NASA's satellite images of Lake Mead show dramatic drought impact

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NASA's Satellite Images Of Lake Mead Show Dramatic Drought Impact



The drought in California may be much more publicized, but other parts of the U.S. have also been suffering.

NASA recently released images of Lake Mead, one from 2000 and one from this year to show how low the water levels have gotten.

The shrinkage is clear, with the central lake and its three offshoot branches visibly receding.

In fact, the depth is currently at 1,078 feet compared to 1,200 feet 15 years ago and 1,220 feet, at maximum capacity.

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NASA's satellite images of Lake Mead show dramatic drought impact
Wind kicks up dust on an area that was once underwater at the Boulder Harbor boat ramp in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Monday, May 18, 2015, near Boulder City, Nev. Federal water managers are projecting Lake Mead will drop to levels in January 2017 that could force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Wind kicks up dust on an area that was once underwater at the Boulder Harbor boat ramp in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Monday, May 18, 2015, near Boulder City, Nev. Federal water managers are projecting Lake Mead will drop to levels in January 2017 that could force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Plants grow out of dry cracked ground that was once underwater near Boulder Beach in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Monday, May 18, 2015, near Boulder City, Nev. Federal water managers are projecting Lake Mead will drop to levels in January 2017 that could force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Water intake pipes that were once underwater sit above the water line along Lake Mead in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Monday, May 18, 2015, near Boulder City, Nev. Federal water managers are projecting Lake Mead will drop to levels in January 2017 that could force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)
A partially submerged tire sits along the shore of Lake Mead in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Monday, May 18, 2015, near Boulder City, Nev. Federal water managers are projecting Lake Mead will drop to levels in January 2017 that could force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Water intake pipes that were once underwater sit above the water line along Lake Mead in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Monday, May 18, 2015, near Boulder City, Nev. Federal water managers are projecting Lake Mead will drop to levels in January 2017 that could force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Water intake pipes that were once underwater sit above the water line along Lake Mead in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Monday, May 18, 2015, near Boulder City, Nev. Federal water managers are projecting Lake Mead will drop to levels in January 2017 that could force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)
People prepare to launch watercraft as wind kicks up dust on an area that was once underwater at the Boulder Harbor boat ramp in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Monday, May 18, 2015, near Boulder City, Nev. Federal water managers are projecting Lake Mead will drop to levels in January 2017 that could force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Tire tracks cross an area that was once underwater at the Boulder Harbor boat ramp in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Monday, May 18, 2015, near Boulder City, Nev. Federal water managers are projecting Lake Mead will drop to levels in January 2017 that could force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Plants grow out of dry cracked ground that was once underwater near Boulder Beach in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Monday, May 18, 2015, near Boulder City, Nev. Federal water managers are projecting Lake Mead will drop to levels in January 2017 that could force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Water intake pipes that were once underwater sit above the water line along Lake Mead in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Monday, May 18, 2015, near Boulder City, Nev. Federal water managers are projecting Lake Mead will drop to levels in January 2017 that could force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Water intake pipes that were once underwater sit above the water line along Lake Mead in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Monday, May 18, 2015, near Boulder City, Nev. Federal water managers are projecting Lake Mead will drop to levels in January 2017 that could force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)
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The agency also included a chart of the lake's average yearly elevation, showing a mostly steady decline since 2000.

According to their research, droughts during the mid-1950s and 1960s resulted in water losses, but the current situation marks a 10-year slide to the lowest level since it was filled in the 1930
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