These little neon creatures help our planet just by being alive

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Hundreds Of Vents Leaking Methane From Atlantic Sea Floor

Amazing underwater photographs recently surfaced, exposing tiny little fluorescent sea creatures. The little animals come in different colors from bright orange to neon pink, and researches have found that the creatures may be able to help determine methane levels.

By merely being alive, the sea creatures could be able to determine how much of the potent greenhouse gas will make its way to the atmosphere, therefore contributing to climate change.

A scientist who went on the expedition and helped take pictures said:

See photos of the creatures below:

6 PHOTOS
Neon creatures on the Arctic floor
See Gallery
These little neon creatures help our planet just by being alive
Seafloor at 500 m water depth. Carbonate blocks are colonized by anemones and sponges. Tube worms are abundant at the seafloor. In the upper part of the image, we see patches of bacterial mats. All of these features are indigenous to sites of methane release. Photo: CAGE
Abundance of tube worms in the ocean floor surface imply release of methane gas from the sediments. Photo: CAGE
A school of codfish appeared to be following the laser beams from the camera system. Fish were often observed in big quantities during the cruise. Photo: CAGE
During the Tow cam surveys in deep water (1200 m) we have observed many skate fish. This skate is about 80 cm. The seafloor is densely colonized by white brittle stars and tube worms. Photo: CAGE
A crinoid is an ocean animal that has long, feathery arms that extend into the water column and use their tiny, sticky tube feet to pick up particles for food. Photo: CAGE
Dr. Giuliana Panieri and Dr. Dan Fornari with the tow cam system aboard research vessel Helmer Hanssen. Dr. Fornari developed the tow cam system and had adapted it to CAGE platform. Photo: CAGE/E.Åström.
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


These recently discovered creatures are so vital because they live near methane seeps. Methane seeps are cracks in the ocean floor that naturally release methane. While these seeps are capable of forming anywhere along both continental margins and the floor of the sea, these creatures are bringing a new light to the global and climate issues that the gas creates.

Notably, the only thing that methane seeps need to function is organic matter, and that's what dead organisms provide. The matter releases methane as it decomposes.

Panieri also said, "We want to define and to calculate how much methane is consumed by these organisms to then determine how much methane can escape to the atmosphere."

The expedition team is investigating past emissions of methane and the effects it has had on ancient climate. Gaining a clearer understanding past methane concentrations could help researchers explain the cause of the actual methane releases.

See below for a gallery of more amazing sea creatures:

17 PHOTOS
COOL FISHES, sea creatures, fish, ocean
See Gallery
These little neon creatures help our planet just by being alive
Photo via Getty
Photo via Getty
Photo via Getty
Photo via Getty
Photo via Getty
Photo: Jeff Hunter via Getty
Photo via Shutterstock
Photo: Toshifumi Kitamura via Getty
A common clownfish - Amphiprion percular - in an aquarium is photographed during a media preview of 'Coral Reef - Secret Cities of the Sea' exhibition at the Natural History museum in London, Wednesday, March, 25, 2015. The museum'€™s new show plunges into the underwater world, featuring a 'virtual dive' that provides a 180-degree view of five coral reefs controlled by a joystick, including one vista with a manta ray in Komodo Island, Indonesia. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)
Photo via Getty
Photo via Getty
Photo via Getty
Photo via Getty
Photo via Getty
|Color Image|Horizontal|Full Length|Underwater View|Nobody|Outdoors|Animal Themes|Animal|Fish|Saltwater Fish|Ray|Stingray|Bluespotted Stingray|One Animal|Blue|Adult Animal|Pattern|Spotted|Water|Sea|Red Sea|Wildlife|Animals In The Wild|Africa|North Africa|Egypt|Tropical Fish|Sea Life|112070|V112|VOL_112|112070.JPG|
Photo via Getty
Photo via Getty
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


More from AOL.com:
Mom designs amazing hearing aids for children
Parents force teen to live in woods after eating Pop-Tart
Reddit's 'Selfies of the Soul' collection is brilliant

Read Full Story

People are Reading