Oklahoma court: Ten Commandments monument must come down

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Controversial Ten Commandments Statue Destroyed at Oklahoma Capitol

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma's Supreme Court says the Ten Commandments monument at the state Capitol must be removed because it indirectly benefits the Jewish and Christian faiths in violation of the state's constitution.

The court ruled Tuesday that the Oklahoma Constitution bans using public property to benefit a religion, and said the Ten Commandments are "obviously religious in nature."

More on the history of the statue:

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Oklahoma court: Ten Commandments monument must come down
The Ten Commandments monument is pictured at the state Capitol in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Oklahoma's Supreme Court says the monument must be removed because it indirectly benefits the Jewish and Christian faiths in violation of the state constitution. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
AUSTIN, TX - OCTOBER 15: The Ten Commandments Monument displayed at the Texas State Capitol October 15, 2004 in Austin, Texas. The U.S. Supreme Court is considering whether displaying the Ten Commandments on government property violates the constitutional ban on government endorsement of religion. (Photo by Jana Birchum/Getty Images)
A statue of the ten commandments is seen knocked over in front of the headquarters of Faith and Action, a Christian outreach ministry, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Sept. 23, 2013. The 3-foot-by-3-foot granite monument, weighing 850 pounds, sits on a street behind the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington and was the subject of past controversy has been toppled by vandals. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
The damaged remains of a Ten Commandments monument are gathered on the Oklahoma State Capitol grounds Friday, Oct. 24, 2014 in Oklahoma City. Authorities say someone drove across the Oklahoma Capitol lawn and knocked over the monument. The American Civil Liberties Union had been suing to have the monument removed, arguing it violates the Oklahoma Constitution. (AP Photo/Sean Murphy)
From left, Pete Bennett, Riley Harrison, and Chuck Gardner, state workers for the Office of Management and Enterprise Services remove the damaged remains of a Ten Commandments monument from the Oklahoma State Capitol grounds Friday, Oct. 24, 2014 in Oklahoma City. Authorities say someone drove across the Oklahoma Capitol lawn and knocked over the monument. The American Civil Liberties Union had been suing to have the monument removed, arguing it violates the Oklahoma Constitution. (AP Photo/Sean Murphy)
From left, Pete Bennett and Darin Brinson, state workers for the Office of Management and Enterprise Services remove the damaged remains of a Ten Commandments monument from the Oklahoma State Capitol grounds Friday, Oct. 24, 2014 in Oklahoma City. Authorities say someone drove across the Oklahoma Capitol lawn and knocked over the monument. The American Civil Liberties Union had been suing to have the monument removed, arguing it violates the Oklahoma Constitution. (AP Photo/Sean Murphy)
File - This June 20, 2014 file photo is the Ten Commandments monument at the state Capitol in Oklahoma City. The privately funded monument on the grounds of the Oklahoma Capitol does not violate the state constitution and can stay there, an Oklahoma County judge said Friday, Sept. 19, 2014 in a ruling that attorneys who filed the lawsuit in question vowed to appeal to the state Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
From left, Pete Bennett and Darin Brinson, state workers for the Office of Management and Enterprise Services remove the damaged remains of a Ten Commandments monument from the Oklahoma State Capitol grounds Friday, Oct. 24, 2014 in Oklahoma City. Authorities say someone drove across the Oklahoma Capitol lawn and knocked over the monument. The American Civil Liberties Union had been suing to have the monument removed, arguing it violates the Oklahoma Constitution. (AP Photo/Sean Murphy)
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Attorney General Scott Pruitt argued that the monument is nearly identical to a Texas monument that was found constitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court. Oklahoma justices said the local monument violates Oklahoma's constitution.

Private funds were used to erect the monument in 2012. Since then, others have asked for space, including a Nevada Hindu leader, animal rights advocates, the satirical Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster and a group pushing for a Satan statue.

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