Maryland governor: 95 percent of cancer gone

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Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan Begins Chemotherapy

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — After eight weeks of intensive treatment, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan says 95 percent of his cancer is gone.

The Republican governor told The Washington Post he still has some remnants of the dozens of tumors doctors found two months ago, "but it's dead."

Hogan has remained active through his treatment for B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which includes five-day stays at University of Maryland Medical Center every three weeks. But the self-described workaholic and "touchy-feely kind of guy" says he's had to cut back his hours and avoid contact with people because of his weakened immune system.

Hogan says doctors were shocked by his results and they hope his next scan shows all his tumors are gone. Regardless of the results, Hogan will need to complete all six rounds of his 18-week treatment.

Check out pictures of Gov. Hogan:

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Maryland Governor Larry Hogan
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Maryland governor: 95 percent of cancer gone
ANNAPOLIS, MD- AUGUST 18: Maryland Governor Larry Hogan is in good spirits as he is undergoing treatment for an aggressive non-Hodgkins lymphoma. He is photographed in his office in Annapolis, Maryland on August 18, 2015. (Photo by Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan poses at Baltimore City Detention Center, Thursday, July 30, 2015, in Baltimore, at the end of a news conference to announce his plan to immediately shut down the jail. Hogan, who announced in June he has non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, was making light of a picture of him that his office posted on Facebook showing his hair loss after a second round of chemotheraphy. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND - JULY 16: From left to right, First Lady Yumi Hogan, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan and Lt. Governor Boyd Rutherford talk before addressing the crowd at the cookout on Thursday, July 16, 2015. Maryland Governor Larry Hogan and First Lady Yumi Hogan host the 8th annual Buy Local Cookout at Government House and officially recognized Marylands Buy Local Challenge Week, which encourages Marylanders to incorporate at least one locally grown, produced or harvested product into their meals each day. Governor Hogan officially declared July 18-26 as Buy Local Challenge Week to raise awareness about the benefits of local farms and food so that Marylanders will become more familiar and more frequent consumers of fresh, local products. (Photo by Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan speaks at a news conference to discuss the state's transportation infrastructure in Annapolis, Md., Thursday, June 25, 2015. Hogan said the state will contribute $168 million to the planned Purple Line rail system in the Washington suburbs instead of nearly $700 million. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan claps during Mass at St. Peter Claver Catholic Church, Sunday, May 3, 2015, in Baltimore. Hogan called for Sunday to be a statewide “Day of Prayer and Peace" following demonstrations in response to the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Larry Hogan, governor of Maryland, poses for photographs at a media event before boarding the L0 series magnetic levitation (maglev) train, developed by Central Japan Railway Co. (JR Central), for a trial run at the Yamanashi Maglev Test Track site in Tsuru, Yamanashi Prefecture, Japan, on Thursday, June 4, 2015. JR Central hopes to introduce maglev train simultaneously in Japan and U.S., Honorary Chairman Yoshiyuki Kasai said after riding the Maglev train with Hogan outside Tokyo. Photographer: Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images
BALTIMORE, MD - MAY 3: Gov. Larry Hogan greets parishoners after Baltimore Archbishop William Lori celebrates Mass at St. Peter Claver, on May, 03, 2015 in Baltimore, MD. (Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Larry Hogan, governor of Maryland, front right, and his wife Yumi Hogan, front left, sit on board the L0 series magnetic levitation (maglev) train, developed by Central Japan Railway Co., as it travels during a trial run at the Yamanashi Maglev Test Track site in Tsuru, Yamanashi Prefecture, Japan, on Thursday, June 4, 2015. JR Central hopes to introduce maglev train simultaneously in Japan and U.S., Honorary Chairman Yoshiyuki Kasai said after riding the Maglev train with Hogan outside Tokyo. Photographer: Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images
BALTIMORE, MD - APRIL 28: Maryland Governor Larry Hogan speaks at a press conference after riots broke out yesterday after the funeral of Freddie Gray, on April 28, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
ANNAPOLIS MD - FEBRUARY 26: Maryland Governor Larry Hogan and First Lady Yumi Hogan welcome guests to a Lunar New Year Celebration on February 26, 2015, at Government House in Annapolis, MD. (Photo by Mary F. Calvert For The Washington Post via Getty Images)
ANNAPOLIS, MD - FEBRUARY 4: Maryland Speaker of the House Mike Busch (R) and Senate President Mike Miller (L) greet newly inaugurated Maryland Governor Larry Hogan at his first State of the State address to lawmakers in Annapolis, MD on February 4, 2015. The Republican governor addressed a Democrat-dominated legislature and may outline some of his financial goals and cutbacks to remedy the budget shortfall. (Photo by Linda Davidson / The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LANDOVER, MD - NOVEMBER 25: Everette Brown, left, and Governor Elect Larry Hogan, center, prepare to distribute packages as the Washington Redskins Charitable Foundation gives away turkeys on November, 25, 2014 in Landover, MD. (Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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