Today in history: 1999 - The first shuttle mission to be commanded by a woman, U.S. space shuttle Discovery completed a five-day mission

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Eileen Collins: NASA's First Woman Commander
Today was a special day in history, especially for women in space. The first shuttle mission to be commanded by a woman, U.S. space shuttle Discovery completed a five-day mission on July 27th, 1999.

Eileen Collins sat down with MAKERS and told her story about being raised by her mom, falling in love with aviation, and becoming the first woman to pilot a space shuttle.

Click through to see photos of Collins' career:
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Astronaut Eileen Collins
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Today in history: 1999 - The first shuttle mission to be commanded by a woman, U.S. space shuttle Discovery completed a five-day mission
Commander Eileen Collins (pictured) is the first woman to serve as a shuttle mission commander. She was the first woman pilot of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-63, and also served as pilot on mission STS-84. Collins will command the crew of STS-93 on a five-day mission aboard Space Shuttle Columbia on its newly scheduled launch date July 9. (photo by NASA)
Astronaut Eileen Collins, pilot, handles transmitted messages from ground controllers in Houstonas commander Charles Precourt looks on May 24, 1997 during shuttle Atlantis mission over earth.
Pilot Eileen Collins aboard the space shuttle Atlantis during rendezvous operations with Russia's Mir space station May 24, 1997 in earth orbit.
WASHINGTON, : US actor Tom Hanks (L) speaks to astronaut and Shuttle Commander Eileen Collins (R) during a space and science discussion 05 March with students at Dunbar Senior High School in Washington, DC. Collins was named first woman shuttle commander at a ceremony earlier 05 March at the White House. AFP PHOTO Jamal A. WILSON (Photo credit should read JAMAL A. WILSON/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 5: US President Bill Clinton (R) applauds beside US astronaut Eileen Collins (L) during a ceremony 05 March at the White House announcing Collins will be the world's very first female shuttle commander. Collins has served as pilot on two previous shuttle flights, the last in May 1997, when the shuttle Atlantis docked with the Russian space station Mir. (Photo credit should read WILLIAM PHILPOTT/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 5: US astronaut Eileen Collins waits to be introduced by US President Bill Clinton during a ceremony 05 March at the White House in Washington, DC. The president announced Collins, who has served as the pilot on two previous shuttle flights, will be the world's first female shuttle commander. (Photo credit should read WILLIAM PHILPOTT/AFP/Getty Images)
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, UNITED STATES: Space shuttle Columbia Pilot Jeffrey Ashby (L) and the first female shuttle commander Eileen Collins wave as they depart the Operations and Checkout building enroute to launch pad 39-B at the Kennedy Space Center 19 July, 1999. Columbia is scheduled to blast off early 20 July on a five day mission to deploy the Chandra X-ray Observatory. AFP PHOTO/Tony RANZE [ELECTRONIC IMAGE] (Photo credit should read TONY RANZE/AFP/Getty Images)
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, UNITED STATES: US space shuttle Columbia crew (From L-R:) Catherine Coleman of the US, Pilot Jeff Ashby of the US, Commander Eileen Collins of the US, Steve Hawley of th US and Michel Tognini of France appear 28 July 1999 after a successful landing on runway 33 at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, FL. The Columbia and her five crew members returned from a five-day science mission in space that included the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. AFP PHOTO Tony RANZE/bw (Photo credit should read TONY RANZE/AFP/Getty Images)
Space shuttle commander Eileen Collins holds her daughter Bridget, 3, as she is greeted by Vice President Al Gore on her return to Houston Wednesday, July 28, 1999. Collins, the first woman to ever command a shuttle crew, and her crew landed safely last night after spending five days in space and releasing the Chandra satellite. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)
WASHINGTON, : US Astronauts Buzz Aldrin (L), second man on the moon in 1969, and Eileen Collins, the first femael commander of a shuttle misson, speak to students at Stuart-Hobson Middle School to introduce a youth drug prevention area on the NASA website, promoting the slogan 'Explore Space, not drugs' 13 September, 1999, in Washington DC. The astronauts were joined by US Drug Czar Barry McCaffrey, NASA administrator Dan Goldin and Rep. Matt Salmon (R-AZ). (ELECTRONIC IMAGE) Tim Sloan / AFP photo (Photo credit should read TIM SLOAN/AFP/Getty Images)
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, UNITED STATES: US space shuttle Commander Eileen Collins gestures 02 May 2005 while walking to the Shuttle Training Aircraft at the Kennedy Space Center. Collins and the crew of STS-114 are at the Kennedy Space Center for a 'flight readiness review.' Seeking to avoid a repeat of the deadly 2003 Columbia disaster, NASA postponed until July the launch of the space shuttle Discovery over fears of a similar incident 30 April. AFP PHOTO/Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
CAPE CANAVERAL, FL - MAY 2: Space Shuttle Discovery Commander Eileen Collins taxis the Shuttle Training Aircraft, a modified Gulfstream jet, May 2, 2005 at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility runway at Cape Canaveral, Florida. Despite Discovery's launch date being pushed back to no sooner than July, the STS-114 astronauts arrived in Florida for the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test this week. (Photo by Matt Stroshane/Getty Images)
CAPE CANAVERAL, FL - MAY 3: Space Shuttle Discovery commander Eileen Collins addresses the media in front of the shuttle on launch pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center May 3, 2005 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. Despite Discovery's launch date being pushed back to no sooner than July, the STS-114 astronauts arrived in Florida for the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test this week. (Photo by Matt Stroshane/Getty Images) address the media in front of the shuttle on launch pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, May 3, 2005. Despite Discovery's launch date being pushed back to no sooner than July, the STS-114 astronauts arrived in Florida for the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test this week. (Photo by Matt Stroshane/Getty Images)
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, UNITED STATES: Space shuttle Discovery Commander Eileen Collins waves in front of Austalian born crew member Andrew Thomas 09 July 2005 after their arrival at the Kennedy Space Center. The seven member crew is set to launch 13 July 2005. AFP PHOTO/Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
In this image from NASA TV space shuttle Discovery Commander Eileen Collins is seen with international space station astronaut John Phillips, left, after the shuttle docked with the ISS Thursday, July 28, 2005. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
CAPE CANAVERAL, FL - JULY 13: Space Shuttle Discovery commander Eileen Collins walks from the crew area to the astronaut van to be driven to the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center July 13, 2005 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The Discovery astronauts are mission specialist Wendy Lawrence, mission specialist Andrew Thomas, mission specialist Charles Camarda, pilot James Kelly, mission specialist Stephen Robinson, mission specialist Soichi Noguchi, of the National Space Development Agency of Japan (JAXA) and commander Eileen Collins. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
IN SPACE - JULY 28: In this handout photo provided by NASA, Discovery's crew members Eileen M. Collins (C), STS-114 commander, flanked by astronauts Stephen K. Robinson (L) ,mission specialist, and James M. Kelly, pilot, are shown July 28, 2005. During flight day 2, the shuttle crew docked at the station and photographed the underbelly of the shuttle looking for signs of damage. (Photo by NASA via Getty Images)
Edwards Air Force Base, UNITED STATES: US space shuttle Discovery Commander Eileen M. Collins (L) and pilot James M. Kelly answer questions at a press conference at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center on Edwards Air Force Base, California, 09 August 2005, following the Discovery's landing earlier in the day. AFP PHOTO/ Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
Space Shuttle STS-114 crew, Commander Eileen Collins, right, and Pilot James Kelly wave to the crowd during a parade through downtown Chigasaki, the hometown of Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi, west of Tokyo, Sunday, Oct. 2, 2005. Noguchi and the other six astronauts spent 15 days in the space aboard space shuttle Discovery. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye)
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