the floor of Houston's Astrodome Thursday, Sept. 1, 2005. More than 20,000 evacuees from Hurricane Katrina are expected to be transported from the New Orleans Superdome to the Astrodome over the next two days. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)
Joshwa Coyette, 3 cries inside the Houston Astrodome on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2005, in Houston. Joshwa and several of his siblings were rescued by their child care provider, Natasha Collins, who floated the children to the New Orleans Superdome on a mattress. Coyette's mother is one of the missing. (AP Photo/Jessica Kourkounis)
New Orleans, UNITED STATES: The last of the Hurricane Katrina survivors who used the Superdome in New Orleans as shelter wait 02 September, 2005. The New Orleans sports arena that housed hurricane refugees for five days in lawless squalor was finally emptied Friday, though many remained stranded with no immediate prospect of evacuation. While relieved to leave the confines of the Superdome, where many testified to pitch-dark nights of gunfire, rioting and rape, the evacuees found the devastated city outside offered little in the way of comfort. AFP PHOTO/JAMES NIELSEN (Photo credit should read JAMES NIELSEN/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers begin the job or repairing the roof of the Louisiana Superdome Saturday Oct. 15, 2005 in New Orleans. The Superdome will undergo temporary repairs to gaping holes in its massive roof. An architectural firm is set to be picked next week and it will come up with a plan for restoring a stadium that was left waterlogged and vandalized during Hurricane Katrina. (AP Photo/Bill Haber)
Cleanup work continues on the inside of the Superdome in New Orleans, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2005, as workers are about to finish patching up the roof, damaged by Hurricane Katrina. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
NEW ORLEANS - MAY 25: Painter Anselmo Martinez, originally from Mexico, goes over plans as work continues on the Superdome, which was damaged by Hurricane Katrina, May 25, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The stadium is scheduled to be repaired and 'football-ready' in four months for the New Orleans Saints home opener against the Atlanta Falcons September 25, 2006. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - JULY 18: Workers continue to repair the dome of the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana, on July 18, 2006. Superdome was severely damages in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. (Photo by Andy Nelson/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - MAY 25: Work continues on the Superdome, which was damaged by Hurricane Katrina, May 25, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The stadium is scheduled to be repaired and 'football-ready' in four months for the New Orleans Saints home opener against the Atlanta Falcons September 25, 2006. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - JULY 25: Work continues on the Louisiana Superdome to repair damage from Hurricane Katrina July 25, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Superdome is scheduled to open for the first New Orleans Saints home game on September 25. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - JULY 25: Rows of new seats are covered to protect them during construction inside the Louisiana Superdome July 25, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Following the damage from Hurricane Katrina, the Superdome is scheduled to reopen for the New Orleans Saints first home game on September 25, 2006. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
Seats are covered and heavy equipment fills the floor as construction continues for the opening of the Superdome for the Saints next season in New Orleans on Wednesday April 19, 2006. The Superdome, used as a shelter during Hurricane Katrina, was heavily damaged and is closed for repairs. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
** ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY, AUG. 20 **Workmen repair the roof of the Louisiana Superdome, badly damaged Hurricane Katrina, in New Orleans June 8, 2006. They completed replacement of the 9.7-acre roof by July 19, weeks ahead of schedule. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
NEW ORLEANS - JUNE 13: This is a satellite image of downtown New Orleans, Louisiana collected on June 13, 2006, New Orleans Louisiana. (Photo DigitalGlobe via Getty Images)
Kelly Johnson, from Austin, Texas, center, with Sportexe is framed by the center of a zero as he works to install the new turf in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans on Tuesday Sept. 5, 2006. The Momentum turf was damaged during Hurricane Katrina. The Superdome is being readied for the Saints home opener on Monday, Sept. 25th against the Atlanta Falcons. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Carlos Ortega watches through the hole as he lowers a piece of the old vent to the floor of the Superdome in New Orleans on Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2006. The roof of the Superdome heavily damaged by Hurricane Katrina, has been completely redone, with only the vents on top left to be finished. The New Orleans Saints will play the Atlanta Falcons for the first event in the Superdome on Monday, Sept. 25th. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
**FILE** Francis Castaneda wipes off seats as the Superdome is readied in New Orleans in this Sept. 18, 2006 file photo. Two years after Hurricane Katrina almost nothing seems the same in New Orleans, but one thing has not changed _ a cool regard by business for what was once a major Southern commercial center. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, file)
New Orleans Saints players Ben Archibald (60) and Rob Petitti (79) look up at the lights as the Saints hold their first practice inside the Superdome in New Orleans on Friday, Sept. 22, 2006. The Superdome was heavily damaged by Hurricane Katrina and has been repaired and renovated for the Saints first home game against the Atlanta Falcons on Monday, Sept. 25th.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
The Superdome has the lights dimmed during preparations for the upcoming Monday Night Football game in New Orleans on Sunday, Sept. 24, 2006. The Superdome was heavily damaged by Hurricane Katrina and used as a shelter from the storm by tens of thousands of people. The first event in the Superdome will be the New Orleans Saints and Atlanta Falcons game on Monday, Sept. 25th.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 25: Quarterback Drew Brees #9 of the New Orleans Saints huddles up his team during the first quarter of the Monday Night Football game against the Atlanta Falcons on September 25, 2006 at the Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. Tonight's game marks the first time since Hurricane Katrina struck last August, that the Superdome, which served as a temporary shelter to thousands of stranded victims in the wake of Katrina, has played host to an NFL game. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 25: Wide receiver Devery Henderson #19 of the New Orleans Saints is challenged by Demorrio Williams #51 of the Atlanta Falcons during the first quarter of the Monday Night Football game on September 25, 2006 at the Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. Tonight's game marks the first time since Hurricane Katrina struck last August, that the Superdome, which served as a temporary shelter to thousands of stranded victims in the wake of Katrina, has played host to an NFL game. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 25: Runningback Reggie Bush #25 waves to the fans he leaves the field after the Saints 23-3 victory over the Atlanta Falcons in the Monday Night Football game on September 25, 2006 at the Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. Tonight's game marks the first time since Hurricane Katrina struck last August, that the Superdome, which served as a temporary shelter to thousands of stranded victims in the wake of Katrina, has played host to an NFL game. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 25: Quarterback Drew Brees #9 of the New Orleans Saints celebrates with teammate Jammal Brown #70 after their team's 23-3 victory over the Atlanta Falcons in the Monday Night Football game on September 25, 2006 at the Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. Tonight's game marks the first time since Hurricane Katrina struck last August, that the Superdome, which served as a temporary shelter to thousands of stranded victims in the wake of Katrina, has played host to an NFL game. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
A sign still hangs on the Louisiana Superdome a day after it's re-opening in New Orleans Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2006. The New Orleans Saints defeated the Atlanta Falcons 23-3 on Monday night which helped to celebrate the grand re-opening of the Hurricane Katrina-damaged facility.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
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by JOHN DORN

The Mercedes-Benz Superdome is a landmark in the city of New Orleans. During Hurricane Katrina, then known as the Louisiana Superdome, the arena was used as a "shelter of last resort" to the thousands unable to evacuate the ravaged city.

The thought was novel, and actually carried out on prior occasions. But order was disparate, and resources became harder to come by as time passed. The roof, which was built to withstand most of what nature could bring, became torn and pierced.

SEE MORE: Special coverage on the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina

According to the AP, two separate holes were torn into the roof, "each about 15 to 20 feet (6.1 m) long and 4 to 5 feet (1.5 m) wide." Water made its way into elevator shafts and other areas, rendering the Superdome effectively useless -- in terms of shelter and home to the New Orleans Saints.

By Aug. 30, crime and death made its way from outside the arena to the inside, where there were reported suicides, rape, vandalism, drug dealing and gang activity. What was one of the city's proudest monuments had become a depiction of just how destructed New Orleans had become.

But as it eventually regained its form, new life was pumped into the desperate city.

The Saints played their entire season splitting their home games between the Alamodome, Tiger Stadium and Giants Stadium and four college football games were forced to find new hosts as the dome underwent fixes.

SEE MORE: How Tulane athletes came together

But those fixes were finished in time for the 2006 football season, and when the Superdome finally returned, it was as if the city itself had been rebuilt. Fans flocked to the venue for its first Monday Night Football game on Sept. 25, 2006 to watch their Saints take on the Atlanta Falcons. What they saw was nothing short of magical.

Early in the first quarter, with the crowd already buzzing, Steve Gleason broke free to block a Falcons punt and return it for a crowd-energizing touchdown. It was the first score of a 23-3 route for the Saints and a first-place finish that took them all the way to that year's NFC Championship Game.

Today, the Superdome stands proud as a symbol for what New Orleans has overcome. Ten years after Katrina threatened the dome -- and the entire city -- take time to remember how much the people of New Orleans have overcome to reach where they are today.

A CITY AND ITS TEAMS, LINKED FOREVER
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More Katrina coverage on AOL.com: Facts about the impact of Hurricane Katrina:
Reliving the New Orleans Saints' emotional 2005 season More than 15,000 refugees sought shelter in the Superdome
Meet the man who brought food back to the Lower 9th Ward The storm's final death toll was 1,836
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