Tabasco is opening an all-hot-sauce restaurant next week

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10 Things You May Not Know About Tabasco

BY: NY MAG

This totally could be a Stefon recommendation: America's hottest new restaurant is 1868, located on its own private island in Louisiana and owned by the reclusive McIlhenny clan, and it has all-Tabasco everything.

The notoriously tight-lipped family kept the news quiet for a while, but next Monday the five-generation hot-sauce maker (founded in 1868) is finally diving into the restaurant business by opening an awesome-sounding hot-sauce-themed restaurant on Avery Island. The Advertiser got a look at the menu and reports that the fare will be Cajun-heavy at first, and of course make liberal use of the seven different types of Tabasco in entrées that include riffs on standards like crawfish étouffée, boudin, and maque choux, as well as spicy hot-dogs, nachos, meatballs, and ice cream.

There are plans down the road to diversify the cuisine in order to "encourage international tourists to use Tabasco in everyday meals back home." (Hello, bowls of fiery spaghetti.) Since we now know a regular diet of spicy foods reduces the risk of early death, consider this worth the trek.

[Advertiser]

We can't wait for the grand opening! Here's why:

8 PHOTOS
We <3 Tabasco Sauce
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Tabasco is opening an all-hot-sauce restaurant next week

People have been using hot and spicy seasonings in their food for more than 6,000 years according to archaeologists.

(via Fill Your Plate)

Photo Credit: OMAR TORRES via Getty Images

Christopher Columbus discovered chili peppers when he discovered the Americas in 1493.

(via Fill Your Plate)

Photo Credit: AP

There are 140 varieties of chili peppers grown in Mexico alone.

(via Fill Your Plate)

Photo Credit: AP

August 19th is National Hot & Spicy Food Day here in the U.S. and International Hot & Spicy Food Day is held in January.

(via Fill Your Plate)

Photo Credit: AP

People who love fiery food have been dubbed pyro-gourmaniacs.

(via Fill Your Plate)

Photo Credit: Getty Images

One of the most common reactions to imbibing hot, fiery food is to sweat which is referred to as gustatory perspiration.

(via Fill Your Plate)

Photo Credit: Getty Images

The heat produced by spices or foods is measured in Scoville Heat Units (SHU), which were originally created by Wilbur Scoville who pioneered the process for measuring the heat produced by a food or spice. Today this test is conducted using a liquid chromatographer.

(via Fill Your Plate)

Photo Credit: Getty Images

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