GOP senator rages on John Kerry: He 'acted like Pontius Pilate'

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US Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Arkansas) said Secretary of State John Kerry acted like "Pontius Pilate" — the judge who is said to have presided over the trial of Jesus Christ — in negotiations with Iran over its nuclear program.

Cotton and other GOP lawmakers have been railing against the Obama administration for what they call secret "side agreements" between Iran and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). They involve revelations over Iran's past nuclearization efforts and on inspections at the Parchin military base, long a point of contention in the nuclear talks.

The contents of those alleged "side deals" are not public, though White House National Security Adviser Susan Rice told reporters on Wednesday that the administration would share the details with members of Congress during a classified briefing.

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GOP senator rages on John Kerry: He 'acted like Pontius Pilate'
President Barack Obama, standing with Vice President Joe Biden, delivers remarks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, July 14, 2015, after an Iran nuclear deal is reached. After 18 days of intense and often fractious negotiation, diplomats Tuesday declared that world powers and Iran had struck a landmark deal to curb Iran's nuclear program in exchange for billions of dollars in relief from international sanctions. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool)
US Secretary of State John Kerry organizes his papers during a hearing of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Capitol Hill July 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. US Secretary of State John Kerry, US Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and US Secretary of the Treasury Jacob Lew appeared before the committee to defend the Obama administrations proposed deal with Iran over the county's nuclear program. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
From left to right, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, German Foreign Minister Frank Walter Steinmeier, European Union High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Federica Mogherini, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, Head of the Iranian Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz pose for a group picture at the United Nations building in Vienna, Austria TuesdayJuly 14, 2015. (Carlos Barria, Pool Photo via AP)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry leaves the stage after a group picture with foreign ministers and representatives from China, Iran, Britain, Germany, France, and the European Union at the Vienna International Center in Vienna, Austria, Tuesday, July 14, 2015. After 18 days of intense and often fractious negotiation, world powers and Iran struck a landmark deal Tuesday to curb Iran's nuclear program in exchange for billions of dollars in relief from international sanctions — an agreement designed to avert the threat of a nuclear-armed Iran and another U.S. military intervention in the Muslim world. (Carlos Barria, Pool Photo via AP)
Iran's President Hassan Rouhani addresses the nation in a televised speech after a nuclear agreement was announced in Vienna, in Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, July 14, 2015. Rouhani said "a new chapter" has begun in his nation's relations with the world. He maintained that Iran had never sought to build a bomb, an assertion the U.S. and its partners have long disputed. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)
US Secretary of State John Kerry (L) sits next to British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond as they attend a plenary session at the United Nations building in Vienna, Austria July 14, 2015. Iran and six major world powers reached a nuclear deal on Tuesday, capping more than a decade of on-off negotiations with an agreement that could potentially transform the Middle East, and which Israel called an 'historic surrender'. AFP PHOTO / POOL / CARLOS BARRIA (Photo credit should read CARLOS BARRIA/AFP/Getty Images)
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu delivers a statement in his office in Jerusalem on July 14, 2015, after world powers reached a historic nuclear deal with Iran. Netanyahu said after the deal was reached that Israel was not bound by it and signalled he remained ready to order military action . AFP PHOTO / THOMAS COEX (Photo credit should read THOMAS COEX/AFP/Getty Images)
(From L to R) Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier, European Union High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Federica Mogherini, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, Head of the Iranian Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, US Secretary of State John Kerry and US Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz pose for a group picture at the United Nations building in Vienna, Austria July 14, 2015. Iran and six major world powers reached a nuclear deal, capping more than a decade of on-off negotiations with an agreement that could potentially transform the Middle East, and which Israel called an 'historic surrender'. AFP PHOTO / POOL / JOE KLAMAR (Photo credit should read JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry leaves his hotel on the way to mass at the St. Stephen's Cathedral in Vienna, Austria, Sunday July 12, 2015. Nuclear negotiations with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, appeared back on track Sunday, with Kerry dropping warnings they could go either way but expressing hope that nearly a decade of international efforts could soon result in a historic deal. (Carlos Barria / Pool via AP)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, centre, and State Department Chief of Staff Jon Finer, left, meet with other members of the U.S. delegation at the garden of the Palais Coburg hotel where the Iran nuclear talks meetings are being held in Vienna, Austria, Friday July 10, 2015. Kerry urged Iran to make the “tough political decisions” needed to reach an agreement but Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif accused major powers on Friday of backtracking on previous pledges and throwing up new "red lines" at nuclear talks. (Carlos Barria/Pool via AP)
German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier, left, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, 2nd left, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, 3rd left, European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini, centre in red, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, 4th right, and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, right, meet at a hotel in Vienna Monday July 13, 2015. Negotiators at the Iran nuclear talks plan to announce Monday that they've reached a historic deal capping nearly a decade of diplomacy that would curb the country's atomic program in return for sanctions relief, two diplomats told The Associated Press on Sunday. Other attendees at meeting not Identified. (Carlos Barria/Pool Photo, via AP)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry walks in the garden of Coburg where closed-door nuclear talks with Iran take place in Vienna, Austria, Sunday July 12, 2015. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)
Iranian Foreign Minister Mohamad Javad Zarif jokes with journalist from a balcony of the Palais Coburg where closed-door nuclear talks take place in Vienna, Austria, Friday, July 10, 2015. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)
Map locates Iran nuclear sites, via AP
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addresses the media in front of Palais Coburg where closed-door nuclear talks with Iran are taking place in Vienna, Austria, Thursday, July 9, 2015. Kerry signaled Thursday that diplomats won't conclude an Iran nuclear agreement by early Friday morning, conceding another delay that this time could complicate American efforts to quickly implement any deal. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)
Charts show the number of uranium enrichment centrifuges operating and Uranium stockpile over time. A diagram shows Iran's nuclear power fuel cycle, via AP
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry meets with foreign ministers of Germany, France, China, Britain, Russia and the European Union at a hotel in Vienna, Austria, Tuesday, July 7, 2015. Iran nuclear talks were in danger of busting through their second deadline in a week Tuesday, raising questions about the ability of world powers to cut off all Iranian pathways to a bomb through diplomacy, and testing the resolve of U.S. negotiators to walk away from the negotiation as they've threatened. (Carlos Barria/Pool photo via AP)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, 3rd left, meets with Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif, 2nd right, at an hotel in Vienna, Wednesday July 1, 2015. The head of the U.N. agency tasked to monitor a nuclear deal is traveling to Tehran to meet with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, the agency said Wednesday. (Carlos Barria/Pool Photo via AP)
Dark clouds hang over Palais Coburg where closed-door nuclear talks with Iran take place in Vienna, Austria, Thursday, July 9, 2015. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)
U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Head of the Iranian Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, left, meet at an hotel in Vienna, Thursday, July 9, 2015. Negotiations over Iran's nuclear program lurched toward another deadline on Thursday with diplomats reconvening amid persistent uncertainty and vague but seemingly hopeful pronouncements from participants. (Carlos Barria/Pool Photo via AP)
German Foreign Minister Frank Walter Steinmeier, left, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, 2nd left, European Union High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Federica Mogherini, 5th right,, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, 3rd right and British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, right, meet along with representatives from China and Russia at an hotel in Vienna, Thursday, July 9, 2015. Negotiations over Iran's nuclear program lurched toward another deadline on Thursday with diplomats reconvening amid persistent uncertainty and vague but seemingly hopeful pronouncements from participants. (Carlos Barria/Pool Photo via AP)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, 3rd left, British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, 2nd right, and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, right, meet with foreign ministers from China, Germany and France at an hotel in Vienna, Austria Monday, July 6, 2015. Iran's foreign minister said on Monday some differences still remained between Iran and six powers over the country's disputed nuclear programme ahead of Tuesday's deadline for a final agreement to end a 12-year-old dispute. (Carlos Barria/Pool Photo via AP)
In this Saturday, July 4, 2015 photo, Tehran's ambassador to Kabul, Mohammad Reza Bahrami, speaks during an interview with The Associated Press at the Iranian embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan. As Iran and global powers move toward a nuclear agreement, Brahimi said a deal easing crippling economic sanctions would also benefit security and development in Afghanistan, his country’s war-torn neighbor. Bahrami also said Iran would be prepared to help fight the Islamic State group if its presence in Afghanistan grows into a real and regional threat. (AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini)
German Minister for Foreign Affairs Frank-Walter Steinmeier (L) ,French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius (3rd L), China's Foreign Minister Wang Yi (5th L), Federica Mogherini (C), High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, US Secretary of State John Kerry (3rd R), British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (2nd R) and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov (R) sit around the table at the Palais Coburg Hotel where the Iran nuclear talks meetings are being held in Vienna, Austria on July 6, 2015. Foreign ministers from major powers began crunch talks in Vienna on Monday seeking to seal a historic nuclear deal to end a 13-year standoff, one day before a final deadline, officials said. AFP PHOTO / JOE KLAMAR (Photo credit should read JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, talks with British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, right, as they meet with foreign ministers from China, Germany and France at an hotel in Vienna, Austria Monday, July 6, 2015. Iran's foreign minister said on Monday some differences still remained between Iran and six powers over the country's disputed nuclear programme ahead of Tuesday's deadline for a final agreement to end a 12-year-old dispute. (Carlos Barria/Pool Photo via AP)
German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier (L), French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius (3rd L) and Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi (R) sit around the table at the Palais Coburg Hotel where the Iran nuclear talks meetings are being held in Vienna, Austria on July 6, 2015. Foreign ministers from major powers began crunch talks in Vienna on Monday seeking to seal a historic nuclear deal to end a 13-year standoff, one day before a final deadline, officials said. AFP PHOTO / POOL / CARLOS BARRIA (Photo credit should read CARLOS BARRIA/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry delivers a statement on the Iran talks in Vienna, Austria, Sunday, July 5, 2015. Secretary of State John Kerry says negotiations with Iran could go either way — cutting off any potential path for an Iranian nuclear bomb or ending without agreement. Speaking in Vienna on the ninth day of the nuclear talks, Kerry says disagreements remain on several significant issues. He says hard choices must be made for a deal to be made by Tuesday, the latest deadline. (Leonhard Foeger/Pool photo via AP)
US Secretary of State John Kerry walks delivers a statement on Cuba outside the hotel where the Iran nuclear talks meetings are being held in Vienna, Austria, July 1, 2015. Talks between Iran and major powers towards a historic nuclear deal are facing tough issues but are making progress, US Secretary of State John Kerry said during a break from talks in Vienna. AFP PHOTO / CHRISTIAN BRUNA (Photo credit should read CHRISTIAN BRUNA/AFP/Getty Images)
Secretary of Iran's Supreme National Security Council Ali Shamkhani, right, welcomes Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Yukiya Amano, at the start of their meeting in Tehran, Iran, Thursday, July 2, 2015. Iran has met a key commitment under a preliminary nuclear deal setting up the current talks on a final agreement, leaving it with several tons less of the material it could use to make weapons, according to a U.N. report issued Wednesday. Second left is an unidentified interpreter. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, meets with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov at a hotel in Vienna Tuesday June 30, 2015. Talks continued in Vienna Tuesday on Iran's nuclear programme. (Carlos Barria/Pool, via AP)
A petition scroll with signatures and comments is displayed during a demonstration of a group of hard-liners demanding Iranian nuclear negotiators to sign a “good deal” with 5+1 countries that reserves rights of the Iranian nation, in Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Some 200 hard-liners gathered in a central square of Tehran providing a long petition in which they demanded all sanctions against Iran should be simultaneously lifted in the same time of signing the final nuclear deal and rejected any inspection on Iran’s military sites saying the country should be able to continue its nuclear research and developments with no barrier. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)
Petition scrolls hang from the Azadi (Freedom) tower during a demonstration of a group of hard-liners demanding Iranian nuclear negotiators to sign a “good deal” with 5+1 countries that reserves rights of the Iranian nation, in Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Some 200 hard-liners gathered in a central square of Tehran providing a long petition in which they demanded all sanctions against Iran should be simultaneously lifted in the same time of signing the final nuclear deal and rejected any inspection on Iran’s military sites saying the country should be able to continue its nuclear research and developments with no barrier. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)
Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, Yukiya Amano of Japan arrives at the Palais Coburg where closed-door nuclear talks with Iran take place in Vienna, Austria, Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Talks continued Tuesday on Iran's nuclear program. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)
A member of the Chinese delegation talks on the phone at a hotel where the Iran nuclear talks meetings are being held in Vienna, Austria, Sunday, June 28, 2015. (Carlos Barria/Pool via AP)
British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, left, , U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (2nd L ) and China's deputy foreign minister Li Baodong (3rd L), Russia's Deputy foreign minister Sergei Ryabkov (5th R), French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius (4th R) European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini (3rd R) and Germany's foreign minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier (2nd R) meet at a hotel in Vienna, Austria, Sunday, June 28, 2015. (Carlos Barria/Pool via AP)
US President Barack Obama gestures while making a statement at the White House in Washington, DC, on April 2, 2015 after a deal was reached on Iran's nuclear program. Iran and world powers agreed on the framework of a potentially historic deal aimed at curbing Tehran's nuclear drive after marathon talks in Switzerland. AFP PHOTO/ NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - APRIL 14: Sen. Bob Corker, Senate Foreign Relations chairman, arrives for a briefing on Iran nuclear negotiations with Secretary of State John Kerry and President Obama's chief of staff Jack Lew in the Capitol on Tuesday, April 14, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
French Foreign Affairs Minister Laurent Fabius (R) listens on as US Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a joint press conference on March 7, 2015 at the Foreign Affairs Minister in Paris. Kerry had flown into Paris just a couple of hours earlier in a bid to shore up European support for the proposed deal with Iran ahead of a March 31 deadline. AFP PHOTO /ERIC FEFERBERG (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
EU political director Helga Schmid (CL) seats next to Iran's deputy foreign minister Abbas Araqchi (R) at the opening of nuclear talks between Iran and Members of the P5+1 group on March 5, 2015 in Montreux. The so-called P5+1 group of Britain, China, France, Russia, the United States and Germany is trying to strike an accord that would prevent Tehran from developing a nuclear bomb. AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINI (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 03: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (3rd L) talks to U.S. Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and Senate Majority Whip Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) (L) as Senate Minority Leader Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV) (R) looks on during a photo-op prior to a meeting at the U.S. Capitol March 3, 2015 in Washington, DC. At the risk of further straining the relationship between Israel and the Obama Administration, Netanyahu addressed a joint meeting of the U.S. Congress warning congressional members against what he considers an ill-advised nuclear deal with Iran. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
US Secretary of State John Kerry (R) is greeted by French Foreign Minister Fabius Laurent, on March 7, 2015, at the French Foreign Ministry in Paris. Flying in from London on the last stop of a week-long trip, Kerry will meet with the foreign ministers of France, Germany, and Britain to brief them on the status of the nuclear negotiations with Iran. AFP PHOTO/ERIC FEFERBERG (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks at a news conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, Saturday, March 14, 2015. Kerry said he's returning to nuclear negotiations with Iran with "important gaps" standing in the way of a deal. He spoke Saturday in the Egyptian resort, where he attended an economic conference. (AP Photo/Brian Snyder, Pool)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, second left, arrives for a meeting with Bahrain's king in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, Saturday, March 14, 2015. At a news conference, Kerry delivered a highly cautious assessment ahead of the next round of nuclear talks with Iran, citing "important gaps" in the way of a deal before an end of March deadline. He spoke Saturday in the Egyptian resort, where he attended an economic conference. (AP Photo/Brian Snyder, Pool)
In this picture released by the official website of the office of the Iranian supreme leader, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei speaks in a meeting with members of the Iran's Assembly of Experts, in Tehran, Iran, Thursday, March 12, 2015. Iran's supreme leader said Thursday that a letter from Republican lawmakers warning that any nuclear deal could be scrapped by the next U.S. president is a sign of "disintegration" in Washington. (AP Photo/Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader)
Head of Iranian Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, right, looks at papers prior to meetings at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel, in Lausanne, Switzerland, Saturday March 28, 2015. Negotiations over Iran's nuclear program picked up pace on Saturday with the foreign ministers of France and Germany joining U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in talks with Iran's top diplomat ahead of a looming end-of-March deadline for a preliminary deal. (AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)
LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND - MARCH 28: German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier arrives at Beau-Rivage Palace in Lausanne, Switzerland where he came for the nuclear talks with Iran on March 28, 2015. (Photo by Fatih Erel/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND - MARCH 28: German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier arrives at Beau-Rivage Palace in Lausanne, Switzerland where he came for the nuclear talks with Iran on March 28, 2015. (Photo by Fatih Erel/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
US Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman (L) and US Secretary of State John Kerry (2nd L) face French Director-General for Political and Security Affairs at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Nicolas de Riviere (2nd R), and French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius (R) at the opening of a bilateral meetinh at Iran nuclear talks on March 28, 2015 in Lausanne. AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINI (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)
The director-general for political and security affairs at the French Foreign Ministry, Nicolas de Riviere (2nd R), and French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius (R) wait look on March 28, 2015 before a meeting at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel March 28, 2015 in Lausanne. US Secretary of State John Kerry and Fabius met while in Switzerland for negotiations with Iran on its nuclear program.. AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINI (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)
Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif (C) takes a walk before meetings at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel March 28, 2015 in Lausanne. Iranian officials are in Switzerland to continue negotiations on their nuclear program with other world powers. AFP PHOTO / POOL / BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2015 file photo, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., left, talks with the committee's tanking member Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J. on Capitol Hill in Washington. A bill calling for Congress to have a say about an emerging nuclear agreement with Iran has turned into a tug of war on Capitol Hill with Republicans trying to raise the bar so high that a final deal might be impossible and Democrats aiming to give the White House more room to negotiate with Tehran. Democratic and GOP senators are considering more than 50 amendments to a controversial bill introduced by Corker and Menendez. The bill would restrict Obama’s ability to ease sanctions against Iran without congressional approval.(AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and U.S. Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman, center, meet with foreign ministers and representatives of Germany, France, China, Britain, Russia and the European Union during the current round of nuclear talks with Iran, being held in Vienna, Austria July 10, 2015. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry urged Iran to make the "tough political decisions" needed to reach an agreement but Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif accused major powers on of backtracking on previous pledges and throwing up new "red lines" at nuclear talks. (Carlos Barria/Pool via AP)
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But Cotton, during a recent trip to Vienna, said he met with IAEA leaders, who told him that "two side deals" reached on Iran's nuclear program "remain secret and will not be shared with other nations, with Congress, or with the public."

"Iran's had almost four years to reveal the past military work that they've done their nuclear program," Cotton said during an interview on MSNBC's "Morning Joe" on Thursday. "This may have been a firm line that Iran would not draw, and the United States negotiating team simply was refusing to draw their own line or to walk away from the deal."

"So John Kerry acted like Pontius Pilate," Cotton added. "He washed his hands, kicked it to the IAEA, knowing that Congress would not get this information unless someone went out to find it."

The Parchin complex is crucial to determining the extent of Iran's nuclear program; it has been closed off to IAEA inspectors for a decade because it is considered a military facility. Upon reaching the separate deal with Iran, the IAEA said only that, "Iran and the IAEA agreed on another separate arrangement regarding the issue of Parchin."

Kerry is set to appear before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Thursday, along with Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz and Treasury Secretary Jack Lew. That committee features GOP presidential candidates and Sens. Marco Rubio (R-Florida) and Rand Paul (R-Kentucky). Congress is in the process of reviewing the Iran deal and will have 60 days to vote on its approval.

Cotton, along with House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio), Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky), and Rep. Mike Pompeo (R-Kansas) sent a letter to President Barack Obama on Wednesday urging him to publicly disclose the details of the IAEA's "side agreements."

"Failure to produce these two side agreements leaves Congress blind on critical information regarding Iran's potential path to being a nuclear power," they wrote.

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