Glacier loss occurring at unprecedented accelerated rate

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Glacier Loss Occurring At Unprecedented Accelerated Rate
A newly published study led and authored by the director of the World Glacier Monitoring Service reports that glacier melting is now occurring at an unprecedented accelerated rate.

The examination of loss rates involved comparing readings taken throughout the first decade of the 21st century and comparing it to the prior data on file.

Information pertaining to such activity has been collected and kept for the past 120 years.

Methods used in its gathering include physical examinations, satellite recordings, and calculations based on images and writings.

The team's analysis shows that between the years 2000 and 2010, the glaciers in question lost between approximately 1 and 3 feet of their thickness annually.

That's as much as triple the average depletion rate of the 20th century.

Given the glaciers' currently compromised state, it is believed that even climate stabilization won't be enough to reverse the melting trend.

It's more likely that many of the frozen masses will continue to shrink, regardless.

A separate assessment concerning the state of glaciers over the past 5 years was performed as well, though not included in the main study.

Results of that research show the heightened loss rate is, thus far, continuing.

RELATED: See photos of incredible ice caves inside Iceland's glaciers:
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Ice caves inside Iceland glacier
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Glacier loss occurring at unprecedented accelerated rate
Photo credit: Solent
Photo credit: Solent
Icebergs with Aurora and reflections, Jokulsarlon Glacial Lagoon, Breidamerkurjokull Glacier, Vatnajokull Ice Cap, Iceland (Photo credit: Getty)
Ice walls with cave, Breidamerkurjokull, Vatnajokull Ice Cap, Iceland (Photo credit: Getty)
Glacial Ice Cave, Svinafellsjokull glacier, Skaftafell National Park, Iceland (Photo credit: Getty)
Detail of glacial ice cave on Svinafellsjokull, Vatnajokull Ice Cap, Iceland (Photo credit: Getty)
Langjokull Glacier, Iceland. Caves are formed from either hot springs underneath glacier or meltwater from surface. Climber is 80 feet below surface of glacier (Photo credit: Getty)
fjallsjokull glacier ice cave, Iceland (Photo credit: Getty)
Ice cave in the Vatnajökull glacier (Photo credit: Getty)
Ice cave in Vatnajökull ice cap, southern Iceland. Vatnajökull is the largest ice cap in Europe (Photo credit: Getty)
Gruta de hielo en el glaciar Vatnajökull, en Islandia. (Photo credit: Getty)
Iceland, Svinafellsjokull, Exploring glacial ice cave (Photo credit: Getty)
Sv’nafellsjkull glacier ice cave, Iceland (Photo credit: Getty)
At the Edge of Glacier, Iceland. The crystal blue roof of the ice cave has stain with black color of volcanic ashes. (Photo credit: Getty)
A snow ridge and glacier ice cave along the Laugavegur Trek, Iceland (Photo credit: Getty)
Glaciar Vatnajökull (Photo credit: Getty)
Gruta de hielo en el glaciar Vatnajökull, en Islandia. (Photo credit: Getty)
Sv’nafellsjkull glacier ice cave, Iceland (Photo credit: Getty)
Climber abseiling into ice cave (Photo credit: Getty)
Man looking up in ice cave, Vatnajokull Glacier, Vatnajokull National Park, Iceland (Photo credit: Getty)
Inside a cave in an icelandic glacier. (Photo credit: Getty)
Photo credit: Solent
Photo credit: Solent
Photo credit: Solent
Photo credit: Solent
Photo credit: Solent
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