Photo of deformed daisies found near Fukushima goes viral

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Photo Of Deformed Daisies Found Near Fukushima Goes Viral

It's been four years since the meltdown at the Fukushima nuclear power plant, and to this day, some areas near the site remain uninhabitable. The grounds surrounding the plant appear to still be experiencing repercussions as suggested by an image of deformed daisies posted to social media in May:



That photo, which has become quite popular on the Internet, was reportedly taken about 70 miles outside of the nuclear site. It shows a patch of the flowers resembling a Salvador Dali painting.

Some look joined at their centers, with petals jutting out at an obtuse, and decidedly unnatural, angle.

Take a look back on the Fukushima disaster:
40 PHOTOS
Looking back on the Fukushima disaster
See Gallery
Photo of deformed daisies found near Fukushima goes viral
FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2011 file photo, workers in protective suits and masks wait to enter the emergency operation center at the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in Okuma, Japan. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder, Pool, File)
Residents evacuated from areas surrounding the Fukushima nuclear facilities damaged in Friday's massive earthquake react as they are asked to be checked for radiation exposure, Sunday, March 13, 2011, Koriyama city, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
Residents queue to collect fresh water in Koriyama, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, Sunday, March 13, 2011, two days after a giant quake and tsunami struck the country's northeastern coast. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
ALTERNATE CROP - Residents evacuated from areas surrounding the Fukushima nuclear facilities damaged in Friday's massive earthquake react during a check for radiation contamination, Sunday, March 13, 2011, in Koriyama city, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
A man holds his baby as they are scanned for levels of radiation in Koriyama, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, Sunday, March 13, 2011. Friday's quake and tsunami damaged two nuclear reactors at a power plant in the prefecture, and at least one of them appeared to be going through a partial meltdown, raising fears of a radiation leak. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
Self-defense force's members and others carry a resident who is suspected to be exposed to radiation, in Nihonmatsu, Fukushima, northern Japan Sunday, March 13, 2011 following radiation emanation from a nuclear reactor after Friday's catastrophic earthquake and tsunami. (AP Photo/Yomiuri Shimbun, Daisuke Tomita) JAPAN OUT, CREDIT MANDATORY
A man holds his dog as they are scanned for levels of radiation in Koriyama, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, Sunday, March 13, 2011. Friday's quake and tsunami damaged two nuclear reactors at a power plant in the prefecture, and at least one of them appeared to be going through a partial meltdown, raising fears of a radiation leak. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
ARCHIV: In this image made from Japan's NTV/NNN Japan television, smoke ascends from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant's Unit 3 in Okumamachi, northern Japan, Monday, March 14, 2011. The second hydrogen explosion in three days rocked Japan's stricken nuclear plant Monday, sending a massive column of smoke into the air and wounding 11 workers. An einem gewoehnlichen Freitagnachmittag vor vier Monaten begann die Erde in Japan zu beben. Mit dem verheerenden Erdbeben und dem darauffolgenden Tsunami am 11. Maerz nahm die Tragoedie ihren Lauf, die sich fuer Japan zu einem atomaren Albtraum entwickelte. Die ersten 24 Stunden nach Beginn der Krise in dem durch die Naturkatastrophe verwuesteten Atomkraftwerk Fukushima-Daiichi waren entscheidend. (zu dapd-Text) (AP Photo/NTV/NNN Japan) MANDATORY CREDIT, JAPAN OUT, TV OUT, NO SALES, EDITORIAL USE ONLY Foto: Anonymous/AP/dapd
Tsunami survivor Atsushi Shishido, 30, sits where tsunami waters destroyed homes and killed neighbors though he rescued his 87-year-old grandmother in Friday's massive earthquake, Monday, March 14, 2011, in the coastal region of Soma city, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
Firefighters search for victims Monday, March 14, 2011, in Soma city, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, three days after a massive earthquake and tsunami struck the country's north east coast. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
Officials wearing clothing to protect against radiation work in a center to scan residents who have been within 20 kilometers of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant damaged by Friday's earthquake Tuesday, March 15, 2011, in Koriyama, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Evacuees rest in a shelter in Soma city, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, Monday, March 14, 2011, three days after a massive earthquake and tsunami struck the country's north east coast. On top of the losses of family and friends along with property, evacuees in the area are now faced with the fears of radiation contamination from damaged nuclear facilities near by. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
A woman uses her phone as she found a quiet place at a shelter for those evacuated away from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant Wednesday, March 16, 2011, in Koriyama, Japan. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Evacuees are screened for radiation contamination at a testing center Tuesday, March 15, 2011, in Koriyama city, Fukushima Prefecture, northern Japan, four days after a massive earthquake and tsunami struck the country's north east coast. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
A man is scanned for radiation at a temporary scanning center for residents living close to the quake-damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant Wednesday, March 16, 2011, in Koriyama, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Tokyo Electric Co. employees in charge of public relations use a photo of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex to explain the situation during a press conference Wednesday, March 16, 2011 in Tokyo, Japan. The outer housing of the containment vessel at the No. 4 unit at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex erupted in flames early Wednesday, said a spokesman for the plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
Japan's Defense Ministry officials plot possibly radioactive affected areas on a map at the emergency rescue headquarters monitoring leaked radiation from the Fukushima nuclear facilities damaged by last week's major earthquake and following tsunami, Wednesday, March 16, 2011, in Fukushima city, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
A woman is scanned for radiation exposure at a temporary scanning center for residents living close to the quake-damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant Wednesday, March 16, 2011, in Koriyama, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Passengers wait for their flights at a check-in area at Narita airport, near Tokyo, Thursday, March 17, 2011. The airport was crowded with evacuees and regular passengers Thursday following advisories from foreign governments recommending citizens leave the country, as the crisis at Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant in the northeast deepened. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
A woman holds her dog as they are scanned for radiation at a temporary scanning center for residents living close to the quake-damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant Wednesday, March 16, 2011, in Koriyama, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Drivers have a chat as hundreds of vehicles line the highway in hopes of filling their gas tanks as massive shortages continue following fears of leaked radiation from the damaged Fukushima nuclear facilities, Sunday, March 20, 2011 in Fukushima city, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. Emergency workers racing to cool dangerously overheated uranium fuel say they are making progress in lowering the temperatures. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
Rows of people line with jugs in hopes of filling for home heating fuel as massive shortages continue following fears of leaked radiation from the damaged Fukushima nuclear facilities, Sunday, March 20, 2011 in Fukushima city, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. Emergency workers racing to cool dangerously overheated uranium fuel say they are making progress in lowering the temperatures. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
People hold signs against nuclear power during an anti-war and anti-nuclear march Sunday, March 20, 2011, in Tokyo. Hundreds of protesters marched for peace and against nuclear power in Tokyo Sunday, as plant workers continue their race to avert disaster at the tsunami-damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in the north. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Filipino port workers practice their skills on a radiation isotope identification device which is used to detect radiation levels on shipments arriving from other countries at Manila's south harbor, Philippines, on Tuesday, March 22, 2011. The Bureau of Customs have raised heightened alerts on all ports to monitor meat and dairy products imported from Japan following the damage of the Nuclear complex in Fukushima. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
A man is screened at an evacuee center for leaked radiation from the damaged Fukushima nuclear facilities, Tuesday, March 22, 2011 in Fukushima, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Before the disasters, safety drills were seldom if ever practiced and information about radiation exposure rarely given in Futuba, said a woman living in the small town in the shadow of the nuclear plant in Fukushima Prefecture. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), Vice President Norio Tsuzumi, left, bows as he makes an apology to the mayor of Okuma, right, in Tanuma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, Tuesday, March 22, 2011. Okuma, the town situated within 10 kilometers (6.25 miles) to the crippled nuclear power plants, were forced to relocate its function and residents to outranged Tamura town. (AP Photo/Yomiuri Shimbun, Koichi Nakamura) JAPAN OUT, MANDATORY CREDIT
A comment board is seen at an evacuee center for leaked radiation from the damaged Fukushima nuclear facilities, Tuesday, March 22, 2011 in Fukushima, Fukushima Prefecture, northern Japan, following the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
South Korean environmentalists stage a protest aboard a boat calling for the closure of the outdated Gori reactor and opposing the construction of a new reactor on seas off Gori Nuclear Power Plant in Busan, South Korea, Wednesday, March 23, 2011. Fears over possible radiation contamination are growing in South Korea, the country closest to Japan, after Japanese nuclear power plants were damaged by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. The letters on the banner read " Gori, Next Fukushima." (AP Photo/Yonhap, Jo Jung-ho) KOREA OUT
Farmer Sumiko Matsuno picks carrots on her farm to eat as she explains her fears no one will buy them with the current radiation fallout, Thursday, March 24, 2011 in Fukushima, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. Shops across Tokyo began rationing goods - milk, toilet paper, rice and water - as a run on bottled water coupled with delivery disruptions left shelves bare Thursday nearly two weeks after a devastating earthquake and tsunami. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)
Imported seafood from Japan is screened for radiation by a chef at a Japanese restaurant in Hong Kong Tuesday, March 22, 2011, to make sure the food is safe to eat. China, Japan's largest trading partner, has ordered testing of imports of Japanese food. The World Health Organization has urged Japan to adopt stricter measures and reassure the public. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
South Korean environmentalists stage a rally demanding halt of expansion of nuclear power plants by the government in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, March 29, 2011. Fears over possible radiation contamination are growing in South Korea, the country closest to Japan, after the latter's nuclear power plants were damaged by the March 11 tsunami. The letters read "No nuclear power plants." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
A Japanese mourner cries for a loved one during a mass funeral in Higashimatsushima, northeastern Japan Saturday, March 26, 2011, following the March 11 earthquake, tsunami and the subsequent crisis at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama)
Part of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant overlooks a farmland in Futaba, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan, Sunday, April 17, 2011. The operator of the crippled nuclear power plant leaking radiation in northern Japan announced a plan Sunday to bring the crisis under control within six to nine months and allow some evacuated residents to return to their homes. (AP Photo/Hiro Komae)
In this Thursday May 26, 2011 photo, Japanese refugees from the town of Futaba, wearing suits to protect against radiation, wait to leave Tamura, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan to visit their homes. Residents of Futaba, around Japan's radiation-leaking Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex, were allowed a two hour visit home to collect belongings for the first time since the complex went into crisis in March. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)
FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2011 file photo, the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station is seen through a bus window in Okuma, Japan, as the media were allowed into Japan's tsunami-damaged nuclear power plant for the first time since the March 11 disaster. Japan is poised to declare its crippled nuclear plant virtually stable nine months after a devastating tsunami, but the facility still leaks some radiation, remains vulnerable to earthquakes and shows no prospect for cleanup for decades. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder, Pool, File)
Former Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan bows to the altar during the national memorial service for the victims of the March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami in Tokyo Sunday, March 11, 2012. Through silence and prayers, people across Japan on Sunday remembered the massive disaster that struck the nation one year ago, killing just over 19,000 people and unleashing the world's worst nuclear crisis in a quarter century. (AP Photo/Japan POOL) JAPAN OUT
With the back drop of the 330 ton fishing vessel Kyotoku Maru No. 18 which was flung 800 meters (0.5 mile) inland from Kesennuma port by the March 11, 2011, tsunami, the Kikuta family observe a moment of silence at a site where their house once stood at 2:46 PM, the time the earthquake hit one year ago, in Kesennuma, Iwate prefecture, northeastern Japan, Sunday, March 11 2012. Through silence and prayers Sunday, people across Japan remembered the disaster, killing just over 19,000 people and unleashing the world's worst nuclear crisis in a quarter century. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
A woman cries during a ceremony for victims of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, at Jyodoji temple in Rikuzentakata, Iwate prefecture, northeastern Japan, Sunday, March 11, 2012. With moments of silence and prayers, Japan on Sunday was remembering the massive earthquake and tsunami that struck the nation one year ago, killing just over 19,000 people and unleashing the world's worst nuclear crisis in a quarter century. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye)
People stand near a pine tree which survived the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, in Rikuzentakata, Iwate Prefecture, northeastern Japan, Sunday,March 11, 2012. On Sunday, Japan marks the one-year anniversary of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami that triggered a nuclear crisis. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


According to experts, such deformities occur when flowers experience hormonal imbalances, which rumor-busting site Snopes.com says could be caused by a variety of factors. The site notes "daisies showcasing similar mutations have been found at locations far away from nuclear radiation."

They are the latest among many publicized mutations occurring near the Fukushima plant, with previous reports and images showing deformed produce and altered animals. Despite such occurrences, airborne radiation levels in the town of Naraha, which is about 2 miles from the nuclear plant, have been deemed low enough for its evacuated residents to return.

Related Video: What's ahead for Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant
What's Ahead for Japan's Fukushima Nuclear Plant
Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners