No air conditioner? Here's how to cool down your home

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
5 Ways to Cool Your Home Without A/C at Night

SEATTLE (Q13FOX) — An air conditioning unit just might be the easiest way to cool down your home (many local retailers, including The Home Depot, recently received new shipments in recent days), but for many of us, it's simply too expensive or impractical.

Fear not! We have some solutions for both day and night.

Madison Stenek with The Home Depot brought in some great examples of inexpensive things we can all do to keep our home cool. "One of the easiest things you can do year-round is to properly insulate your home," she said. Aside from standard insulation, this includes weather sealants you can use on your windows and doors. There's even a window sealant kit she shows us that uses a window film that can reportedly save you $500 a year in energy costs. Stenek estimates about 50% of heat and cooling air gets out through gaps you have in your windows and doors.

See the photos: May 2015 was the hottest May on record:

21 PHOTOS
Hottest months, global heat waves - May 2015 hottest/wettest month
See Gallery
No air conditioner? Here's how to cool down your home
People sunbathe in a beach in Barcelona, Spain, Friday, May 15, 2015. The Iberian Peninsula has experienced record high temperatures for May as thermometers shot up to levels normally only seen in midsummer. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Jordyn Chin, 5, plays in the fountain at Dilworth Park Friday, June 12, 2015, in Philadelphia. Officials say Philadelphia's public schools are closing early due to heat. The National Weather Service predicts a high of 93 degrees in the city. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
FILE - In this Sunday, May 31, 2015 file photo, an Indian man rests in front of an air cooler to cool himself on a hot summer day in Hyderabad, in the southern Indian state of Telangana. Isolated thundershowers have failed to break a raging heat wave in the southern Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, claiming dozens of lives over the weekend and raising the overall death toll to more than 2,000 since mid-April. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A., File)
Laborers cover their faces as they ride a truck on a highway in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, May 27, 2015, during a sandstorm and a heat wave. Temperatures are soaring across the Middle East, with winds and sandstorms driving people indoors as unlucky pedestrians try to shield themselves from the sun with books, newspapers or anything they can find. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)
An Indian man bathes in water from a roadside tap in Kolkata, India, Sunday, May 31, 2015. Heat-related conditions, including dehydration and heat stroke, have killed more than 2,000 people since mid-April in the southern Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, according to state officials. (AP Photo/ Bikas Das)
Indian boys cool themselves at a fountain on a hot day in New Delhi, India, Monday, May 18, 2015. Intense heat-wave continues to grip several parts of north India with most of the cities crossing 40 degrees Celsius (104 degrees Fahrenheit) mark. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal)
Indian men cover their head with handkerchief as they walks in the rain at Nehru Zoological Park in Hyderabad, India, Friday, May 29, 2015. According to weather reports, the heat wave scorching vast parts of the country would continue for a few more days though cloudy skies and sporadic showers have brought relief to the people in some states. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)
An Indian boy jumps into the Ranbir water canal to cool on a hot summer day in Jammu, India, Monday, May 25, 2015. Severe heat wave conditions continue to prevail at several places in northern India with temperatures reaching 48 degrees Celsius (118 degrees Fahrenheit). (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
An Indian child plays in front of a water sprinkler to cool off on a hot summer day at Nehru Zoological Park in Hyderabad, India, Friday, May 29, 2015. Dizzying temperatures caused water shortages in thousands of Indian villages and killed hundreds more people over the past day, driving the death toll from a weeks long heat wave to more than 1,000, officials said Friday. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)
Israelis and tourists relax on the beach in Tel Aviv, Israel, Wednesday, May 27, 2015. Israel is experiencing a heat wave with temperatures reaching about 42 degrees Celsius (107.6 degrees Fahrenheit) in Tel Aviv. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
An Indian passenger takes a bath beside rail tracks on a hot summer day at a railway station in Jammu, India, Monday, May 25, 2015. Severe heat wave conditions continue to prevail at several places in northern India with temperatures reaching 48 degrees Celsius (118 degrees Fahrenheit). (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
A boy plays by a fountain in Seoul on May 26, 2015 as temperatures soared to a high of 34 centigrade across South Korea. The Korea Meteorological Administration issued on May 25 this year's first heat wave advisory as it expects temperatures to exceed 33 degrees for the next few days. AFP PHOTO / JUNG YEON-JE (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
Pakistani children cool off in a polluted canal in Islamabad, Pakistan, where temperature rose on Friday, May 29, 2015. Many cities in Pakistan are facing heat wave conditions with temperatures reaching 46 degrees Celsius (114.8 Fahrenheit) in some places. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)
A man drinks water from a bottle as he quenches thirst to beat the scorching heat in Mumbai, India, Friday, May 29, 2015. Dizzying temperatures caused water shortages in thousands of Indian villages and killed hundreds more people over the past day, driving the death toll from a weeks long heat wave to more than 1,000, officials said Friday. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)
Indians play in a water pool at Jalavihar water park on a hot summer day in Hyderabad, India, Tuesday, May 19, 2015. Heat wave continued in many parts of northern Indian even as capital Delhi witnessed season's first severe storm on Tuesday bringing temporary relief from the heat, according to local reports. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)
People sunbathe in a public park in Barcelona, Spain, Friday, May 15, 2015. The Iberian Peninsula has experienced record high temperatures for May as thermometers shot up to levels normally only seen in midsummer. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
An Indian commuter cools off by bathing in the water from a supply pipe by the tracks at a railway station in Allahabad, India, Sunday, May 3, 2015. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)
A white tiger swims in a pool at Nehru Zoological Park in the Indian city of Hyderabad on May 29, 2015. Hospitals in India battled May 28, 2015, to treat victims of a blistering heatwave that has claimed more than 1,700 lives in just over a week -- the highest number recorded in two decades. Hundreds of mainly poor people die at the height of summer every year in India, but this year's figures are already the highest since 1995, when official data shows 1,677 people succumbed to the heat. AFPHOTO/ Noah SEELAM (Photo credit should read NOAH SEELAM/AFP/Getty Images)
Indian horseman Rahul and his horses cool off in a canal on the outskirts of Jalandhar on May 28, 2015, as scorching weather conditions continue across India. More than 1,100 people have died in a blistering heatwave sweeping India, authorities said, as forecasters warned searing temperatures would continue. AFP PHOTO/SHAMMI MEHRA (Photo credit should read SHAMMI MEHRA/AFP/Getty Images)
A mirage shimmers over Rajpath leading to India Gate in New Delhi on May 28, 2015. More than 1,100 people have died in a blistering heatwave sweeping India, authorities said, as forecasters warned searing temperatures would continue. AFP PHOTO / Chandan KHANNA (Photo credit should read Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Something you may not have heard of using before: window films, both decorative and heat-resistant. The films are easy to apply with an application kit, and can help keep the heat out. BONUS: They're easy to put up and to remove.

For night time, fans are especially important, and Stenek pointed out the focus should be on the direction the fans face. A 'twin window fan' can adjust to fit right inside your window; a stand-alone fan can circulate cooler air inside. Combining these two types of fans just might be the key to a good night's sleep: "What most people don't know is if you actually turn [the twin window fan] the opposite way, and you have a circulating fan as well in your room, it's going to suck a lot of the heat out."

Do you have a ceiling fan? Little known fact: make sure it's set to spin counter-clockwise, as that will allow the heat to come up and out instead of swirling the hot air around.

And when all-else fails, Stenek says to drink a glass of cold water before going to bed!

Watch the videos for more ideas on keeping your home cool this summer, and remember: if you do decide to invest in an air conditioning unit, there are a lot of options. We are running through some of them live on the show this Friday at 7:20am.

How to cool your home during the day:

6 Ways to Cool Your Home Without A/C During the Day

Read Full Story

Sign up for Best Bites by AOL and receive delicious recipes delivered to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners