Burial at sea planned for civil rights leader Julian Bond

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Civil Rights Champion Julian Bond Dies at Age 75


ATLANTA (AP) — Relatives of civil rights leader Julian Bond say they're honoring his wishes to be cremated and his ashes spread in the Gulf of Mexico.

Family members say a burial at sea will occur at 2 p.m. CDT Saturday in the Gulf in a private ceremony.

Bond died last Saturday in Fort Walton Beach, Florida. He was 75. His wife, Pamela Horowitz, said her husband had circulatory problems.

Horowitz and other relatives say they're inviting people to gather at a body of water near their homes and spread flower petals on the water at 2 p.m. CDT Saturday.

See Julian Bond's life in photos:

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Civil rights leader Julian Bond
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Burial at sea planned for civil rights leader Julian Bond
GOLETA, CA - DECEMBER 06: Julian Bond attends the 'Selma' and the Legends Who Paved the Way gala at Bacara Resort on December 6, 2014 in Goleta, California. (Photo by Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 19: Pamela Horowitz and Julian Bond attend '5 to 7' premiere during the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival at SVA Theater on April 19, 2014 in New York City. (Photo by Gilbert Carrasquillo/FilmMagic)
AUSTIN, TX - APRIL 9: Julian Bond gives a reading prior to a speech by former President Bill Clinton on the second day of the Civil Rights Summit at the LBJ Presidential Library April 9, 2014 in Austin, Texas. The summit is marking the 50th anniversary of the passing of the Civil Rights Act legislation, with U.S. President Barack Obama making the keynote speech on April 10. At right is Luci Baines Jonson, daughter of former President Lyndon Johnson. (Photo by Deborah Cannon-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 20: Julian Bond speaks at The 2013 Peace Ball: Voices of Hope And Resistance at Arena Stage on January 20, 2013 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Earl Gibson III/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - AUGUST 18: Julian Bond presents the Beacon of Life award to John Lewis at the 2012 MLB Beacon Awards Luncheon presented by Belk during the Delta Civil Rights Game weekend hosted by the Atlanta Braves on August 18, 2012 at the Hyatt Regency in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Pouya Dianat/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
AUSTIN, TX - APRIL 9: Julian Bond, former Chairman, NAACP (L) looks on as U.S. Rep. John Lewis (R) makes a point during the panel, Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement: Views from the Front Line, on the second day of the Civil Rights Summit at the LBJ Presidential Library April 9, 2014 in Austin, Texas. The summit is marking the 50th anniversary of the passing of the Civil Rights Act legislation, with U.S. President Barack Obama making the keynote speech on April 10. (Photo by Rodolfo Gonzalez-Pool/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 02: Jesse Jackson and Julian Bond attend the 2012 Bond Gala at The Plaza Hotel on May 2, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/WireImage)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 28: Julian Bond and Aretha Franklin pose backstage at the hit musical 'Porgy and Bess' on Broadway at The Richard Rogers Theater on March 28, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Bruce Glikas/FilmMagic)
Julian Bond, Civil Rights activist, now a professor at American University is photographed in Washington, D.C., on June 21, 2011. Says Bond, 'My greatest memory of the march isn't Dr. King's speech. I'd heard him speak many times before. It was giving a Coke to Sammy Davis Jr. and him saying, Thanks kid.'
FILE- In this April 10, 2014, file photo, social activist Julian Bond hugs Luci Baines Johnson, the younger daughter of President Lyndon Baines Johnson after singing "We Shall Overcome" during the Civil Rights Summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act in Austin, Texas. Bond, a civil rights activist and longtime board chairman of the NAACP, died Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. He was 75. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster File)
FILE- In this July 8, 2007, file photo shows NAACP Chairman Julian Bond addresses the civil rights organization's annual convention in Detroit. Bond, a civil rights activist and longtime board chairman of the NAACP, died Saturday, Aug. 15, 2015, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. He was 75. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
Shadows of board members are cast on the rear wall as former NAACP chairman Julian Bond listens to a speaker during a news conference Saturday, Feb. 20, 2010 in New York. The NAACP elected Roslyn Brock as the new chairman during their annual meeting.(AP Photo/Stephen Chernin)
Georgia legislator Julian Bond addresses a Washington news conference, Jan. 2, 1973 in Washington, which condemned American bombing of North Vietnam. Participants said a civilian hospital near Hanoi was destroyed. (AP Photo)
Julian Bond of the Georgia state legislature and civil rights leader is seen in 1968. (AP Photo)
Civil rights leader and Georgia State Legislature member Julian Bond is seen, 1970. (AP Photo)
Julian Bond, who won three elections and a Supreme Court decision, reflects on a newsman?s question after his arrival at Atlanta, Dec. 5, 1966. The high court said the Georgia House erred in denying Bond his seat because of his views on Viet Nam conflict. (AP Photo)
State Rep. Julian Bond, right, leader of an insurgent Georgia group, and some of his followers discuss developments on the floor of the Democratic National Convention, August 27, 1968 in Chicago as his bid to unseat a delegation headed by Gov. Lester G. Maddox was rejected on a roll call vote. The convention then adjourned without acting on the credentials committee?s proposal for the Bond and Maddox delegations to share Georgia?s votes. (AP Photo)
Julian Bond, Georgian state legislator, in Chicago, Il. Aug. 29, 1968 withdrew his name from consideration as a vice presidential candidate after it was entered in nomination at the Democratic National Convention last night. He said he wasn't old enough. (AP Photo)
Julian Bond, Black leader shown during press conference, Dec. 14, 1966. (AP Photo)
Julian Bond, center, the young Atlanta African American who was barred from his seat in the Georgia House of Representatives, shakes hands with New York's new mayor, John V. Lindsay, right, at City Hall in New York, Jan. 21, 1966. During a 20-minute talk, Lindsay told Bond, who was taken the refusal to seat him to district court that "I believe it should be handled as a first amendment case, the way it is being handled." Bond has criticized the American involvement in Vietnam. Shown at left is James Forman, Executive Director of Student Non-Violent Co-ordinating Committee. (AP Photo)
Georgia State Legislator Julian Bond delivers the closing address to the 28th annual National Conference on Citizenship, Monday, Sept. 18, 1973 in Washington. (AP PhotoHarvey Georges)
John E. Jacob, right, president of the National Urban League, chats with State Sen. Julian Bond (D-Atlanta) before delivering the keynote address to the 13th Annual Seminar of the League?s Black Executive Exchange Program in Atlanta, June 17, 1982. (AP Photo/Joe Holloway, Jr.)
State Sen. Julian Bond shares a smile with campaign supporter Carolyn Long Banks at his hotel in Atlanta, Tuesday, August 13, 1986 as he awaits the returns on his race for the Democratic nomination for the U.S. 5th Congressional seat vacated by Wyche Fowler. (AP Photo/Ric Feld)
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Horowitz said the family will also announce plans for a public memorial celebration soon.

Bond spent most of his life struggling for civil rights, from organizing student groups to serving in several political and leadership positions.

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