Would you join a 'sin free' Facebook?

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Recently, a group of Evangelical Christians based in Brazil were fed up with Facebook's "sinful" ways. In reaction to posts involving cursing and inappropriate pictures, the religious group created Facegloria -- the alternative to the popular social media site.

But there's a catch.

Currently, there are 600 words which are forbidden on the site in addition to a ban on erotic and gay content. Web designer Atilla Barros notes to AFP, "On Facebook you see a lot of violence and pornography. That's why we thought of creating a network where we could talk about God, love and to spread His word."

Barros, along with his three co-creators took inspiration for the platform from mainstay Facebook features; there is an "Amen" button in place of "likes", for starters.

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FaceGloria: Sin free facebook like site
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Would you join a 'sin free' Facebook?
A man uses his profile in the social network for evangelicals FaceGloria, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on June 29, 2015. The page, which was created to discuss issues such as love, the word of God and the Christian faith and where dirty language and violent and erotic content is forbidden, attracted more than 100,000 in one month. (Photo credit: Miguel Schincariol/AFP/Getty Images)
 A man uses his profile in the social network for evangelicals FaceGloria, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on June 29, 2015. The page, which was created to discuss issues such as love, the word of God and the Christian faith and where dirty language and violent and erotic content is forbidden, attracted more than 100,000 in one month. (Photo credit: Miguel Schincariol/AFP/Getty Images)
 (L-R) Thiago, Davis, Daiane and Atilla, creators of the social network for evangelicals, FaceGloria, pose during an interview in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on June 29, 2015. The page, which was created to discuss issues such as love, the word of God and the Christian faith and where dirty language and violent and erotic content is forbidden, attracted more than 100,000 in one month.  (Photo credit: Miguel Schincariol/AFP/Getty Images)
 Picture of a laptop displaying the homepage of the social network for evangelicals, FaceGloria, as its creator (L-R) Davis, Thiago, Atilla and Daiane, offer an interview in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on June 29, 2015. The page, which was created to discuss issues such as love, the word of God and the Christian faith and where dirty language and violent and erotic content is forbidden, attracted more than 100,000 in one month. (Photo credit: Miguel Schincariol/AFP/Getty Images)
Signed up with Facegloria , even though it is in Portuguese not English. Anyway's just showing support, I like the the motive.
#Facegloria: The Facebook in which you click 'Amen' instead of 'like'. http://t.co/RXll5C2U5R
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This isn't the first time a religious social network has gained mass appeal. In 2013, Ummaland, a social network for Muslims, garnered 329,000 members.

Since its release last month, Facegloria has attracted over 100,000 members and continues to grow. The team behind the site is quick to note that although the site is currently only available in Portuguese, they have their eyes on global expansion.

Their ultimate goal is to reach millions of users on across the world. In an effort to do so, the group has recently bought the domain in English in addition to a number of other languages and plans to roll out a mobile app later this year.

Would you join a "sin free" Facebook? Leave you comments below!

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