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Obama: "Shame on You" to White House Heckler


1. President Obama shut down a heckler at a gay pride month reception at the White House Wednesday. "You're in my house," Obama scolded. Read more here.

2. A second prison worker has been linked with the escape of inmates Richard Matt and David Sweat. The prison guard allegedly delivered frozen meat with tools hidden inside to help the convicts escape. Read more here.

Click through the gallery to learn about the ongoing search:
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Convicted felons escape from NY prison - Escape photos
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What to know this morning: In 5 minutes or less
FILE - This combination of file photos released by the New York State Police shows David Sweat, left, and Richard Matt. Matt, who staged a brazen escape from an upstate maximum-security prison with Sweat and had been hunted for three weeks was shot and killed Friday, June 26, 2015. Sweat was shot and captured on Sunday, June 28. (New York State Police via AP, File)
An annotated aerial image of the Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, N.Y. shows where the prisoners escaped and provides details of the prison. Included are mugshots of the escapees and description of their crimes. (Image via AP)
A manhole cover that was part of a prison escape is shown, Tuesday, June 16, 2015, in Dannemora, N.Y. The 11th day of searching for two prisoners that escaped from the Clinton Correctional Facility began Tuesday with roadblocks still in place. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
A manhole cover is shown in an intersection, Tuesday, June 16, 2015, in Dannemora, N.Y. Eleven days earlier the manhole was part of an escape route for two prisoners from the Clinton Correctional Facility, rear. The 11th day of searching began Tuesday with roadblocks still in place. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Razor wire covers a fence at the Clinton Correctional Facility, Monday, June 15, 2015 in Dannemora, N.Y. State police say more than 800 law enforcement officers are pushing on in the hunt for convicted murderers David Sweat and Richard Matt 10 days after the two escaped from the maximum-security prison in rural New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
UNDATED: In this handout from the New York State Police, a progression image of escaped inmate Richard Matt is seen. Matt and fellow inmate David Sweat escaped from the Clinton Correctional Facility in upstate New York on June 6, and a manhunt for them is ongoing. The image is intended to show what the inmate would look like after almost two weeks on the run. (Photo by New York State Police via Getty Images)
UNDATED: In this handout from the New York State Police, a progression image of escaped inmate David Sweat is seen. Sweat and fellow inmate Richard Matt escaped from the Clinton Correctional Facility in upstate New York on June 6, and a manhunt for them is ongoing. The image is intended to show what the inmate would look like after almost two weeks on the run. (Photo by New York State Police via Getty Images)
An employee leaves the Clinton Correctional Facility, Wednesday, June 17, 2015 in Dannemora, N.Y. Search teams are back in the woods of northern New York looking for two convicted murderers who broke out of the maximum-security prison a week and a half ago. More than 800 law enforcement officers are in the 12th day of searching for David Sweat and Richard Matt. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
An employee leaves the Clinton Correctional Facility, Wednesday, June 17, 2015 in Dannemora, N.Y. Search teams are back in the woods of northern New York looking for two convicted murderers who broke out of the maximum-security prison a week and a half ago. More than 800 law enforcement officers are in the 12th day of searching for David Sweat and Richard Matt. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
PLATTSBURGH, NY - JUNE 15: Joyce Mitchell (L) , a prison worker who allegedly helped two convicts escape from prison, is lead from Plattsburgh Ciy Court after a hearing on June 15, 2015 in Plattsburgh, New York. The convicts, Richard Matt and David Sweat, escaped sometime during the night between June 5 and June 6 from the Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, New York and law enforcement are on a multi-state manhunt for their capture. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
This photo provided by the New York State Police shows Gene Palmer on Wednesday, June 24, 2015. The maximum-security prison guard believed to have delivered tools inside frozen meat to two inmates before they escaped was arrested on Wednesday, authorities said. (New York State Police via AP)
A New York State Police officer escorts suspended Clinton Correctional Facility guard Gene Palmer, left, from Plattsburgh Town Court in Plattsburgh, N.Y., Wednesday, June 24, 2015. Palmer is believed to have delivered tools inside frozen meat to two Clinton Correctional Facility inmates before they escaped on June 6. He faces charges including promoting prison contraband and tampering with physical evidence, state police said. (Rob Fountain/The Press-Republican via AP)
PLATTSBURGH, NY - JUNE 15: Joyce Mitchell (L) appears before Judge Buck Rogers in Plattsburgh City Court on June 15, 2015 in Plattsburgh, New York. Mitchell allegedly aided inmates Richard Matt and David Sweat in their escape from Clinton Correctional Facility. They were discovered missing the morning of June 6. (Photo by G.N. Miller - Pool/Getty Images)
DANNERMORA, NY - JUNE 6: In this handout from the New York State Governor's Office, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is shown the escape path where two convicted murderers fled from the Clinton Correctional Facility June 6, 2014 in Dannemora, New York. Police are on a manhunt for Richard Matt, 48, and David Sweat, 34, who escaped from the maximum security prison June 6, 2015 using power tools and going through a manhole. (Photo by Darren McGee/New York State Governor's Office via Getty Images)
DANNERMORA, NY - JUNE 6: In this handout from the New York State Governor's Office, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is shown the escape path where two convicted murderers fled from the Clinton Correctional Facility June 6, 2014 in Dannemora, New York. Police are on a manhunt for Richard Matt, 48, and David Sweat, 34, who escaped from the maximum security prison June 6, 2015 using power tools and going through a manhole. (Photo by Darren McGee/New York State Governor's Office via Getty Images)
DANNERMORA, NY - JUNE 6: In this handout from the New York State Governor's Office, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is shown the escape path where two convicted murderers fled from the Clinton Correctional Facility June 6, 2014 in Dannemora, New York. Police are on a manhunt for Richard Matt, 48, and David Sweat, 34, who escaped from the maximum security prison June 6, 2015 using power tools and going through a manhole. (Photo by Darren McGee/New York State Governor's Office via Getty Images)
DANNERMORA, NY - JUNE 6: In this handout from the New York State Governor's Office, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo walks past jail cells where two convicted murderers fled from the Clinton Correctional Facility June 6, 2014 in Dannemora, New York. Police are on a manhunt for Richard Matt, 48, and David Sweat, 34, who escaped from the maximum security prison June 6, 2015 using power tools and going through a manhole. (Photo by Darren McGee/New York State Governor's Office via Getty Images)
DANNERMORA, NY - JUNE 6: In this handout from the New York State Governor's Office, shoes a note where two convicted murderers used power tools to cut through steel pipes at the Clinton Correctional Facility June 6, 2014 in Dannemora, New York. Richard Matt, 48, and David Sweat, 34, escaped from the maximum security prison June 6, 2015 using power tools and going through a manhole. (Photo by Darren McGee/New York State Governor's Office via Getty Images)
DANNERMORA, NY - JUNE 6: In this handout from the New York State Governor's Office, shows where two convicted murderers escaped from the Clinton Correctional Facility June 6, 2014 in Dannemora, New York. Richard Matt, 48, and David Sweat, 34, escaped from the maximum security prison June 6, 2015 using power tools and going through a manhole. (Photo by Darren McGee/New York State Governor's Office via Getty Images)
DANNERMORA, NY - JUNE 6: In this handout from the New York State Governor's Office, shows where two convicted murderers used power tools to cut through steel pipes at the Clinton Correctional Facility June 6, 2014 in Dannemora, New York. Richard Matt, 48, and David Sweat, 34, escaped from the maximum security prison June 6, 2015 using power tools and going through a manhole. (Photo by Darren McGee/New York State Governor's Office via Getty Images)
DANNERMORA, NY - JUNE 6: In this handout from the New York State Governor's Office, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (R) is shown the manhole where two convicted murderers escaped from the Clinton Correctional Facility June 6, 2014 in Dannemora, New York. Police are on a manhunt for Richard Matt, 48, and David Sweat, 34, who escaped from the maximum security prison June 6, 2015 using power tools and going through a manhole. (Photo by Darren McGee/New York State Governor's Office via Getty Images)
A guard house stands above the wall of the Clinton Correctional Facility, Monday, June 15, 2015, in Dannemora, N.Y. State police say more than 800 law enforcement officers are pushing on in the hunt for convicted murderers David Sweat and Richard Matt 10 days after the two escaped from the maximum-security prison in rural New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
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3. Today is the anniversary of Michael Jackson's death. Fans are taking to Twitter to honor the King of Pop. Read more here.

Click through the gallery to relive some of Jackson's greatest moments:
45 PHOTOS
Michael Jackson (Through the Years)
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What to know this morning: In 5 minutes or less
FILE - In this Aug. 29, 1993 file photo, pop singer Michael Jackson performs during his "Dangerous" concert in National Stadium, Singapore. (AP Photo/C.F. Tham, file)
CIRCA 1969: R&B quintet 'Jackson 5' pose for a portrait in circa 1969. Clockwise from bottom left: Michael Jackson, Tito Jackson, Jackie Jackson, Jermaine Jackson, Marlon Jackson. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
The Jackson 5 perform during the "Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour" in Los Angeles, Calif., Sept. 15, 1972. The brothers, from left to right, are, Tito; Marlon; lead singer Michael, the youngest; Jackie; and Jermaine. (AP Photo)
American singer Michael Jackson poses at a hotel while on tour with Jackson 5, London, England, November 1972. (Photo by Express Newspapers/Getty Images)
American pop singer Michael Jackson attends the opening of the stage musical 'Dream Girls,' In Los Angeles, 1983. (Photo by Frank Edwards/Fotos International/Getty Images)
Michael Jackson is flanked by brothers Tito, left, and Marlon, right, as the Victory tour of the Jackson’s opens at Rich Stadium near Buffalo, New York Saturday, August 25, 1984. (AP Photo/Rob McElroy)
Pop artist Michael Jackson, center, is shown onstage at opening night of his Victory Tour at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, Calif., December 1, 1984. (AP Photo/Lennox McLendon)
Undated picture of US pop singer Michael Jackson. Michael Jackson died on June 25, 2009 after suffering a cardiac arrest, sending shockwaves sweeping across the world and tributes pouring in on June 26 for the tortured music icon revered as the 'King of Pop.' AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read /AFP/GettyImages)
(FILES) US pop star and entertainer Michael Jackson (R) and actress Brooke Shields arrive at the shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles where Jackson is expected to run away with a major part of the Grammy awards on Febuary 28, 1984. Michael Jackson died on June 25, 2009 after suffering a cardiac arrest, sending shockwaves sweeping across the world and tributes pouring in on June 26 for the tortured music icon revered as the 'King of Pop.' AFP PHOTO/Alan ZANGER (Photo credit should read BERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images)
FILE - In this July 7, 1984 file photo, Michael Jackson wears a white glove during his performance kicking off the "Victory Tour" at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Mo. Jackson, 50, died in Los Angeles on Thursday, June 25, 2009. (AP Photo/Cliff Schiappa, file)
FILE - In a Tuesday, Feb. 25, 1986 file photo, Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie receive a Grammy for best song of the year for their song "We Are the World" at the 28th annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. Richie, a longtime friend to Michael Jackson, says the country is in need of some healing after the pop star's recent death and the Essence Music Festival in New Orleans is going to provide the perfect remedy. Essence, which begins Friday, July 3, 2009 and runs through Sunday, will feature performances by Richie, Beyonce, John Legend, Ne-Yo, Anita Baker and a host of other artists. Organizers are now also planning a special tribute to Jackson. (AP Photo/Lennox McLendon, File)
From left to right: singer Lionel Richie, Sheila E., actress Elizabeth Taylor, singer Michael Jackson and Diana Ross sing "We are the World" at the close of the American Music Awards on Monday, Jan. 28, 1986 in Los Angeles, United States. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
American singer Michael Jackson (1958 - 2009) performing on stage, circa 1987. (Photo by Dave Hogan/Getty Images)
American singer Michael Jackson performing, 1987. (Photo by Dave Hogan/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Michael Jackson leans, points and sings, dances and struts during the opening performance of his 13-city U.S. tour, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 1988, in Kansas City. (AP Photo/Cliff Schiappa)
FILE - In this Nov. 13, 1988 file photo, pop singer Michael Jackson performs before a sold out crowd for his Bad tour at the Los Angeles Sports Arena. Jackson, 50, died in Los Angeles on Thursday, June 25, 2009. (AP Photo/Alan Greth, file)
Michael Jackson opens the first of a threee-night concert stay promoting his album "Bad", in Rosemont, Illinois, Tuesday night, April 19, 1988. Jackson will be touring the U.S. and Europe for the next three months. (AP Photo/Mark Elias)
LANDOVER, UNITED STATES: American pop music star Michael Jackson sings 13 October 1988 at the Capital Center in Landover, Maryland. AFP PHOTO/Luke FRAZZA (Photo credit should read LUKE FRAZZA/AFP/Getty Images)
(FILES) US pop star and entertainer Michael Jackson performs during the opening concert of the Asian leg of his 'Dangerous' world tour in National Stadium in Bangkok on August 24, 1993. Michael Jackson died on June 25, 2009 after suffering a cardiac arrest, sending shockwaves sweeping across the world and tributes pouring in on June 26 for the tortured music icon revered as the 'King of Pop.' AFP PHOTO/Pongsak CHAIYANUWONG (Photo credit should read PONGSAK CHAIYANUWONG/AFP/Getty Images)
FILE - In this Jan. 25, 1993 file photo, Pop singer Michael Jackson, right, holds his award while posing with actress Elizabeth Taylor at the 20th American Music Awards held at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark Terrill, file)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 7: Singer Michael Jackson (R) and guitarist Slash of 'Guns and Roses' perform the opening number at the 1995 MTV Video Music Awards 07 September held at the Radio City Music Hall in New York. Jackson and sister Janet Jackson have been nominted for 11 awards for their video 'Scream.' AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
US pop star and entertainer Michael Jackson performs during a concert at Vincennes hypodrome on September 13, 1992. Michael Jackson died on June 25, 2009 after suffering a cardiac arrest, sending shockwaves sweeping across the world and tributes pouring in on June 26 for the tortured music icon revered as the 'King of Pop.' AFP PHOTO/Bertrand GUAY (Photo credit should read BERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images)
(FILES) US pop star Michael Jackson waves to photographers during a press conference in Paris on March 19, 1996. Michael Jackson died on June 25, 2009 after suffering a cardiac arrest, sending shockwaves sweeping across the world and tributes pouring in for the tortured music icon revered as the 'King of Pop.' AFP PHOTO / VINCENT AMALVY (Photo credit should read VINCENT AMALVY/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 7: Michael Jackson (C) performs at Madison Square Garden in New York 07 September, 2001. It was the first of two performances in New York as part of his '30th Anniversary Celebration, the Solo Years.' AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read BETH A. KEISER/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES: (FILES) This 06 July, 2002, file photo shows pop singer Michael Jackson (L) waving from his limo to fans in the Harlem neighborhood of New York. The child molestation trial against Jackson is scheduled to start 31 January, 2005, in Santa Maria, California. The star has denied 10 charges, including child molestation, plying a child with alcohol to seduce him and of conspiring to kidnap and falsely imprison a child and his family at his Neverland Ranch. He is free on a three million USD bail. AFP PHOTO/Doug KANTER/FILES (Photo credit should read DOUG KANTER/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, UNITED STATES: US pop singer Michael Jackson salutes the audience after recieving the Artist of the Century Award during the 29th Annual American Music Awards at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles 09 January 2002. AFP PHOTO/Hector MATA (Photo credit should read HECTOR MATA/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES: US singer Michael Jackson and guitarist Dave Navaro perform during the Democratic National Committee (DNC) benefit concert, 'A Night at the Apollo', at the world-famous Apollo Theater 24 April 2002 in New York. The concert was to kick off a nationwide voter registration drive. AFP PHOTO/TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
404248 10: Musician Michael Jackson performs at the taping of 'American Bandstands 50th...A Celebration' television special honoring the music show April 20, 2002 in Pasadena, CA. (Photo by Vince Bucci/Getty Images)
BERLIN - NOVEMBER 19: Singer Michael Jackson holds his son eight-month-old son Prince Michael II over the balcony of the Adlon Hotel November 19, 2002 in Berlin, Germany. Jackson is in Berlin with his three children to accept a lifetime achievement award. (Photo by Olaf Selchow/Getty Images)
BERLIN - NOVEMBER 19: Singer Michael Jackson appears at the balcony of the Adlon Hotel with an unidentified child November 19, 2002 in Berlin, Germany. Jackson is in Berlin with his three children to accept a lifetime achievement award. (Photo by Olaf Selchow/Getty Images)
SOWETO, SOUTH AFRICA - JULY 18: US musician Michael Jackson holds a child 18 July in Soweto, South Africa, where he laid a wreath at the memorial for students who died in an uprising on 16 June. Jackson sang a happy birthday song to South African President Nelson Mandela at a surprise meeting with the president shortly after he arrived in the country. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read WALTER DHLADHLA/AFP/Getty Images)
SANTA MARIA, UNITED STATES: (FILES) This 13 November, 2002, file photo shows pop singer Michael Jackson arriving inside the Santa Maria Superior Court for a trial in which he is accused of canceling concert appearances and costing the promoter several million dollars. The child molestation trial against Jackson is scheduled to start 31 January, 2005, in Santa Maria, California. The star has denied 10 charges, including child molestation, plying a child with alcohol to seduce him and of conspiring to kidnap and falsely imprison a child and his family at his Neverland Ranch. He is free on a three million USD bail. POOL/SPENCER WEINER/FILES (Photo credit should read SPENCER WEINER/AFP/Getty Images)
SANTA MARIA, CA - NOVEMBER 14: Musician Michael Jackson signs autographs for fans as he arrives at his civil trial in Santa Maria Superior Court November 14, 2002 in Santa Maria, California. The artist is being sued for $21 million by his longtime promoter for backing out of two concerts. (Photo by Bryan Chan-Pool/Getty Images)
SANTA MARIA, CA - NOVEMBER 15: Pop star Michael Jackson testifies during his civil trial in Santa Maria Superior Court on November 15, 2002 in Santa Maria, California. The pop star is being sued for $21 million by his longtime promoter for backing out of two concerts. (Photo by Ed Souza-Pool/Getty Images)
SANTA MARIA, CA - DECEMBER 4: Singer Michael Jackson testifies during the morning session of his civil trial in Santa Maria Superior Court on December 4, 2002 in Santa Maria, California. The artist is being sued for $21 million by his longtime promoter for backing out of two concerts. (Photo by Jim Ruyman-Pool/Getty Images)
Michael Jackson performs at a Democratic National Committee fundraiser at the Apollo Theatre in New York, Wednesday, April 24, 2002. The fundraiser is a kickoff for the party's nationwide voter registration drive. Behind Jackson, actors playing the parts of an Arab and Jew embrace. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
FILE - In this Tuesday, June 24, 2003 file picture, Michael Jackson, left, performs with James Brown during the BET Awards in Los Angeles. Jackson later presented Brown with a lifetime achievement award. Jackson has died in Los Angeles at age 50 on Thursday, June 25, 2009. (AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian)
LAS VEGAS - OCTOBER 27: (TABLOIDS OUT) Singer Beyonce' Knowles and singer Michael Jackson, winner of the 2003 Humanitarian Award, hug onstage at The 2003 Radio Music Awards at the Aladdin Casino Resort October 27, 2003 in Las Vegas, Neveda. For more information on Jackson's humanitarian efforts, go to musicforgiving.org. (Photos by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)
SANTA MARIA, CA - APRIL 30: Singer Michael Jackson gestures while departing the courthouse after his arraignment on April 30, 2004 in Santa Maria, California. Jackson plead not guilty to the grand jury indictment of numerous child molestation charges. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
Pop star Michael Jackson leaves Santa Barbara County Superior Court in Santa Maria, Calif., Thursday April 7, 2005, after another day of testimony in his child molestation trial. A former security guard at Michael Jackson's Neverland ranch told a lurid story Thursday about seeing the singer kiss, fondle and perform oral sex on a boy who later received a financial settlement from the pop star. (AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian)
Michael Jackson performs at the World Music Awards at Earls Court Arena in London, Wednesday Nov. 15, 2006. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
Michael Jackson waves in Tokyo in this Sunday, May 28, 2006 file photo. Jackson is "reviewing and evaluating" proposals for his future including several offers to perform in Las Vegas, his spokeswoman said Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2007, but he doesn't feel any pressure to make a quick decision. Raymone K. Bain confirmed that, after a period of globe-trotting, Jackson is currently living in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, file)
US singer Michael Jackson announces that he is set to play ten live concerts at the London O2 Arena in July, at the venue itself in south London, Thursday, March 5, 2009. (AP Photo/Joel Ryan)
FILE - In this March 30, 2005 file photo, Michael Jackson exits a courtroom in Santa Maria, Calif. The estate of Michael Jackson has landed the late King of Pop the biggest recording deal in history: a $200 million guaranteed contract with Sony Music Entertainment for 10 projects over seven years, according to a person familiar with the deal. (AP Photos/Hector Mata, pool, File)
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4. Investigators are blaming IRS employees for mistakenly losing thousands of emails related to the tax agency's tea party scandal. Read more here.

Photos of the key players in the investigation:
15 PHOTOS
IRS email probe
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What to know this morning: In 5 minutes or less
Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., grills Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen as he testifies before the House Oversight Committee as lawmakers continue their probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the IRS, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, June 23, 2014. The IRS asserts it can't produce emails from seven officials connected to the tea party investigation because of computer crashes, including the emails from Lois Lerner, the former IRS official at the center of the investigation. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Lois Lerner emails obtained from the House Ways and Means Committee are displayed in Washington, Wednesday, July 30, 2014. A former IRS official at the heart of the agency's tea party controversial called Republicans "crazies" and more in newly released emails. Lois Lerner used to head the IRS division that handles applications for tax-exempt status. In a series of emails with a colleague in November 2012, Lerner made two disparaging remarks about members of the GOP, including one remark that was profane. Republican Rep. Dave Camp, who chairs the House Ways and Means Committee, released the emails Wednesday as part of his committee's investigation. Camp says the emails show Lerner's disgust with conservatives. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
FILE - In this March 5, 2014, file photo, former Internal Revenue Service (IRS) official Lois Lerner speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Justice Department is investigating the circumstances behind the disappearance of emails from Lerner, part of a broader criminal inquiry into whether the agency had targeted conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status, according to congressional testimony released Wednesday. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)
Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen testifies before the House Oversight Committee as lawmakers continue their probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the IRS, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, June 23, 2014. The IRS asserts it can't produce emails from several officials connected to the tea party investigation because of computer crashes, including the emails from Lois Lerner, the former IRS official at the center of the investigation. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen testifies under subpoena before the House Oversight Committee as lawmakers continue their probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the IRS, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, June 23, 2014. The IRS asserts it can't produce emails from several officials connected to the tea party investigation because of computer crashes, including the emails from Lois Lerner, the former IRS official at the center of the investigation. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., chairman of the House Oversight Committee, joined at left by Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., the ranking member, leads the questioning of Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen as lawmakers continue their probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the IRS, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, June 23, 2014. The IRS asserts it can't produce emails from seven officials connected to the tea party investigation because of computer crashes, including the emails from Lois Lerner, the former IRS official at the center of the investigation. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen is sworn in before the House Oversight Committee as lawmakers continue their probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the IRS, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, June 23, 2014. The IRS asserts it can't produce emails from seven officials connected to the tea party investigation because of computer crashes, including the emails from Lois Lerner, the former IRS official at the center of the investigation. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, grills Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen as the House Oversight Committee continues its probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the IRS, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, June 23, 2014. The IRS asserts it can't produce emails from seven officials connected to the tea party investigation because of computer crashes, including the emails from Lois Lerner, the former IRS official at the center of the investigation. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Rep. Lynn Jenkins, R-Kansas, accompanied by House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, left, and Rep. Todd Young, R-Ind, attacks the excuse given by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) that it has lost more emails connected to a tea party investigation, Wednesday, June 18, 2014, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
FILE - This March 5, 2014 file photo shows former Internal Revenue Service (IRS) official Lois Lerner speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. A federal judge is ordering the IRS to explain _ under oath _ how it lost a trove of emails to and from a central figure in the agency's tea party controversy. U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan gave the tax agency a month to submit the explanation in writing. Sullivan issued the order Thursday as part of a freedom of information lawsuit by Judicial Watch, a conservative watchdog group. The IRS says it lost the emails in 2011 when Lois Lerner’s computer crashed. At the time, Lerner headed the IRS division that processes applications for tax-exempt status. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)
House Oversight Committee member Rep. John Mica, R-Fla. waves a copy of an emailed document addressed to IRS official Lois Lerner as he joined with committee Chairman Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., in demanding that Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen provide all of Lerner’s emails as the panel’s GOP majority continues the probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the IRS, Wednesday, March 26, 2014, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Rep. Charles Boustany, R-La., chairman of the Ways and Means Oversight Subcommittee, drills Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen as the full committee continues its probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the IRS, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, June 20, 2014. Listening at left is Rep. Peter Roskam, R-Ill. The IRS asserts it can't produce emails from seven officials connected to the tea party investigation because of computer crashes, including the emails from Lois Lerner, the former IRS official at the center of the investigation who has invoked her Fifth Amendment right at least nine times to avoid answering lawmakers' questions. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen talks to reporters during a break in his appearance before the House Ways and Means Committee on their continuing probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the IRS, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, June 20, 2014. The IRS asserts it can't produce emails from seven officials connected to the tea party investigation because of computer crashes, including the emails from Lois Lerner, the former IRS official at the center of the investigation who has invoked her Fifth Amendment right at least nine times to avoid answering lawmakers' questions. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Rep. Charles Boustany, R-La., chairman of the Ways and Means Oversight Subcommittee, listens as Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen tesifies to the full committee in its probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the IRS, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, June 20, 2014. Listening at left is Rep. Peter Roskam, R-Ill. The IRS asserts it can't produce emails from seven officials connected to the tea party investigation because of computer crashes, including the emails from Lois Lerner, the former IRS official at the center of the investigation who has invoked her Fifth Amendment right at least nine times to avoid answering lawmakers' questions. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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5. A week after nine members were fatally shot at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, in Charleston, South Carolina, parishioners are resuming Bible study. Read more here.

Photos of the first church service since the shootings:
24 PHOTOS
First service in Charleston church since shootings
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What to know this morning: In 5 minutes or less
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Jimmy Guyton participates at the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by Paul Zoeller-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Parishioners cry and embrace as they attend the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: People kneel during a prayer at the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by Paul Zoeller-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Juliett Marsh, of Washington, D.C., listens from the balcony at the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by Paul Zoeller-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: The Rev. Norvel Goff speaks at the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by Paul Zoeller-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Parishioners pray as they attend the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Parishioners cry and embrace as they attend the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: The Rev. Norvel Goff speaks at the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
Ushers come to the assistance of a woman who collapses as she prays at the Emanuel A.M.E. Church Sunday, June 21, 2015, in Charleston, S.C., four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of it's pastor and eight others. (AP Photo/David Goldman, Pool)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Parishioners pray as they attend the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Parishioners Shakur Francis, left, and Karen Watson-Fleming sing as they attend the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Parishioners sing four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of Pinckney and eight others at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: An organist plays music as parishioners take their seats at the Emanuel A.M.E. Church four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of it's pastor and eight others at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Church member Kevin Polite, right, helps members into the church four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of it's pastor and eight others at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: The Rev. Norvel Goff, right, prays at the empty seat of the Rev. Clementa Pinckney at the Emanuel A.M.E. Church four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of Pinckney and eight others at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
A bicyclist rides in front of the Emanuel AME Church, Sunday, June 21, 2015, before the first worship service since nine people were fatally shot at the church during a Bible study group, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
A palm rose with a message from Orlando, Fla. is placed near the front of the Emanuel AME Church Sunday, June 21, 2015, before the first worship service since nine people were fatally shot at the church during a Bible study group, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
Raymond Smith of Charleston kneels in prayer at the front of the Emanuel AME Church before Sunday, June 21, 2015, before the first worship service since nine people were fatally shot at the church during a Bible study group, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
Charleston County Sheriffs Deputy C. E. Hall III checks the purse of an elderly woman before she enters the Emanuel AME Church for a worship service, Sunday, June 21, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. Members of the church are returning to their sanctuary today to worship, marking the reopening to the public following a deadly shooting during a Bible study session. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
A media satellite dish points to the sky in front of the Emanuel AME Church Sunday, June 21, 2015, before the first worship service since nine people were fatally shot at the church during a Bible study group, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
Gillettie Bennett, right, comforts Clarissa Jackson, left, Sunday, June 21, 2015, while she waits in line for Emanuel AME Church's first worship service since nine people were fatally shot at the church during a Bible study group, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
Raymond Smith of Charleston uses incense to spiritually cleanse the front of the Emanuel AME Church Sunday, June 21, 2015, before the first worship service since nine people were fatally shot at the church during a Bible study group, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: People pay respects outside at the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by Paul Zoeller-Pool/Getty Images)
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