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Trinidad extradition hearing for Warner in FIFA case put off

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PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad (AP) -- Former FIFA vice president Jack Warner won more time Thursday in his fight to avoid being extradited from Trinidad and Tobago to the United States to face corruption charges.

Chief Magistrate Marcia Ayers-Ceasar set a new hearing date of July 27. Defense lawyer Nyree Alfonso said Thursday's hearing was adjourned until then because U.S. authorities had yet to send charges and a formal extradition request to Trinidad.

If the U.S. request is not filed in Trinidad in just over two weeks, Alfonso said, the defense team "can apply to the court to have the matter dismissed" under rules of the extradition treaty between the two countries.

Warner, who is busy campaigning for Sept. 7 national elections as leader of his opposition party, is currently out on bail and required to report twice weekly to a police station near his home. His passport has been seized.

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Trinidad extradition hearing for Warner in FIFA case put off
FILE - In this Thursday, June 2, 2011 file photo, suspended FIFA executive Jack Warner gestures during a news conference held shortly after his arrival at the airport in Port-of-Spain, in his native Trinidad and Tobago. Suspended FIFA Vice President Jack Warner has resigned from world football's governing body and had the corruption charges against him dropped. Warner was suspended by FIFA last month along with Asian football chief Mohamed bin Hammam over allegations of bribery during the presidential election. (AP Photo/Shirley Bahadur, File)
Members of Interpol are seen at the headquarters of Argentine sports broadcaster Torneos y Competencias during a raid in Buenos Aires on May 29, 2015. Interpol are searching for Argentine sports marketing entrepreneurs Alejandro Burzaco, Hugo Jinkis and his son Mariano Jinkis, who were among the 14 football officials and businessmen indicted Wednesday in the US investigation into massive graft at world football's governing body. AFP PHOTO/TELAM (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of the media wait outside of the headquarters of Argentine sports broadcaster Torneos y Competencias in Buenos Aires on May 29, 2015. Interpol are searching for Argentine sports marketing entrepreneurs Alejandro Burzaco, Hugo Jinkis and his son Mariano Jinkis, who were among the 14 football officials and businessmen indicted Wednesday in the US investigation into massive graft at world football's governing body. AFP PHOTO / JUAN MABROMATA (Photo credit should read JUAN MABROMATA/AFP/Getty Images)
FILE - In this May 14, 2015, file photo, CONMEBOL delegate Roger Bello, of Bolivia, left, talks with Boca Juniors goalkeeper Agustin Orion, center, and Alejandro Burzaco, right, president of Torneos y Competencias, moments before canceling the Copa Libertadores soccer match between Boca Juniors and River Plate in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Interpol added six men with ties to FIFA to its most wanted list on Wednesday, June 3, 2015, issuing an international alert for two former FIFA officials and four executives on charges including racketeering and corruption. On the list were Argentinians Alejandro Burzaco and Hugo and Mariano Jinkis, who together are accused of paying more than $100 million in bribes for media and commercial rights to soccer tournaments. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano, File)
A member of Interpol is seen speaking with staff at the headquarters of Argentine sports broadcaster Torneos y Competencias during a raid in Buenos Aires on May 29, 2015. Interpol are searching for Argentine sports marketing entrepreneurs Alejandro Burzaco, Hugo Jinkis and his son Mariano Jinkis, who were among the 14 football officials and businessmen indicted Wednesday in the US investigation into massive graft at world football's governing body. AFP PHOTO/TELAM (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
FILE - This is a May 27, 2015, file photo, showing FIFA headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland. Interpol added six men with ties to FIFA to its most wanted list on Wednesday, June 3, 2015, issuing an international alert for two former FIFA officials and four executives on charges including racketeering and corruption. Two of the men, former FIFA vice president Jack Warner of Trinidad and former executive committee member Nicolas Leoz of Paraguay, have been arrested in their home counties. Warner has since been released and Leoz is under house arrest. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)
BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA - JUNE 01: View of the facade of Argentine sports broadcaster 'Torneos' building on June 01, 2015 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Alejandro Burzaco, President of Torneos is one of the five corporate executive accused on May 27, 2015 by the United States Justice Department (along with nine FIFA officials) of racketeering, wire fraud and money laundering conspiracy. Burzaco has a position in the FIFA Sports Marketing department and is one of the three Argentines accused of paying 150 million dollars in bribes in exchange for mass media and commercialisation rights for international tournaments. (Photo by Amilcar Orfali/LatinContent/Getty Images)
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A grinning Warner emerged from the Port-of-Spain courthouse surrounded by supporters. He declined to answer questions before being whisked away in a car.

Warner is resisting extradition and has predicted a lengthy legal battle over the attempt to extradite him to the U.S. to face charges of racketeering, wire fraud and money-laundering in the FIFA corruption case.

Trinidad legal experts, including former attorney general Ramesh Maharaj, believe Warner's extradition request could take three to five years to resolve in the twin-island Caribbean republic off the coast of Venezuela.

U.S. prosecutors allege South Africa funneled $10 million in 2008 to Warner and two other FIFA executive committee members as payment for them supporting that country's successful bid to host the 2010 World Cup.

Officials also allege Warner and others, including former FIFA executive committee member Chuck Blazer of the United States, got rich off accounts they controlled through CONCACAF, which oversees soccer in the Caribbean and North and Central America. Blazer has cooperated with authorities.

Warner left FIFA in 2011 after being implicated in an earlier bribery scandal. He has denied wrongdoing.

Related: Former FIFA exec banned from all soccer related activities for life

Life Ban for Ex-FIFA Exec Chuck Blazer

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