Nik Wallenda successfully completes longest high-wire walk

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Nik Wallenda Successfully Completes Longest High-Wire Walk


WEST ALLIS, Wisc. (FOX6) -- On Tuesday evening, August 11th, world-famous wire walker Nik Wallenda successfully completed his longest walk EVER at the Wisconsin State Fair.

Ahead of the wire walk, there was one question on the minds of nearly everyone gathered at the Milwaukee Mile: Will he make it?

"What if he falls? You just don't know what's going to happen and I think that's exciting," said Mary Downing, an attendee of the State Fair.

"I understand this is gonna be the longest walk that he's ever done," Amber Daugherty, another onlooker, said.

Wallenda's death-defying wire walk was the main event at the Wisconsin State Fair on Tuesday evening.

See more of Wallenda's recent stunts:

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Nik Wallenda successfully completes longest high-wire walk
Daredevil performer Nik Wallenda waves to a crowd below after he walked untethered along the rim of the Orlando Eye, the city's new, 400-foot observation wheel, Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in Orlando, Fla. The walk is being done in advance of next month's public opening of the attraction. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
Daredevil performer Nik Wallenda waves during a news conference after he walked untethered along the rim of the Orlando Eye, the city's new, 400-foot observation wheel, Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in Orlando, Fla. The walk is being done in advance of next month's public opening of the attraction. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR LIBERTY SCIENCE CENTER - Daredevil Nik Wallenda takes the first official climb on the Infinity Climber at Liberty Science Center on Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014, in Jersey City, NJ. (Photo by Scott Roth/Invision for Liberty Science Center/AP Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 13: Nik Wallenda speaks at a press conference where he revealed his next feat will take place on April 29, 2015 at the soon-to-be-unveiled Orlando Eye, located in Orlando, Florida. Wallenda will attempt to walk on top of the giant observation wheel without a tether and without a wire while it is moving. Standing 400 feet tall, the Orlando Eye forms part of the I-Drive 360 entertainment complex, which celebrates its grand opening this month and is located in the heart of Orlando's newly revitalized International 'I-Drive' District. The press conference took place on April 13, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Steve Mack/FilmMagic)
Nik Wallenda, top, walks the tightrope above Charlotte Motor Speedway on Saturday, October 12, 2013, with his sister, Lijana, 140 feet above pit road during the pre-race show at the Bank of America 500 NASCAR Sprint Cup race in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Jeff Willhelm/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
Nik Wallenda, top, walks the tightrope above Charlotte Motor Speedway on Saturday, October 12, 2013, with his sister, Lijana, 140 feet above pit road during the pre-race show at the Bank of America 500 NASCAR Sprint Cup race in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Davie Hinshaw/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
Nik Wallenda walks the tightrope above Charlotte Motor Speedway on Saturday, October 12, 2013, with his sister, Lijana, 140 feet above pit road during the pre-race show at the Bank of America 500 NASCAR Sprint Cup race in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Davie Hinshaw/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
GRAND CANYON, AZ - JUNE 22: Nik Wallenda practices during a training session before his historic high wire walk over the Grand Canyon at The Grand Canyon on June 22, 2013 in Grand Canyon, Arizona. (Photo by Tim Boyles/Getty Images)
GRAND CANYON, AZ - JUNE 22: Nik Wallenda looks over the Grand Canyon during a training session before his historic high wire walk over the Grand Canyon at The Grand Canyon on June 22, 2013 in Grand Canyon, Arizona. (Photo by Tim Boyles/Getty Images)
Nik Wallenda walks without any harnesses or any safety precautions on a tightrope stretched across the Little Colorado River Gorge near the Grand Canyon on June 23, 2013. The two-inch (five-centimeter) thick wireline starting from a Navajo reservation just outside of the Grand Canyon National Park is suspended 1,500 feet (450 meters) above the ground (about 50 feet higher than the Empire State Building) and is 1,400 feet long (about the length of five football fields). US daredevil Nik Wallenda became the first man to cross the Grand Canyon on a tightrope Sunday, completing his latest record-breaking feat in just under 23 minutes.AFP PHOTO /JOE KLAMAR (Photo credit should read JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)
Nik Wallenda speaks at a press conference after he crossed the Little Colorado River Gorge on a tiderope near the Grand Canyon on June 23, 2013. The two-inch (five-centimeter) thick wireline starting from a Navajo reservation just outside of the Grand Canyon National Park is suspended 1,500 feet (450 meters) above the ground (about 50 feet higher than the Empire State Building) and is 1,400 feet long (about the length of five football fields). US daredevil Nik Wallenda became the first man to cross the Grand Canyon on a tightrope Sunday, completing his latest record-breaking feat in just under 23 minutes. AFP PHOTO /JOE KLAMAR (Photo credit should read JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)
A unidentified Navajo people protests along highway near Cameron, Arizona on June 23, 2013, to protest Florida aerialist Nik Wallenda's tightrope walk over the Little Colorado River Gorge. Wallenda plans to perform the stunt without a safety harness on the Navajo reservation. AFP PHOTO /JOE KLAMAR (Photo credit should read JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)
GRAND CANYON, AZ - JUNE 23: Nik Wallenda looks over the Grand Canyon following his historic walk at The Grand Canyon on June 23, 2013 in Grand Canyon, Arizona. (Photo by Tim Boyles/Getty Images)
GRAND CANYON, AZ - JUNE 23: Nik Wallenda walks a high wire over the Grand Canyon at The Grand Canyon on June 23, 2013 in Grand Canyon, Arizona. (Photo by Tim Boyles/Getty Images)
GRAND CANYON, AZ - JUNE 23: Nik Wallenda walks a high wire over the Grand Canyon at The Grand Canyon on June 23, 2013 in Grand Canyon, Arizona. (Photo by Tim Boyles/Getty Images)
SARASOTA, FL - JUNE 06: Nik Wallenda trains for his upcoming walk across the Grand Canyon during Tropical Storm Andrea on June 6, 2013 in Sarasota, Florida. (Photo by Tim Boyles/Getty Images)
SARASOTA, FL - JUNE 06: Nik Wallenda trains for his upcoming walk across the Grand Canyon during Tropical Storm Andrea on June 6, 2013 in Sarasota, Florida. (Photo by Tim Boyles/Getty Images)
SARASOTA, FL - JUNE 06: Nik Wallenda trains for his upcoming walk across the Grand Canyon during Tropical Storm Andrea on June 6, 2013 in Sarasota, Florida. (Photo by Tim Boyles/Getty Images)
SARASOTA, FL - JUNE 06: Nik Wallenda trains for his upcoming walk across the Grand Canyon during Tropical Storm Andrea on June 6, 2013 in Sarasota, Florida. (Photo by Tim Boyles/Getty Images)
SARASOTA, FL - JUNE 06: Nik Wallenda trains for his upcoming walk across the Grand Canyon during Tropical Storm Andrea on June 6, 2013 in Sarasota, Florida. (Photo by Tim Boyles/Getty Images)
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From 1:30 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. Monday morning, Wallenda's crew was out near the Milwaukee Mile -- assembling the 1,560-foot-long high wire. The wire is the width of a nickel.

Wallenda says the hardest part of any wire-walking stunt is just taking that first step, because every wire feels different. On Monday, he said the key Tuesday would be endurance.

"It will take a lot of endurance. The first half of that cable is downhill, which is intimidating -- that's a good way to describe it. I will feel alive when I get on that wire. That's where I feel at home," Wallenda said.

On the ground were more than 100 volunteers holding tight to wires.

"It's really kind of cool to be able to be a part of it. Just lean back and sit on the ropes and keep it tight for him as he walks by," Paige Dellisse said.

There seemed to be more nerves among the crowd on Tuesday evening than up on the high wire.

"I was pretty sure somebody was going to die. Probably him -- but you know, maybe somebody else -- but definitely him," one spectator said.

After about 40 minutes, Wallenda calmly reached the end of the wire -- and the answer to everyone's question was answered: He made it.

Nik Wallenda is a seventh-generation member of a famous family of daredevils. He's made a name for himself -- walking across Niagara Falls and between skyscrapers in Chicago, among other places.

His longest walk prior to the walk at the Wisconsin State Fair was across the Grand Canyon. During that walk, Wallenda experienced 52 miles-per-hour wind gusts.

"I've got dreams of walking over an active volcano -- of course always outdoing myself in distance and height," Wallenda said.

The last Wallenda to perform in the Milwaukee area was Karl Wallenda in July of 1974.

"That-s my great-grandfather," Wallenda said. "Very cool."

Karl Wallenda walked across County Stadium -- and he even did a handstand on the high wire!

"That was his thing. That was what my great-grandfather did. He always did a handstand. I do everything I do to really honor my ancestors and to honor him," Wallenda said.

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