Save With These Shoe Hacks

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Save With These Shoe Hacks
Do you have a pair of shoes that just don't seem to fit the way you want them to? Well, before you throw them away and buy a new pair, here are some tips to help you save your shoes, and your wallet.

For leather shoes you just can't seem to break in, try stretching them out with these simple steps. Pour a mixture of half water and half rubbing alcohol into a spray bottle. Then, dampen the inside of the shoe, focusing on the spots that feel tight. After that, put on a couple pairs of socks and wear the shoes around the house for a few hours. The alcohol will cause the leather to stretch and conform to the shape of your foot.

When it comes to breaking in other types of shoes, here's a solution that only takes a few minutes. Start by putting on a couple pairs of socks and then slip your shoes on. Next, aim a hairdryer on the tight sections for a few seconds. To maximize the stretching, wiggle your feet at the same time. After they cool off, take off the extra socks and test them out. By this point, your shoes should feel much more comfortable.

Finally, did you know that the time of day affects the size of your feet? It's true. Your feet can swell up to half a size bigger as they day goes on, so try to shop for shoes in the afternoon or evening. You'll get a much more accurate measurement, which means a better fit for your feet.

Remember these tips to save your uncomfortable shoes from getting tossed away. You'll see that you with a few easy steps you can hold onto your shoes, and your money.

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