Here's what NYSE trading looked like before and after the outage

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Stock Exchange issues, July 8
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Here's what NYSE trading looked like before and after the outage
Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. Hong Kong's main stock index plummeted as much as 8.5 percent on Wednesday as a sell-off in mainland Chinese shares accelerated despite new measures to support the market; U.S. stocks were poised to open lower. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. Hong Kong's main stock index plummeted as much as 8.5 percent on Wednesday as a sell-off in mainland Chinese shares accelerated despite new measures to support the market; U.S. stocks were poised to open lower. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A man is reflected in a screen showing stock indexes of Asian markets at Hong Kong Exchanges in Hong Kong, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. The Hang Seng Index has dropped in morning trading following more big losses on mainland markets. Chinese stocks led a slump in Asian markets on Wednesday as the sell-off in Shanghai intensified and Greece's future in the euro remained highly uncertain. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. Hong Kong's main stock index plummeted as much as 8.5 percent on Wednesday as a sell-off in mainland Chinese shares accelerated despite new measures to support the market; U.S. stocks were poised to open lower. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. Hong Kong's main stock index plummeted as much as 8.5 percent on Wednesday as a sell-off in mainland Chinese shares accelerated despite new measures to support the market; U.S. stocks were poised to open lower. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. Hong Kong's main stock index plummeted as much as 8.5 percent on Wednesday as a sell-off in mainland Chinese shares accelerated despite new measures to support the market; U.S. stocks were poised to open lower. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Screens display financial information on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. Hong Kong's main stock index plummeted as much as 8.5 percent on Wednesday as a sell-off in mainland Chinese shares accelerated despite new measures to support the market; U.S. stocks were poised to open lower. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. Hong Kong's main stock index plummeted as much as 8.5 percent on Wednesday as a sell-off in mainland Chinese shares accelerated despite new measures to support the market; U.S. stocks were poised to open lower. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. Hong Kong's main stock index plummeted as much as 8.5 percent on Wednesday as a sell-off in mainland Chinese shares accelerated despite new measures to support the market; U.S. stocks were poised to open lower. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. Hong Kong's main stock index plummeted as much as 8.5 percent on Wednesday as a sell-off in mainland Chinese shares accelerated despite new measures to support the market; U.S. stocks were poised to open lower. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. Hong Kong's main stock index plummeted as much as 8.5 percent on Wednesday as a sell-off in mainland Chinese shares accelerated despite new measures to support the market; U.S. stocks were poised to open lower. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. Hong Kong's main stock index plummeted as much as 8.5 percent on Wednesday as a sell-off in mainland Chinese shares accelerated despite new measures to support the market; U.S. stocks were poised to open lower. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
People sit on a bench near the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, July 8, 2015. Hong Kong's main stock index plummeted as much as 8.5 percent on Wednesday as a sell-off in mainland Chinese shares accelerated despite new measures to support the market. U.S. stocks were poised to open lower. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
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At 11:32 am on Wednesday, the NYSE stopped trading.

As yet, no one knows why. The NYSE has said that's it's not a hack though.

"The issue we are experiencing is an internal technical issue and is not the result of a cyber breach," the NYSE tweeted out about an hour after the halt. "We chose to suspend trading on NYSE to avoid problems arising from our technical issue. NYSE-listed securities continue to trade unaffected on other market centers."

Software experts tell Business Insider that this could be a problem with NYSE's stock pricing program, similar to what happened at the NASDQ in August 2013.

Additionally, Eric Hunsader, CEO of market research firm Nanex, says that these things can happen when a software system's update goes wrong.

He tweeted out this chart of what it looked like in the world of exchanges when everything went south.

Contrast that with what exchanges look like on a normal day, like Tuesday.

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