How President Obama's climate change plan is panning out

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How Obama Has Tackled Climate Change

On Monday, President Barack Obama announced new financial incentives for homeowners and builders to adopt renewable energy technology like solar panels and smart grid technology in order to protect our environment. This isn't the first unprecedented action Obama has taken to tackle climate change -- in fact, he's done more than any other president in the nation's history.

READ MORE SPECIAL COVERAGE ON CLEAN AIR: Obama pushing for more clean energy choices for consumers

President Obama's quest to limit the effects of climate change started back in June of 2013. He announced his Climate Action Plan, a series of executive actions aimed at reducing carbon pollution and preparing the US for the effects of climate change. Then in November of that year, Obama announced a National Drought Resilience Partnership in order to help communities be better prepared for future droughts.

Take a peek at renewable energy sources below:

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How President Obama's climate change plan is panning out
UNITED STATES Ð AUGUST 26: Wind turbines spin above fields near Carroll, Iowa on Monday, Aug. 26, 2013. (Photo by Bill Clark/Getty Images)
Canada, Ontario, Niagara, Hydro Electric Power Station and bridge to the United States. (Photo by: Eye Ubiquitous/UIG via Getty Images)
FILE- In this file photo made July 14, 2009, wind turbines line a ridge on Stetson Mountain in Stetson, Maine. The state became the regional wind power leader under Democratic Gov. John Baldacci, but change is in the air as Gov. Paul LePage makes an aggressive push away from his predecessor’s renewable energy policies. The outspoken Republican, who says wind power is too expensive, is looking to hydropower from Canada and natural gas to bring down electricity prices that are among the highest in the country. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
FILE - In this April 3, 2015 file photo, President Barack Obama walks through a solar array at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, to speak about clean energy. The growth of renewable energy outpaced that of fossil fuels in the electricity sector last year, with a record 135 gigawatts of capacity added from wind, solar, hydropower and other natural sources, a new study shows. The annual report released early Thursday, June 18, 2015 in Europe by Paris-based REN21, a non-profit group that promotes renewable energy, underscored how China, the world’s top consumer of coal, has become a global leader in clean energy, too. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
Maintenance crews work on the dam at Lake Red Rock, Monday, Aug. 26, 2013, near Pella, Iowa. A power company wants to build a hydroelectric plant at the dam _ a project that reflects renewed interest in hydropower nationwide that could bring changes to scores of American dams. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR BMW OF NORTH AMERICA - BMW donates 20 BMW i3 electric vehicles to NYC Parks in support of the TreesCount! census during a press conference at Julio Carballo Fields on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 in the Bronx Borough of New York. (Photo by Scott Gries/Invision for BMW of North America/AP Images)
Tesla's newest product "Powerwall" is unveiled on stage in Hawthorne, Calif., Thursday, April 30, 2015. Tesla CEO Elon Musk is trying to steer his electric car company's battery technology into homes and businesses as part of an elaborate plan to reshape the power grid with millions of small power plants made of solar panels on roofs and batteries in garages. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)
In this Thursday, Feb. 5, 2015 photo, a parking spot is marked for electric vehicles as Michael Beinenson stands next to his car as it charges outside his workplace in Alpharetta, Ga. Georgia’s generous $5,000 tax credit for electric vehicles is the target of three separate bills in the state House, including one lawmaker trying to end the write-off altogether. “Without the credit, I think we’ll have a shock in the cycle,” said Michael Beinenson, president of the EV Club of the South. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
In this Thursday, Feb. 5, 2015 photo, a sign designates a parking space and charging station for electric vehicles outside a supermarket in Alpharetta, Ga. Electric vehicles are particularly popular in metro Atlanta, where electric vehicle owners can use highway lanes off-limits to solo drivers in a traditional car and a Nissan dealership runs regular radio ads claiming best in the nation sales of the plug-in Leaf. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Tesla product specialist Kat Brand demonstrates how to plug in the electric car at a dealership for the vehicle, Wednesday, Feb. 4, 2015, in Seattle. Washington state's Senate is still figuring out policy on the electric cars gaining popularity, Tesla among them. Bills discussed in hearings this week would extend the sales/use tax exemption for clean-fuel vehicles and require King/Pierce/Thurston counties to give incentives to builders for adding electric-charging stations to projects. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR NRG - The NRG shared solar project in Freetown, Massachusetts, Monday, July 27, 2015. This is the first NRG shared solar, or "community solar," facility in Massachusetts that allows customers to lock in their electricity prices for 20 years. With already 100% of the facility's output powering customers, this 1-megawatt site will service roughly 160 residents in the region. (Aynsley Floyd/AP Images for NRG)
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In February of 2014, the Department of Transportation announced public transport agencies would use $55 million to acquire zero-emission buses. That same month, Obama directed the DOT to develop new fuel efficiency standards for medium and high duty vehicles by 2016.

The president even took his climate change initiative to China, making a deal where the U.S. promised to cut carbon emissions by 26 to 28 percent by 2025, and China agreed to cut emissions by 2030.

See images from President Obama's initial announcement:

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How President Obama's climate change plan is panning out
President Barack Obama speaks at the Global Leadership in the Arctic: Cooperation, Innovation, Engagement and Resilience (GLACIER) Conference at Dena’ina Civic and Convention Center in Anchorage, Alaska, Monday, Aug. 31, 2015. Obama opened a historic three-day trip to Alaska aimed at showing solidarity with a state often overlooked by Washington, while using its changing landscape as an urgent call to action on climate change. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
President Barack Obama speaks at the National Clean Energy Summit at the Mandalay Bay Resort Convention Center, Monday, Aug. 24, 2015, in Las Vegas. The President used the speech to announce a set of executive actions and private sector commitments to accelerate America’s transition to cleaner sources of energy and ways to cut energy waste. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 03: US President Barack Obama speaks about climate change during an event in the East Room at the White House August 3, 2015 in Washington, DC. President Obama announced a major climate change plan aimed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the nation's coal-burning power plants. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
President Barack Obama greets Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval upon his arrival on Air Force One at McCarran International Airport Monday, Aug. 24, 2015, in Las Vegas. Obama traveled to Nevada to speak at the National Clean Energy Summit in Las Vegas and later to a private event for the Nevada State Democratic Party at a residence in Henderson, Nev. (AP Photo/Chase Stevens)
Solar panels used to generate power outside an office building in Los Angeles, California on August 4, 2015. President Barack Obama's Clean Power Plan to slash electricity-generated CO2 emissions was welcomed as a courageous step towards a lower-carbon future, but not yet enough to brake dangerous planet warming. Obama announced August 3 that power plant owners must cut carbon dioxide emissions by 32 percent from 2005 levels by 2030. AFP PHOTO / MARK RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
President Barack Obama speaks about his Clean Power Plan, Monday, Aug. 3, 2015, in the East Room at the White House in Washington. The president is mandating even steeper greenhouse gas cuts from U.S. power plants than previously expected, while granting states more time and broader options to comply. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
President Barack Obama, accompanied by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy, speaks about his Clean Power Plan, Monday, Aug. 3, 2015, in the East Room at the White House in Washington. The president is mandating even steeper greenhouse gas cuts from U.S. power plants than previously expected, while granting states more time and broader options to comply. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
President Barack Obama arrives to speak about his Clean Power Plan, Monday, Aug. 3, 2015, in the East Room at the White House in Washington. The president is mandating even steeper greenhouse gas cuts from U.S. power plants than previously expected, while granting states more time and broader options to comply. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
NEW LONDON, CT - MAY 20: U.S. President Barack Obama gives the keynote address at commencement exercises at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy on May 20, 2015 in New London, Connecticut. Obama used the occasion to speak about the dangers of global warming to both America and international security. This was the 134th commencement exercises at the prestigious academy. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
FILE - In this Tuesday Jan. 20, 2015 file photo, a plume of steam billows from the coal-fired Merrimack Station in Bow, N.H. The Obama Administration’s hotly debated plan to cut the amount of heat-trapping carbon dioxide coming out of the nation’s power plants will save about 3,500 lives a year from also reducing other types of pollutions, a new independent study concludes. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)
In this Nov. 12, 2014 photo, a sign supporting the proposed Plant Washington, a coal-fire power plant, sits near the site where it would be built in Sandersville, Ga. Deep in rural Georgia, a developer is betting he can build one of the last new coal-fired power plants in the United States as the rest of the country moves away from the fuel. The project, which is being developed by Allied Energy Services, is an outlier. If constructed, Plant Washington would be one of just two planned coal plants in the United States to dodge pending rules from President Barack Obama’s administration severely restricting carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide is the chief greenhouse gas blamed for global warming. Still, analysts question whether the estimated $2 billion project, which will be built near Sandersville, Georgia, makes financial sense right now. (AP Photo/Ray Henry)
In this Nov. 12, 2014 photo, a road sits next to where the proposed Plant Washington, a coal-fire power plant, would be built in Sandersville, Ga. Deep in rural Georgia, a developer is betting he can build one of the last new coal-fired power plants in the United States as the rest of the country moves away from the fuel. The project, which is being developed by Allied Energy Services, is an outlier. If constructed, Plant Washington would be one of just two planned coal plants in the United States to dodge pending rules from President Barack Obama’s administration severely restricting carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide is the chief greenhouse gas blamed for global warming. Still, analysts question whether the estimated $2 billion project, which will be built near Sandersville, Georgia, makes financial sense right now. (AP Photo/Ray Henry)
FILE - This Sept. 30, 2014 file photo shows the Colstrip Steam Electric Station operated by Talen Energy in southeastern Montana. Coal companies and their supporters scored a courtroom victory with a U.S. Supreme Court decision that said the Obama administration failed to take potential costs into account when it decided to regulate toxic emissions from many power plants, Monday, June 29, 2015. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
FILE - In this July 1, 2013, file photo, smoke rises from the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal burning power plant in in Colstrip, Mont. A divided Supreme Court on Monday ruled against the Obama administration’s attempt to limit power plant emissions of mercury and other hazardous air pollutants, but it may only be a temporary setback for regulators who will have another chance to get the process right. The justices split 5-4 along ideological lines to rule that the Environmental Protection Agency failed to take cost into account when it first decided to regulate the toxic emissions from coal- and oil-fired plants. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
Matthew Anthony, of Atlanta, sits with a sign advocating clean energy jobs while listening to public testimony at a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency hearing on tougher pollution restrictions, Tuesday, July 29, 2014, in Atlanta. In the Republican-heavy Southeast, critics said Tuesday that a plan by President Barack Obama’s administration to cut pollution would raise electricity prices, result in job losses and may not significantly curtail the carbon emissions blamed for global warming. The criticism came as the EPA held the first of two days of public hearings in Atlanta, Denver and Washington on the plan, which would force a 30 percent cut in carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 2030 from levels seen in 2005. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Sierra Club volunteer Alex Burke organizes signs to hand out near the local Environmental Protection Agency offices, on the first of two days of public hearings held by the EPA on President Barack Obama's plan to cut carbon dioxide emissions by 30 percent by 2030, in Denver, Tuesday, July 29, 2014. In hearings, hundreds of people across the country are telling the EPA its new rules for power-plant pollution either go too far or not far enough. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
The Trianel power plant is pictured at the canal in Luenen, Germany, Thursday, July 24, 2014. The 750-megawatt power plant relies completely on coal imports, about half from the U.S. Soon, all of Germany's coal-fired power plants will be dependent on imports, with the country scheduled to halt all coal mining in 2018 when government subsidies end. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)
The coal-fired Plant Scherer is shown in operation early Sunday, June 1, 2014, in Juliette, Ga. The Obama administration unveiled a plan Monday to cut carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by nearly a third over the next 15 years, in a sweeping initiative to curb pollutants blamed for global warming. (AP Photo/John Amis)
FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2014, file photo, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy discusses proposed regulations with coal industry leaders at Dakota Gasification Synfuels Plant in Beulah, N.D. In a long-expected skirmish, House Republicans are moving to block President Barack Obama’s plan to limit carbon pollution from new power plants. McCarthy and other officials have said the proposed rule _ the first of two major regulations aimed at limiting carbon pollution from power plants _ is based on carbon reduction methods that are "technically feasible" and under development in at least four sites. (AP Photo/Kevin Cederstrom, file)
FILE - This July 1, 2013 file photo smoke rises from the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal burning power plant in in Colstrip, Mont. The Supreme Court on Monday placed limits on the sole Obama administration program already in place to deal with power plant and factory emissions of gases blamed for global warming. The justices said that the Environmental Protection Agency lacks authority in some cases to force companies to evaluate ways to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. This rule applies when a company needs a permit to expand facilities or build new ones that would increase overall pollution. Carbon dioxide is the chief gas linked to global warming. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
President Barack Obama speaks about climate change at Georgetown University in Washington, Tuesday, June 25, 2013. The president is proposing sweeping steps to limit heat-trapping pollution from coal-fired power plants and to boost renewable energy production on federal property, resorting to his executive powers to tackle climate change and sidestepping the partisan gridlock in Congress. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
FILE - In this June 24, 2013, file photo, the Capitol Dome is seen behind the Capitol Power Plant in Washington. Democrats running for election in key states are worried about the political fallout from unprecedented greenhouse-gas limits soon to be announced by fellow Democrat Barack Obama's administration. They wish Obama would wait until after November's elections, but if he doesn't start now the rules won't be in place by the time he leaves office. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2012 file photo, smoke rises in this time exposure image from the stacks of the La Cygne Generating Station coal-fired power plant in La Cygne, Kan. This year the nationís weather has been hotter and more extreme than ever, federal records show. Yet there are two people who arenít talking about it, and they both happen to be running for president. In 2009, President Barack Obama proposed a bill that would have capped power plant carbon dioxide emissions and allowed trading of credits for the right to emit greenhouse gases, but the measure died in Congress. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, Filr)
FILE - In this March 16, 2011 file photo, steam escapes from Exelon Corp.'s nuclear plant in Byron, Ill. Companies that generate electric power with anything other than coal _ and companies that produce cleaner fuels or efficiency technologies are likely to benefit from the Obama Administration's new proposed limits on carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. (AP Photo/Robert Ray, File)
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Most recently in August, Obama announced he would limit carbon emissions from all US power plants by 32% from 2005 levels by 2030.

See the countries contributing most to CO2 emissions below:

All of these examples of Obama's efforts to tackle climate change are just the tip of the melting iceberg.

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