A startup founder reportedly jumped to her death from the top of New York City rooftop bar 230 Fifth

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A startup founder and iOS developer jumped to her death from a rooftop bar on Monday night, police and onlookers told the New York Post.

Faigy Mayer, who was 30 years old, was the founder and CEO of Appton, a New York-based app-development startup.

Mayer had developed a number of iOS apps, including NYCTips, a New York restaurant tip calculator, a parking app called Carma, and an app called ExpenseTracker, according to her LinkedIn page.

Mayer graduated with a bachelor's degree in accounting from Touro College, received a master's in accounting from Brooklyn College, and recently earned a certificate in data science specialization from Johns Hopkins University.

On Monday, Mayer was said to have sprinted toward a shrubbery-lined ledge of the terrace at 230 Fifth's rooftop bar, climbed up, and jumped to her death around 6:45 pm, the Post reports. It's unclear whether Mayer had come to the roof to jump or if she had been a guest at the bar earlier in the evening.

See how the public is reacting to Mayer's death:

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Faigy Mayer, startup founder who jumped to her death
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A startup founder reportedly jumped to her death from the top of New York City rooftop bar 230 Fifth
Orthodox funeral held for Faigy Mayer, former Hasid who jumped to death from NYC rooftop bar http://t.co/XHA4DXHfCl http://t.co/K2DMPGoVh3
Woman jumps to her death from rooftop bar over torment of leaving Jewish faith http://t.co/sciib3mgKp http://t.co/8uoEmEmKht
@ funeral for Faigy Mayer, who jumped to death @230FifthRooftopBar in Manhattan in Borough Park. @NYDailyNews http://t.co/BlCfIeFHD3
I've known a few who have jumped to their deaths. Those left here never get over it. Faigy Mayer bless you, so sorry you didn't want to stay
very sad such a young girl @FaigyMayer should lose her life. @ funeral in Borough Park. Man cries @NYDailyNews http://t.co/iTr1cBkDIm
1. My friends and our community has lost a beautiful light, as iOS developer Faigy Mayer chose to say goodbye to this mysterious world.
in honor of #FaigyMayer http://t.co/vd1vNU6Nuq may all who mourn find peace and strength to get through the hard days ahead.
got called a bit late for this, but made it for @FaigyMayer funeral at Shomrei Haddas. @NYDailyNews http://t.co/B88ybS0kyM
.@DailyMail Faigy Mayer, your light was needed longer on this earth. Not convinced you would leave this way. http://t.co/BST776fd9L
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Authorities identified Mayer by a purse and backpack she left behind at the rooftop bar, according to the Post. Police told the Post that Mayer died a the scene.

"There was a big corporate party up there and she kind of ran through them [the partygoers] and jumped," one witness told the Post.

Police sources say the death was likely deliberate, a suicide. If Mayer did commit suicide, she would unfortunately not be the first startup founder to do so. Founder suicides are sometimes outliers of the tech industry's quiet battle with depression, exacerbated by the stress of starting a company and trying to change the world. A study by Dr. Michael Freeman, a clinical professor at UCSF and an entrepreneur, was one of the first to link higher rates of mental health issues to entrepreneurship.

Of the 242 entrepreneurs he surveyed, 49% reported having a mental-health condition. Depression was the No. 1 reported condition among them and was present in 30% of all entrepreneurs, followed by ADHD (29%) and anxiety problems (27%).

That's a much higher percentage than the US population at large, where only about 7% identify as depressed. It's not clear whether or not Mayer suffered from depression.

Business Insider has reached out to the NYPD about the incident and will update this story accordingly.

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