Art installation in Brooklyn records your confessions

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Art Installation In NYC Records Your Confessions

By PIX11

BROOKLYN — A new art exhibition in Brooklyn is getting people to open up – literally.

It's called "The Truth Booth" and it's encouraging participants to get deep and real about whatever is on their mind by asking you to complete the sentence "the truth is..."

The traveling art installation that launched in 2011 in Ireland has traveled to cities like Cape Town, South Africa and Cleveland, Ohio on a mission to engage and educate. It has since set up shop in Brooklyn at Metro Tech Commons.

"The common thread is that people are really generous, open and passionate," Hank Willis Thomas, one of the artists behind the project, told PIX11 News.

Thomas revealed he was taken aback by how honest participants were especially in war-torn countries like Afghanistan.

"I would never expect that total strangers would walk in and speak to a camera where they don't know where the images are gonna go," he said.

They indeed have and in large numbers, opening up about their truths inside the 16-foot tall by 23-foot wide video booth that's hard to miss.

"This body of work is fascinating to me because it celebrates and articulates the cultural diversity that is Brooklyn," David Berliner, Chief Operating Officer of Forest City Ratner Companies, told PIX11 News.

According to Berliner, bringing the Truth Booth to Brooklyn was a no-brainer.

"We want people to feel connected here and the way to do that is to activate this public space with contemporary art that is thought provoking," he said.

You have until 8 p.m. Tuesday to go visit the Truth Booth at Metro Tech commons.

After Tuesday, the booth will emerge again at Atlantic Terminal Plaza on September 26 and then back at Metro Tech on October 15th.

Related images of an art exhibition made out of trash found in the ocean:

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Brazil trash art
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Art installation in Brooklyn records your confessions
Sculptures of dolphins made with trash are exhibited at the Rio de Janeiro Federal University in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, June 1, 2015. Art students have taken advantage of a material they have in endless supply _ trash _ to create an exhibition that aims to draw attention to the fetid state of the city's Guanabara Bay, where the Olympic sailing events are to be held next year. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
A sofa litters Guanabara Bay along with other trash in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, June 1, 2015. Art students at a Rio de Janeiro university have taken advantage of a material they have in endless supply _ trash _ to create an exhibition that aims to draw attention to the fetid state of the city's Guanabara Bay, where the Olympic sailing events are to be held next year. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
A sculpture made of trash collected in Guanabara Bay stands on display at the Rio de Janeiro Federal University as part of an exhibit titled "The Sea Isn't Made for Fish" in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, June 1, 2015. Around 30 art students used plastic bottles, tires, old flip flops, plastic helmets, scratched CDs, old tubes and plastic supermarket bags to make sculptures of ocean fauna including an octopus and dolphins. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
A soccer ball decorated in the colors of Brazil's national flag lays strewn along the shore with other trash in Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, June 1, 2015. With poor trash and sewage services, Rio's waterways are choked with raw sewage and garbage, which university art students used to create an exhibition to draw attention to the fetid state of the city’s bay. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
A sculpture of a dolphin with a tire caught around its neck is exhibited at Rio de Janeiro Federal University as part of an exhibit titled “The Sea Isn’t Made for Fish,” in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, June 1, 2015. Art students have taken advantage of a material they have in endless supply _ trash _ to create an exhibition that aims to draw attention to the fetid state of the city’s Guanabara Bay, where the Olympic sailing events are to be held next year. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Vultures perch on trash strewn along the shore of Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, June 1, 2015. With poor trash and sewage services, Rio's waterways are choked with raw sewage and garbage, which university art students used to create an exhibition to draw attention to the fetid state of the city’s bay. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
A doll forms part of a sculpture as part of an exhibit titled “The Sea Isn’t Made for Fish” at Rio de Janeiro Federal University in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, June 1, 2015. Art students have taken advantage of a material they have in endless supply _ trash _ to create an exhibition that aims to draw attention to the fetid state of the city’s Guanabara Bay, where the Olympic sailing events are to be held next year. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Brazilian artist Fabio Drumond arranges a sculpture made of trash collected from the coastline, as part of the exhibit titled "The Sea Isn't Made for Fish" at the Rio de Janeiro Federal University in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, June 1, 2015. With poor trash and sewage services, Rio's waterways are choked with raw sewage and garbage. Organizers say the materials used in the sculptures were plucked off a nearby coast. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
The arm of a doll is part of a sculpture made from trash, on display at the Rio de Janeiro Federal University at an exhibit titled “The Sea Isn’t Made for Fish” in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, June 1, 2015. Art students have taken advantage of a material they have in endless supply _ trash _ to create an exhibition that aims to draw attention to the fetid state of the city’s Guanabara Bay, where the Olympic sailing events are to be held next year. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Dolls are part of a sculpture made of trash, exhibited at the Rio de Janeiro Federal University, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, June 1, 2015. Art students at a Brazilian university have taken advantage of the trash they have in endless supply to create an exhibition that aims to draw attention to the fetid state of Rio de Janeiro's Guanabara Bay, where Olympic sailing events are to be held next year. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Shoes that were found as trash are part of a sculpture exhibited at the Rio de Janeiro Federal University, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, June 1, 2015. Art students at a Brazilian university have taken advantage of the trash they have in endless supply to create an exhibition that aims to draw attention to the fetid state of Rio de Janeiro's Guanabara Bay, where Olympic sailing events are to be held next year. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Trash collected from the coastline is exhibited as part of a show titled "The Sea Isn't Made for Fish" at the Rio de Janeiro Federal University in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, June 1, 2015. Art students at a Rio de Janeiro university have taken advantage of a material they have in endless supply _ trash _ to create an exhibition that aims to draw attention to the fetid state of the cityís Guanabara Bay, where the Olympic sailing events are to be held next year. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Trash lays on the coast of Guanabara bay in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, June 1, 2015. Art students at a Rio de Janeiro university have taken advantage of a material they have in endless supply _ trash _ to create an exhibition that aims to draw attention to the fetid state of the city’s Guanabara Bay, where the Olympic sailing events are to be held next year. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
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