More than 100 new marine species were just discovered

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...

Why It Matters to Keep the World's Oceans Pure and Clean


Keeping the world's oceans pure and clean is critical, especially because you never know how many inhabitants each ocean truly has. A recent expedition led divers deep into "Twilight Zone" of The Coral Triangle which can be found 150 to 500 feet under water in the western Pacific Ocean.

More specifically, The Coral Triangle includes the waters of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Timor Leste and Solomon Islands. While the more shallow parts of the ocean can be easily discovered, the depths of the water are harder to get to, and therefore, they are seldom explored in detail.

Steven Bedard, the senior science editor at The California Academy of sciences said:

"More people have walked on the surface of the moon, than have visited the Twilight Zone."


The skilled divers used very specific and special equipment, called "rebreathers" for this exploration. Their equipment works by recycling their breath through a process that filters out unused oxygen from the carbon dioxide in their exhalations. This equipment allowed them to spend up to 30 minutes in the depths of the ocean. In addition to the "rebreathers", the team of divers also used decompression chambers in an effort to help the marine life survived while they were being transitioned from the deep ocean to the surface.

The Coral Triangle has been known to nurture several types of marine animal populations, some of which you're probably familiar with, like tuna and sea turtles.

20 PHOTOS
The Coral Triangle, diverse marine life
See Gallery
More than 100 new marine species were just discovered
Reef fish swim among the coral in Kimbe Bay off Papua New Guinea’s New Britain Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2007. Kimbe Bay lies in the “Coral Triangle” heartland of the world’s reef-building coral, in seas surrounded by Indonesia, the Philippines and the Solomon Islands. With hundreds of species of coral and reef fish, the 9,800-square-kilometer (3,300 square mile) bay is one of the world’s most diverse marine environments. (AP Photo/David Longstreath)
Map shows the biologically diverse area of the Coral Triangle around Indonesia; includes selection of at risk coral; 2c x 3 inches; 96.3 mm x 76.2 mm
A blue starfish is seen on coral in Kimbe Bay off Papua New Guinea’s New Britain Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2007. Kimbe Bay lies in the “Coral Triangle” heartland of the world’s reef-building coral, in seas surrounded by Indonesia, the Philippines and the Solomon Islands. With hundreds of species of coral and reef fish, the 9,800-square-kilometer (3,300 square mile) bay is one of the world’s most diverse marine environments. (AP Photo/David Longstreath)
Annisah Sapul with the Nature Conservancy snorkels in Kimbe Bay, off Papua New Guinea’s New Britain Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2007. Kimbe Bay lies in the “Coral Triangle” heartland of the world’s reef-building coral, in seas surrounded by Indonesia, the Philippines and the Solomon Islands. With hundreds of species of coral and reef fish, the 9,800-square-kilometer (3,300 square mile) bay is one of the world’s most diverse marine environments. (AP Photo/David Longstreath)
Reef fish swim among the coral in Kimbe Bay off Papua New Guinea’s New Britain Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2007. Kimbe Bay lies in the “Coral Triangle” heartland of the world’s reef-building coral, in seas surrounded by Indonesia, the Philippines and the Solomon Islands. With hundreds of species of coral and reef fish, the 9,800-square-kilometer (3,300 square mile) bay is one of the world’s most diverse marine environments. (AP Photo/David Longstreath)
Reef fish swim among the coral in Kimbe Bay off Papua New Guinea’s New Britain Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2007. Kimbe Bay lies in the “Coral Triangle” heartland of the world’s reef-building coral, in seas surrounded by Indonesia, the Philippines and the Solomon Islands. With hundreds of species of coral and reef fish, the 9,800-square-kilometer (3,300 square mile) bay is one of the world’s most diverse marine environments. (AP Photo/David Longstreath)
In this photograph taken December 2, 2010, a colourful variety of coral at Pink Beach off Komodo island. The marine ecosystem of Komodo National Park in Indonesia's East Nusa Tenggara province has more than 1,000 fish species and 250 varieties of reef-building corals thriving in the the current-swept sea bed and open water surrounding nature reserve. Indonesia is a vast archipelago of 17,000 island located in the marine rich Coral Triangle. AFP PHOTO / ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)
In this photograph taken December 2, 2010, a colourful variety of coral growing at Pink Beach off Komodo island. The marine ecosystem of Komodo National Park in Indonesia's East Nusa Tenggara province has more than 1,000 fish species and 250 varieties of reef-building corals thriving in the the current-swept sea bed and open water surrounding nature reserve. Indonesia is a vast archipelago of 17,000 island located in the marine rich Coral Triangle. AFP PHOTO / ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)
In this photograph taken December 2, 2010, a colourful variety of coral growing at Pink Beach off Komodo island. The marine ecosystem of Komodo National Park in Indonesia's East Nusa Tenggara province has more than 1,000 fish species and 250 varieties of reef-building corals thriving in the the current-swept sea bed and open water surrounding nature reserve. Indonesia is a vast archipelago of 17,000 island located in the marine rich Coral Triangle. AFP PHOTO / ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)
In this photograph taken December 2, 2010, a colourful variety of coral growing at Pink Beach off Komodo island. The marine ecosystem of Komodo National Park in Indonesia's East Nusa Tenggara province has more than 1,000 fish species and 250 varieties of reef-building corals thriving in the the current-swept sea bed and open water surrounding nature reserve. Indonesia is a vast archipelago of 17,000 island located in the marine rich Coral Triangle. AFP PHOTO / ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)
In this photograph taken December 2, 2010, a colourful variety of coral growing at Pink Beach off Komodo island. The marine ecosystem of Komodo National Park in Indonesia's East Nusa Tenggara province has more than 1,000 fish species and 250 varieties of reef-building corals thriving in the the current-swept sea bed and open water surrounding nature reserve. Indonesia is a vast archipelago of 17,000 island located in the marine rich Coral Triangle. AFP PHOTO / ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)
In this photograph taken December 2, 2010, a colourful variety of fish swims over the coral bed at Pink Beach off Komodo island. The marine ecosystem of Komodo National Park in Indonesia's East Nusa Tenggara province has more than 1,000 fish species and 250 varieties of reef-building corals thriving in the the current-swept sea bed and open water surrounding nature reserve. Indonesia is a vast archipelago of 17,000 island located in the marine rich Coral Triangle. AFP PHOTO / ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Fish swim in the coral reef of Bunaken Island national marine park in northern Sulawesi on May 14, 2009. The tiny island is a marine protected area with a flourishing coral reefs, seagrass bed and mangrove that is home to endangered species such as dugongs, sea turtles, giant clams and others. Leaders from six nations agreed on May 15, 2009 to work jointly to save Southeast Asia's massive Coral Triangle, considered the world's richest underwater wilderness. AFP PHOTO/ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Corals grow at the protected Bunaken Island marine national partk in Manado on May 14, 2006. Rising water temperatures, sea levels and acidity are threatening to destroy the vast region of southeast Asia known as Coral Triangle, labelled the ocean's answer to the Amazon rainforest, the WWF said in a new report. A meeting on May 15 will see leaders from the six Coral Triangle nations pass a joint plan on conserving the region. AFP PHOTO/ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)
(FILES) In this file photograph taken on May 14, 2009 corals and mangroves grow at Indonesia's protected Bunaken Island marine national park. More than 85 percent of reefs in Asia's 'Coral Triangle' are directly threatened by human activities such as coastal development, pollution, and overfishing, a new report warned on July 9, 2012. The Coral Triangle covers Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Solomon Islands and East Timor and contains nearly 30 percent of the world's reefs and more than 3,000 species of fish. AFP PHOTO / ROMEO GACAD / FILES (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/GettyImages)
Corals and mangrove grow at the protected Bunaken Island marine national partk in Manado on May 14, 2006. Rising water temperatures, sea levels and acidity are threatening to destroy the vast region of southeast Asia known as Coral Triangle, labelled the ocean's answer to the Amazon rainforest, the WWF said in a new report. A meeting on May 15 will see leaders from the six Coral Triangle nations pass a joint plan on conserving the region. AFP PHOTO/ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Corals grow at the protected Bunaken Island marine national park in Manado on May 13, 2009. The capital city of the northern Indonesian Sulawesi province, Manado is currently hosting the World Ocean Conference. Rising water temperatures, sea levels and acidity are threatening to destroy the vast region of south-east Asia known as the Coral Triangle, labelled the ocean's answer to the Amazon rainforest, the WWF said in a new report. A meeting on May 15 will see leaders from the six Coral Triangle nations pass a joint plan on conserving the region AFP PHOTO/ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Mangroves and coral reef grow off Bunaken Island national marine park in northern Sulawesi on May 14, 2009. The tiny island is a marine protected area with a flourishing coral reefs, seagrass bed and mangrove that is home to endangered species such as dugongs, sea turtles, giant clams and others. Leaders from six nations agreed on May 15, 2009 to work jointly to save Southeast Asia's massive Coral Triangle, considered the world's richest underwater wilderness. AFP PHOTO/ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Fish swim in the coral reef of Bunaken Island national marine park in northern Sulawesi on May 14, 2009. The tiny island is a marine protected area with a flourishing coral reefs, seagrass bed and mangrove that is home to endangered species such as dugongs, sea turtles, giant clams and others. Leaders from six nations agreed on May 15, 2009 to work jointly to save Southeast Asia's massive Coral Triangle, considered the world's richest underwater wilderness. AFP PHOTO/ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


In the recent expedition, the team of divers found several species, including sea slugs, barnacles, urchins, and 15 live fish. Along with the discovery of new species, the researchers also came across the first-ever living examples of animals who had previously only been known to exist through their skeletons.

In the midst of the exploration, researchers discovered the first-ever living examples of animals whose existence had been known only through skeletons.

Some of the creatures that were discovered will be on view at an exhibition scheduled to open next year at The California Academy of Sciences.

More on AOL.com:
Lawmakers take steps to remove Confederate flag
Massachusetts honors homeless high schoolers
Don Lemon sparks outrage


Read Full Story

People are Reading