On this day in history: The 1985 MLB All-Star Game was the first program broadcast in stereo by a TV network

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Baseball All Star Game 1985

As it stands now, the MLB All-Star Game is headed down an unpredictable path. Mostly out from underneath the baggage of the so-called Steroid Era, the league has struggled to market its brightest stars as successfully as the NBA or NFL has. This has never been more evident than this week, when this season's Midsummer Classic drew record-low television ratings.

But once upon a time -- three decades ago -- the game was used as a showcase, and not just with the players on the field.

On this day in 1985, the game -- broadcast on NBC -- was the first-ever television program to be transmitted in stereo. The pairing was a fitting one for such a milestone; NBC and the MLB had been partners since 1939, when the first-ever professional baseball game was aired on the network.

It was an important day not just for baseball, but for television. The home entertainment industry now relies on pristine audio just as much as high-definition video, with surround-sound systems now prominent in so many homes.

This anniversary should serve as something of a wake-up call to baseball. Once the nation's most captivating and widely followed pro sport, the MLB has struggled to resonate with younger generations after the late 1990s and early 2000s soured so many opinions of the game. Under new commissioner Rob Manfred, baseball has a lot to consider in the coming years.

For more on where the league's current All-Star format comes up short, see the video below.

Commentary: MLB's All-Star Game Problem


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