It's National Meteor Watch Day!

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What Happens When a Meteor Strikes Earth?


June 30th Marks National Meteor Watch Day, and the Pachamama Alliance reports that the U.S. is the only country that considers this a national day of recognition with the sole purpose of encouraging people to take time to watch meteors, otherwise known as shooting stars.

Earthsky has the ultimate meteor shower guide, so grab a blanket and go check out the stars.

The website timeanddate.com notes that meteors are commonly known as shooting stars, and they are space particles known as meteoroids that burn up with a flash of light when they enter the Earth's atmosphere. Even though meteors can only be seen by the naked eye when it is dark, meteoroids enter the Earth's atmosphere all the time. It is estimated that about 20 to 25 million meteors weighing about 100 tinnes in total enter the Earth's atmosphere every day!

If you're curious about space facts in general, go to spacefacts.com to learn more about meteor showers and anything about space in general!

Meanwhile, check out the pictures of the Lyrid meteor shower:
5 PHOTOS
Lyrid meteor shower
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It's National Meteor Watch Day!
This long-exposure photograph taken on April 23, 2013 on Earth Day shows Lyrids meteors shower passing near the Milky Way in the clear night sky of Thanlyin, nearly 14miles away from Yangon. (Photo credit: Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images)
This long-exposure photograph taken on April 23, 2013 on Earth Day shows Lyrids meteors shower passing near the Milky Way in the clear night sky of Thanlyin, nearly 14miles away from Yangon. (Photo credit: Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images)

Trail from a meteor over rice fields and houses in Kagawa Prefecture, Japan.

(photo credit: Jake Jung via Getty Images)

Lyrids Meteor Shower 2013 Sierra Nevada Mountains California USA

(photo credit: Shutterstock)

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Also take a pic at the Geminid meteor shower:
9 PHOTOS
Geminid meteor shower
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It's National Meteor Watch Day!
Japan, Tokai Region, Shizuoka Prefecture, Fujinomiya-shi, Geminid Meteor Shower in sky. (Photo by: JTB/UIG via Getty Images)
A Geminid meteor can be seen in the sky near Warsaw on December 13, 2012. The meteor display, known as the Geminid meteor shower because it appears to radiate from the constellation Gemini, is thought to be the result of debris cast off from an asteroid-like object called 3200 Phaethon. The shower is visible every December. AFP PHOTO/JANEK SKARZYNSKI (Photo credit should read JANEK SKARZYNSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A general view of the Geminid meteor shower in the National Park of El Teide on the Spanish canary island of Tenerife on December 13, 2012. AFP PHOTO / DESIREE MARTIN (Photo credit should read DESIREE MARTIN/AFP/Getty Images)
A general view of the Geminid meteor shower in the National Park of El Teide on the Spanish canary island of Tenerife on December 13, 2012. AFP PHOTO / DESIREE MARTIN (Photo credit should read DESIREE MARTIN/AFP/Getty Images)
VICTORVILLE, USA - DECEMBER 14: This incredible picture shows a huge meteor hurtling to earth during the annual Geminid meteor shower on December 14, 2009. Taken from the Mojave Desert area near Victorville under a very dark and mostly clear sky, astro-photogrpaher Wally Pacholka captured this amazing picture during the annual cosmic fireworks show. The meteor shower has been growing in intensity in recent decades and was an even better holiday treat than usual this year with it falling in a nearly moonless week. Featuring as many as 140 shooting stars per hour, the Geminid show took place between Sunday evening and Monday morning. (Photo by Wally Pacholka / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
VALLEY OF FIRE STATE PARK, NV - DECEMBER 14: A Geminid meteor streaks diagonally across the sky against a field of star trails over one of the peaks of the Seven Sisters rock formation early December 14, 2007 in the Valley of Fire State Park in Nevada. The meteor display, known as the Geminid meteor shower because it appears to radiate from near the star Castor in the constellation Gemini, is thought to be the result of debris cast off from an asteroid-like object called 3200 Phaethon. The shower is visible every December. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
A meteor is seen streaking left to right above the constellation Orion in the early hours of Dec. 14, 2012 in the sky above Tyler, Texas. The metor is part of the Geminid meteor shower, which is peaking tonight. As many as 50 per hour are being seen. The meteors radiate from the region of sky containing the constellation Gemini which give them their name. (AP Photo/Dr. Scott M. Lieberman)
The Geminid Meteor Shower is arguably the best meteor shower of the year. I stayed up until 3 AM to get the shot here, taken at the Paint Mines in Calhan, Colorado. Minor light pollution from Colorado Springs is seen at bottom left, with 12 meteors in the frame. It was an amazing sight to behold, with meteors flashing in the night sky causing the ground to get lit up.
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