Guy in a wingsuit flies through a 6-foot hole in a cliff in 'possibly the most difficult BASE jump ever'

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Wingsuit Enthusiast Tests New Flight Paths in Switzerland

Italian wingsuit flier Uli Emanuele pulled off what GoPro is calling "possibly the most technical and difficult BASE jump ever" in the Swiss Alps..

In a video of the flight from GoPro, Emanuele identified a rock formation that's about two meters (6.5 feet) across at its widest point:

wingsuit flight widest point

(Photo credit: GoPro)

He said on Facebook that he trained for the flight for three years, and hiked for 45 hours to get to the launching point that gave him the best angle.

At the start of his jump, his target was a tiny dot on the horizon:

wingsuit flight

(Photo credit: GoPro)

At the moment of truth, he squeezed through it:

wingsuit flight mountain
(Photo credit: GoPro)

Look how fast he's going:

go pro fast wingsuit

(Photo credit: GoPro)

Wingsuit legend Jeb Corliss congratulated Emanuele on Facebook, writing, "Super impressive bro, you have been doing some truly amazing jumps and are pushing things farther than I could ever have imagined. Good work but please be careful, we don't usually know where that line is until after we have crossed it. With what we do crossing the line usually means game over..."

The entire GoPro video of the flight is nuts:

See more stunning views of the Swiss Alps:

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Guy in a wingsuit flies through a 6-foot hole in a cliff in 'possibly the most difficult BASE jump ever'
IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR MAMMUT – Swiss mountain sports specialist Mammut is opening up new horizons on the Matterhorn with it’s “Project360” taking digital mapping into a new dimension by bringing a virtual climbing experience to the public of one of the highest mountains in the Swiss Alp. Mammut professional climbers David Fasel and Stephan Siegrist each carried specially designed backpacks equipped with six cameras to capture the 360 degree panoramic view while scaling the legendary mountain and the results of their efforts can be viewed at www.project360.matterhorn.ch. A Fisheye lens view of the climbers on the Hornligrat route of the Matterhorn. Many other exciting peaks are still to follow. (Mammut/Concept360/Photopress via AP Images)

View from Mount Titlis in the Swiss Alps.

(Photo: Geir Petterson, Getty)

A paraglider is seen over the Silberplattenchoepfe mountains in the Swiss Alps near Unterwasser, Switzerland, Wednesday Sept. 30, 2009. (AP Photo/Keystone, Arno Balzarini)

Lake in the Swiss Alps

(Photo via Getty)

IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR MAMMUT – Swiss mountain sports specialist Mammut is opening up new horizons on the Matterhorn with it’s “Project360” taking digital mapping into a new dimension by bringing a virtual climbing experience to the public of one of the highest mountains in the Swiss Alp. Mammut professional climbers David Fasel and Stephan Siegrist each carried specially designed backpacks equipped with six cameras to capture the 360 degree panoramic view while scaling the legendary mountain and the results of their efforts can be viewed at www.project360.matterhorn.ch. The climbers are completely exposed as they use the Hornligrat route to climb the Matterhorn carrying the camera backpacks. Many other exciting peaks are still to follow. (Christian Gisi/Mammut/Photopress via AP Images)

Alps in Zermatt, Switzerland

(Photo via Shutterstock)

Swiss Alpine landscape.

(Photo: Vladimir Badaev, Shutterstock)

Cable cars travelling through snowy mountainous landscape in Swiss Alps.

(Photo via Getty)

Yves Rossy, known as the 'Fusion Man,' flies with a jet-powered single wing over the Alps in Bex, Switzerland, Wednesday, May 14, 2008. Some people go fishing on their day off. Yves Rossy likes to jump out of a small plane with a pair of jet-powered wings and perform figure eights above the Swiss Alps. The revolutionary human flying machine comes after five years of training and many more years of dreaming. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
Mount Matterhorn glows in the last rays of the day as it is reflected in Lake Riffelsee in the Swiss Alps near Zermatt, Switzerland in this undated photo. The sheer majesty of the mountain - described back in the mid-19th century as "the peak people wish to see," - has lured millions of admirers and turned the village of Zermatt into a sought-after destination. (AP photo/Thomas C. Gerber)
Solar Impulse's Chief Executive Officer and pilot Andre Borschberg fly near the Alps in the solar-powered HB-SIA prototype airplane with the Alps in the background for its first night flight attempt near Payerne airport Wednesday,July 7, 2010. A Swiss team planning to eventually circle the globe in a solar-powered plane has started a 24-hour test flight that aims to keep the aircraft operating through the night on stored energy collected from the sun. (AP Photo/Keystone/Denis Balibouse/Pool)
A young fisher enjoys a sunny day with mild temperatures at a lake on the Goescheneralp in the central Swiss alps, on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009. (AP Photo/Keystone, Urs Flueeler)
A hiker above Triesen in Liechtenstein enjoys the view over the sea of fog to the Swiss mountain Alvier and the Alps of Glarus and Appenzell, Saturday, Oct. 25, 2008. (AP Photo/Keystone, Arno Balzarini)
The rising sun colors the clouds red in the sky above the Alps and the Geneva Lake, in Rolle, Switzerland, Tuesday, November 27, 2007. Meteorologists predict sunny and cold weather for the next days. (KEYSTONE/Laurent Gillieron)
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