Today in History: Skeleton of T-Rex found in 1990

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This Day In History: 08/12/1990 - Skeleton of T-Rex Discovered

On August 12, 1990, Susan Hendrickson -- a fossil hunter -- discovered three huge bones protruding out of a cliff near Faith, South Dakota.

Those burned turned out to be part of the largest ever T-Rex skeleton to ever be discovered, a 65 million-year-old specimen which was eventually named Sue.

When Sue's skeleton was found, it was over 90 percent complete, with extremely well-preserved bones.

The Black Hills Institute of Geological research, Hendrickson's employer, paid the land's owner $500 for the right to excavate the skeleton.

Eventually, in May 2000, Sue's skeleton went on display at the Field Museum.

This discovery was huge for the world of discovery and dinosaur bone excavation, marking Sue as a monumental icon in dinosaur history.

See the gallery below for photos of Sue the T-Rex:

17 PHOTOS
Sue the T-Rex
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Today in History: Skeleton of T-Rex found in 1990
Paleontological Bruce Schumacher stands alongside the fossilized bones of a Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton dubbed 'Sue' May, 1998 at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, IL. The T. rex bones named for Sue Hendrickson, the fossil hunter who found her in 1990, are unveiled May 17, 2000 at the Field Museum of Natural History. Sue stands 13 feet tall at the hips and stretches 41 feet long with teeth as long as a human for arm. (Photo by Jean-Marc Gibbous/Liaison)
Paleontologists prepare and clean the fossilized bones of a Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton dubbed 'Sue' May, 1998 at the Field Museum of Natural History''s preparation lab in Chicago, IL. The T. rex bones named for Sue Hendrickson, the fossil hunter who found her in 1990 are unveiled May 17, 2000 at the Field Museum of Natural History. Sue stands 13 feet tall at the hips and stretches 41 feet long with teeth as long as a human forearm. (Photo by Jean-Marc Giboux/Liaison)
TOKYO, JAPAN: The skull of the world's largest Tyrannosaurus Rex, named Sue, is placed onto its skeleton to prepare it for display at the Dinosaur Expo 2005 at the National Science Museum in Tokyo, 14 March 2005. Sue was discovered by fossil hunter Sue Hendrickson in 1990 and purchased by the Field Museum in Chicago at public auction in 1997. (Photo credit: TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
TOKYO, JAPAN: The skull of the world's largest Tyrannosaurus Rex, named Sue, is placed onto its skeleton as workers prepare it for display in the Dinosaur Expo 2005 at the National Science Museum in Tokyo, 14 March 2005. Sue was discovered by fossil hunter Sue Hendrickson in 1990 and purchased by the Field Museum in Chicago at public auction in 1997. (Photo credit: TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
TOKYO, JAPAN: The skeleton of the world's largest Tyrannosaurus Rex, named Sue (R), is displayed beside a Tarbosaurus from Mongolia (L) during a press preview of the Dinosaur Expo 2005 at the National Science Museum in Tokyo, 14 March 2005. Sue was discovered by fossil hunter Sue Hendrickson in 1990 and purchased by the Field Museum in Chicago at public auction in 1997.  (Photo credit: TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
In this Sept. 119, 2013 file photo, a traveling replica of a Tyrannosaurus rex named Sue is displayed at the Washington Pavilion's Kirby Science Discovery Center in Sioux Falls, S.D. A movie screened in Hill City, S.D., on Saturday, May 3, 2014, told the story of the Tyrannosaurus caught in a complex legal battle over ownership. (AP Photo/Dirk Lammers)
Kevin Krudwig of Ontario, Canada, touches up repairs made to SUE, a 42-foot-long cast skeleton of a Tyrannosaurus rex, which is the centerpiece of a national touring exhibit at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Thursday, Nov. 2, 2000, in Los Angeles. The cast, which is the largest, best-preserved and most complete T. rex ever discovered, will go on public display Nov. 18, 2000. (AP Photo/Rene Macura)
A worker moves a shipping case at the Museum of Natural Science after installing Sue, claimed to be the largest, most complete, and best preserved Tyrannosaurus rex, in Halifax on Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2011. Sue is named for paleontologist Sue Hendrickson, who discovered the dinosaur remains during a fossil-hunting trip in the summer of 1990. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Andrew Vaughan)
Their Imperial Highnesses Prince and Princess Hitachi walk past the foot of Sue, the largest most complete T-rex fossil accompanied by John W. McCarter, center, President and CEO of the Field Museum Friday, Sept. 30, 2005, during a tour of the museum on their first day of a three day visit to Chicago. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
David Hanke, an officer from the Exhibition Department of the Field Museum in the US city of Chicago, makes final touches on the skull of the world's largest Tyrannosaurus Rex, Sue, on display at the Dinosaur Expo 2005 at the National Science Museum in Tokyo, 14 March 2005. Sue was discovered by fossil hunter Sue Hendrickson in 1990 and purchased by the Field Museum in Chicago at public auction in 1997. (Photo credit: TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 12: Geologist Bill Simpson cleans Sue, a 67-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex on display at the Field Museum on November 12, 2013 in Chicago, Illinois. Sue is the largest, most complete, and best preserved T. Rex ever discovered. Simpson carefully cleans the skeleton twice a year. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - APRIL 1: Sue, one of the largest, most extensive and best-preserved Tyrannosaurus rex specimens ever found, is displayed as part of the permanent collection at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, Illinois Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Named after Sue Hendrickson, the paleontologist who discovered the fossil in 1990, it was acquired at auction by the Field Museum in 1997 for $8.36 million, the highest amount ever paid for a dinosaur fossil. The Smithsonian Institution lost to the Field Museum and has been trying to buy a mainly complete fossil ever since. The Smithsonian recently bought a Tyrannosaurus rex and will have it in the museum by 2015. (Photo by Brett T. Roseman for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Worlds largest T Rex being assembled at the Natural History Museum. Sue is the largest, best preserved and most complete Tyrannosaurus rex dinosaur ever discovered. Pic. shows the head of T-–Rex. (Photo by Lawrence K. Ho/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
Sue, the largest and most complete Tyrannosaurus rex ever found, is shown on display May 17, 2000 at the Field Museum in Chicago. The fossil was found by Susan Hendrickson in South Dakota in 1990 and was acquired by The Field Museum in 1997 for $8.4 million at Sotheby's auction house in New York. A consortium including McDonald's Corporation and Walt Disney World Resort helped the Museum purchase Sue. (Photo by Tim Boyle/Newsmakers)
CHICAGO, IL - APRIL 1: Visitors to the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, Illinois admire Sue, one of the largest, most extensive and best-preserved Tyrannosaurus rex specimens ever found, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Named after Sue Hendrickson, the paleontologist who discovered the fossil in 1990, it was acquired at auction by the Field Museum in 1997 for $8.36 million, the highest amount ever paid for a dinosaur fossil. The Smithsonian Institution lost to the Field Museum and has been trying to buy a mainly complete fossil ever since. The Smithsonian recently bought a Tyrannosaurus rex and will have it in the museum by 2015. (Photo by Brett T. Roseman for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 12: Geologist Bill Simpson cleans the tail of Sue, a 67-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex on display at the Field Museum on November 12, 2013 in Chicago, Illinois. Sue is the largest, most complete, and best preserved T. Rex ever discovered. Simpson carefully cleans the skeleton twice a year. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
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