Police very confused by people sneaking into stinky sewer

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The New York City Police Department is still somewhat baffled by the fact it had to arrest three somewhat-stinky and muck-covered men who broke into the sewer and went on a treasure hunt for four hours on Wednesday. "God knows what they were looking for, and damn sure I wouldn't be crawling through the sewers of New York," Police Commissioner Bill Bratton told reporters.

Residents were weirded out by the three men not-so-unobtrusively trying to lift a manhole cover in Flatbush, and called the police. One person told the New York Times, "It was like Indiana Jones in Brooklyn." One of the men worked part-time for the Department of Environmental Protection, and is accused of opening the manhole cover for his friends — maybe several times before the adventure that led to their arrest.

Bratton said that the police department had no plans to make it harder to access the fetid underbelly of the city. "We're not going to weld them all shut. Any idiot that wants to crawl below the streets unfortunately can do it by prying."

The men, armed with metal detectors, did not find anything valuable while exploring — no diamonds, nor secret mail caches, misplaced family fortunes, or mutant reptiles. On the other hand, they did not find anything intensely undesirable, either — noxious gases, a body, an alligator — except for the police and the waste left behind by a city with millions of people in it.

Click through the photos below to see cool finds from other treasure hunts:

6 PHOTOS
Spanish treasure recovered
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Police very confused by people sneaking into stinky sewer
In this June 18, 2015 photo, a silver bar sits on display, in New York. The bar, which weighs 80 pounds, was just a portion of 40 tons of gold and silver pulled from the 400-year-old Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Atocha wreckage and will be auctioned off by Guernsey's next month. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
In this Thursday, June 18, 2015 photo, a gold crucifix with inlaid Colombian emerald jewels sits on display in New York. The crucifix was one of many pieces of jewelry pulled from the 400-year-old wreckage of the Nuestra Senora de Atocha Spanish galleon and will be one of forty select items auctioned off by Guernsey's next month. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
In this June 18, 2015 photo, a gold spoon sits on display, in New York. The spoon, thought to be used by priests during Communion to convert South American natives, was one of many items pulled from the 400-year-old Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Atocha wreckage and will be auctioned off by Guernsey's next month. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
In this June 18, 2015 photo, a gold bar sits on display in New York. The bar, which was just a portion of 40 tons of gold and silver pulled from the 400-year-old Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Atocha wreckage, will be one of forty select items from the ship auctioned off by Guernsey's next month. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
In this June 18, 2015 photo, a Bezoar Stone sits on display, in New York. The pendant, which was believed to test for poisons and toxins in liquids, is one of many items pulled from the 400-year-old Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Atocha wreckage and will be auctioned off by Guernsey's next month. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
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