Farmers are using London's abandoned underground tunnels to grow vegetables

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Farmers Are Using London's Abandoned Underground Tunnels to Grow Vegetables


This brings a whole new meaning to farm to table eating. Growing Underground, a UK-based start-up, has begun farming below the streets of London in the city's abandoned underground tunnels. Originally constructed as bomb shelters during WWII, the tunnels lie 12 stories below ground level and have been unused since the 1940s.

Growing Underground has transformed the tunnels into cleanrooms, complete with solar and wind powered LED lights, bringing artificial sunlight below the streets. So far, the sustainable farming company produces microgreens, lettuce, and other vegetables year round without the threat of seasonal changes or drought. Even more impressive, their produce can be delivered fresh to customers within just eight hours!

See photos of other alternative farming trends here:

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Farmers are using London's abandoned underground tunnels to grow vegetables
**TO GO WITH AFP FEATURE STORY BY OLIVIER MORIN, WITH ANGUS MACKINNON IN ROME. Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi, checks an immersed biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. Three biospheres filled with unpolluted air helps plants grow underwater at a depth of 8 meters. In the homeland of pesto, diving enthusiasts have come up with a way of growing basil and other plants in a process that could revolutionise crop production in arid coastal areas around the world. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
**TO GO WITH AFP FEATURE STORY BY OLIVIER MORIN, WITH ANGUS MACKINNON IN ROME. Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi, checks immersed biospheres on June 27, 2015 in Noli. Three biospheres filled with unpolluted air helps plants grow underwater at a depth of 8 meters. In the homeland of pesto, diving enthusiasts have come up with a way of growing basil and other plants in a process that could revolutionise crop production in arid coastal areas around the world. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
**TO GO WITH AFP FEATURE STORY BY OLIVIER MORIN, WITH ANGUS MACKINNON IN ROME. Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi, checks immersed biospheres on June 27, 2015 in Noli. Three biospheres filled with unpolluted air helps plants grow underwater at a depth of 8 meters. In the homeland of pesto, diving enthusiasts have come up with a way of growing basil and other plants in a process that could revolutionise crop production in arid coastal areas around the world. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi checks condensation inside immerged Biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
**TO GO WITH AFP FEATURE STORY BY OLIVIER MORIN, WITH ANGUS MACKINNON IN ROME. Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi, checks condensation inside an immersed biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. Three biospheres filled with unpolluted air helps plants grow underwater at a depth of 8 meters. In the homeland of pesto, diving enthusiasts have come up with a way of growing basil and other plants in a process that could revolutionise crop production in arid coastal areas around the world. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
**TO GO WITH AFP FEATURE STORY BY OLIVIER MORIN, WITH ANGUS MACKINNON IN ROME. Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi, checks condensation inside an immersed biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. Three biospheres filled with unpolluted air helps plants grow underwater at a depth of 8 meters. In the homeland of pesto, diving enthusiasts have come up with a way of growing basil and other plants in a process that could revolutionise crop production in arid coastal areas around the world. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
**TO GO WITH AFP FEATURE STORY BY OLIVIER MORIN, WITH ANGUS MACKINNON IN ROME. This picture taken on June 27, 2015 shows the underwater garden known as Nemo's Garden, in Noli. Three biospheres filled with unpolluted air helps plants grow underwater at a depth of 8 meters. In the homeland of pesto, diving enthusiasts have come up with a way of growing basil and other plants in a process that could revolutionise crop production in arid coastal areas around the world. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
**TO GO WITH AFP FEATURE STORY BY OLIVIER MORIN, WITH ANGUS MACKINNON IN ROME. Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi, checks immersed biospheres on June 27, 2015 in Noli. Three biospheres filled with unpolluted air helps plants grow underwater at a depth of 8 meters. In the homeland of pesto, diving enthusiasts have come up with a way of growing basil and other plants in a process that could revolutionise crop production in arid coastal areas around the world. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi sets some soil inside immerged Biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi sets some soil inside immerged Biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi set some soil inside immerged Biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi set some soil inside immerged Biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi set some soil inside immerged Biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi checks sensors inside immerged Biosphere on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi check immerged Biospheres on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO / OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi check immerged Biospheres on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Italy's Project coordinator of Nemo's Garden, Gianni Fontanesi check immerged Biospheres on June 27, 2015 in Noli. 3 biospheres with air welcome seeds of basilic and others green plants to study their grows immerged at 8m in complete autonomy thanks to the natural Photosyntesis process, protected from any pollution from the outdoor plantations. This project is part of the Italian Pavillon theme at the EXPO2015 , 'how to feed the planet'. AFP PHOTO / OLIVIER MORIN (Photo credit should read OLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images)
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