North Korea says not interested in Iran-like nuclear talks with US

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North Korea is not interested in an Iran-like dialogue with the United States to give up its nuclear capabilities, the isolated country's foreign ministry said in a statement on Tuesday.

The statement said North Korea's nuclear program was an "essential deterrence" against U.S. foreign policy toward the reclusive country, which the North views as hostile.

"It is not logical to compare our situation with the Iranian nuclear agreement because we are always subjected to provocative U.S. military hostilities, including massive joint military exercises and a grave nuclear threat," said the statement, which was carried by state media but attributed to a foreign ministry spokesman.

"We do not have any interest at all on dialogue for unilaterally freezing or giving up our nukes," it said.

See photos from North Korea's rally against the UN:

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North Korea says not interested in Iran-like nuclear talks with US
In this July 27, 2013 file photo, North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un waves to spectators and participants of a mass military parade celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice in Pyongyang, North Korea. If the U.S. government's claim that North Korea was involved in the unprecedented hack attack on Sony Pictures that scuttled Seth Rogen's latest comedy is correct, no one can say they weren'€™t warned. The movie, €œThe Interview,€ pushed all of North Korea's buttons. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)
Security Council members vote for tough new sanctions against North Korea for its latest nuclear test, during a meeting at U.N. headquarters Thursday, March 7, 2013. The unanimous vote by the U.N.'s most powerful body sparked a furious Pyongyang to threaten a nuclear strike against the United States. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
Soldiers and citizens rally at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, to protest a United Nations resolution condemning their country's human rights record Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014. Protesters at the rally Tuesday on the square carried banners praising their leaders and condemning the United States. The banner in the center reads: "Let’s defend with our lives the Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Korea headed by supreme leader Kim Jong Un." (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
North Korean army officers and soldiers attend a rally at Kim Il Sung Square on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013, in Pyongyang, North Korea, in celebration of the country's recent nuclear test. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's decision to conduct a third underground nuclear test earlier in the week in defiance of resolutions banning nuclear and missile activity. The writing reads "We warmly congratulate the 3rd successful underground nuclear test." (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
North Korean soldiers stand near portraits of former North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il while attending a rally at Kim Il Sung Square on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013, in Pyongyang, North Korea, in celebration of the country's recent nuclear test. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's decision to conduct a third underground nuclear test earlier in the week in defiance of resolutions banning nuclear and missile activity. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
North Korean army officers and soldiers attend a rally at Kim Il Sung Square on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013, in Pyongyang, North Korea, in celebration of the country's recent nuclear test. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's decision to conduct a third underground nuclear test earlier in the week in defiance of resolutions banning nuclear and missile activity. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
A conductor guides a band as they practice a song before the start of a rally at Kim Il Sung Square on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2013, in Pyongyang, North Korea, in celebration of the country's recent nuclear test. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's decision to conduct a third underground nuclear test earlier in the week in defiance of resolutions banning nuclear and missile activity. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
Large screen monitors broadcast the recorded votes on a draft proposal during a meeting of the U.N. General Assembly human rights committee, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014. The committee approved a resolution that urges the Security Council to refer North Korea's harsh human rights situation to the International Criminal Court. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
Large screen monitors broadcast Choe Myong Nam, North Korea's official in charge of U.N. affairs and human rights, as he speaks during a meeting of the U.N. General Assembly human rights committee, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014. The committee approved a resolution that urges the Security Council to refer the country's harsh human rights situation to the International Criminal Court. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2012 file photo released by Korean Central News Agency, North Korea's Unha-3 rocket lifts off from the Sohae launch pad in Tongchang-ri, North Korea. The U.N. Security Council on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013 unanimously approved a resolution condemning North Korea's rocket launch in December and imposing new sanctions on Pyongyang's space agency. (AP Photo/KCNA, File)
North Koreans gather at the Kim Il Sung Square, some bowing towards portraits of their late leader Kim Jong Il, as an act of respect, to mark the third anniversary of his death, Wednesday Dec. 17, 2014 in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea marked the end of a three-year mourning period for the late leader Kim Jong Il on Wednesday, opening the way for his son, Kim Jong Un, to put a more personal stamp on the way the country is run. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
North Koreans gather in front of a portrait of their late leader Kim Il Sung, left, and Kim Jong Il, right, paying respects to their late leader Kim Jong Il, to mark the third anniversary of his death, Wednesday Dec. 17, 2014 at Pyong Chon District in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea marked the end of a three-year mourning period for the late leader Kim Jong Il on Wednesday, opening the way for his son, Kim Jong Un, to put a more personal stamp on the way the country is run. (AP Photo/Kim Kwang Hyon)
Choe Myong Nam, second from left, North Korea's official in charge of U.N. affairs and human rights, and other delegates watch the recorded votes on a draft proposal during a meeting of the U.N. General Assembly human rights committee, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014. The committee approved a resolution that urges the Security Council to refer North Korea's harsh human rights situation to the International Criminal Court. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
Choe Myong Nam, North Korea's official in charge of U.N. affairs and human rights, leaves after a draft resolution vote in the U.N. General Assembly human rights committee, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014. The committee approved a resolution that urges the Security Council to refer North Korea's harsh human rights situation to the International Criminal Court. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
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The United States and five world powers struck an historic deal with Iran last week that will limit Iran's nuclear capabilities in exchange for sanctions relief.

The Iran agreement was a great political victory for U.S. President Barack Obama, who has long promised to reach out to historic enemies, including North Korea.

The deal, in return for lifting U.S., EU and UN sanctions that have crippled its economy, stipulates that Iran must accept long-term limits on its nuclear program.

North Korea is also heavily sanctioned by the United States, European Union and the United Nations for procuring equipment related to its ongoing nuclear and ballistic missile programs.

"We are clearly a nuclear power and nuclear powers have their own interests," the North Korean statement said.

(Reporting by James Pearson and Seung Yun Oh; Editing by Paul Tait)

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