This company wants to make license plates for drones

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Drones, Drones, and Drones


Drones are constantly at the center of the stage, raising controversy between their widespread amateur use and all the issues that come with a large scale implementation of plans to use unmanned quadcopters for commercial purposes. While many are enthusiastic about what they see as a technology that can revolutionize the way we move things and people, or at least enjoy seeing the futuristic-looking devices hovering over our heads, others have raised opposing views on their use.

In an attempt to ease the transition into an environment where drones are considered a safe system, a team of engineers is developing "LightCense," a project that will allow us to identify these flying devices and their pilots, just like we use license plates for cars.



LightCense uses a combination of colors that blink in sequence and mark the "identity" of the specific drone. This is a very simple feature that allows people to simply look at the colors and memorize the sequence in case they need to report any unlawful or suspicious activity. On top of this an app can use your phone camera to "recognize" the pattern and tell you the drone's ID and the pilot's name.

What do you think about drones regulation?



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Potentially harmful technologies: drones, self driving cars, hoverboards
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This company wants to make license plates for drones
Google's self-driving Lexus car drives along street during a demonstration at Google campus on Wednesday, May 13, 2015, in Mountain View, Calif. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)
In this May 13, 2015 photo, Google's new self-driving prototype car is presented during a demonstration at the Google campus in Mountain View, Calif. The car, which needs no gas pedal or steering wheel, will make its debut on public roads this summer. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)
People exit Daimler's Freightliner Inspiration self-driving truck after a demonstration Wednesday, May 6, 2015, in Las Vegas. Although much attention has been paid to autonomous vehicles being developed by Google and traditional car companies, Daimler believes that automated tractor-trailers will be rolling along highways before self-driving cars are cruising around the suburbs. (AP Photo/John Locher)
In this photo taken Wednesday, May 14, 2014, a camera is shown inside a Google self-driving car on exhibit at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif. Four years ago, the Google team developing cars which can drive themselves became convinced that, sooner than later, the technology would be ready for the masses. There was just one problem: Driverless cars almost certainly were illegal.(AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
Some of the computer equipment that is used for autonomous operation is seen in a storage area in this Cadillac SRX that was modified by Carnegie Mellon University as it is parked in a lot in Cranberry, Pa., Butler County, on Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013. U.S. Rep. Bill Shuster, and Barry Schoch, secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, then rode in the self-driven car that went along local roads and highways operated by a computer that used inputs from radars, laser rangefinders, and infrared cameras as it made a 33-mile trip to the Pittsburgh International Airport. A Carnegie Mellon engineer was in the driver's seat as a safety precaution. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
Graphic shows some details on the Freightliner’s first autopilot driverless truck; 2c x 3 inches; 96.3 mm x 76 mm;
This handout photo provided by the US Secret Service appears to be a Parrot BeBop drone, seen in Lafayette Park across from the White House in Washington, Thursday, May 14, 2015. The U.S. Secret Service apprehended a man who was flying the small drone Thursday afternoon in a park outside the White House. (US Secret Service via AP)
File - In this Oct. 15, 2014, file photo, a drone called the RMAX, a remotely piloted helicopter, sprays water over grapevines during a demonstration of it's aerial application capabilities at the University of California, Davis' Oakville Station test vineyard in Oakville, Calif. The drone large enough to carry tanks of fertilizers and pesticides has won rare approval from federal authorities to spray crops in the United States, officials said Tuesday, May 5, 2015. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
FILE - In this June 6, 2013 file photo, University of North Dakota aviation student Logan Lass lifts a lightweight drone used in training at the school's unmanned aircraft program in Grand Forks, N.D. Construction is schedule to begin in May 2015 for the nation’s first unmanned aircraft business park, called Grand Sky, to be located at nearby Grand Forks Air Force Base. It will have access to talent at the base, the UND aerospace school and a nearby technical school. The 1.2 million-square-foot park will have space for hangars, offices, shops, laboratories and data centers. (AP Photo/Dave Kolpack, File)
In this photo taken Thursday, March 19, 2015, a six-bladed drone casts a shadow on a heavily looted 5,000-year-old cemetery, known as Fifa, in southern Jordan. At the sprawling Bronze Age site, archaeologists have developed a unique way of peering into the murky world of antiquities looting: With aerial photographs taken by the drone, researchers are mapping exactly where and roughly when new tombs were robbed. (AP Photo/Sam McNeil)
Romeo Durscher, director of education for drone-maker DJI, flies one of his company's products Tuesday, March 10, 2015, in Davenport , Calif. Top drone-makers, along with investors, regulators and inventors, are gathering in one of the most popular regions for outdoor activity in the U.S., California’s Central Coast, to show off their devices, hear about new uses for airborne robots, and hit the waves and trails at the Drones Data X Conference in Santa Cruz, Calif., from May 1 to 3, 2015. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
This handout photo provided by the US Secret Service shows the drone that crashed onto the White House grounds in Washington, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. A small drone flying low to the ground crashed onto the White House grounds before dawn Monday, triggering a major emergency response and raising fresh questions about security at the presidential mansion. A man later came forward to say he was responsible and didn't mean to fly it over the complex. The man contacted the Secret Service after reports of the crash spread in the media, a U.S. official said. The man told the agency that he had been flying the drone recreationally. The man is a Washington resident and is cooperating with investigators. (AP Photo/US Secret Service)
In this Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013, photo, Decatur Self Storage's array of solar cells are installed on the flat roof of the building as they capture solar energy and convert it to electrical energy for the storage facility, in in Decatur, Ga. Owner Mike Easterwood also returns excess electricity to the Georgia Power Company electrical grid in exchange for a reduced monthly power rate. (AP Photo/David Tulis)
KNUTSFORD, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 13: A youth poses as he rides a hoverboard, which are also known as self-balancing scooters and balance boards, on October 13, 2015 in Knutsford, England. The British Crown Prosecution Service have declared that the devices are illegal as they are are too unsafe to ride on the road, and too dangerous to ride on the pavement. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
In this Oct. 30, 2014 photo, Arx Pax engineer Garrett Foshay stands over a Hendo Hoverboard in Los Gatos, Calif. Skateboarding is going airborne this fall with the launch of the first real commercially marketed hoverboard which uses magnetics to float about an inch off the ground. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
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