'Antiques Roadshow:' Lincoln campaign print gets a big price

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'Antiques Roadshow:' Lincoln Campaign Print Gets a Big Price


A Sacramento woman shared a unique piece of political history on "Antiques Roadshow" that had the appraiser gushing.

"Lincoln is extremely popular. Campaign prints are very popular. The size, the drama of the picture. It's wonderful," said Christopher W. Lane on "AntiquesRoadshow."

The reason he's so giddy? That woman brought in an impeccably well-preserved poster from Abraham Lincoln's campaign for reelection in 1864.

Though the country was still embroiled in the Civil War, Lincoln had to stump for votes. It just goes to show that, even back then, politicians were constantly on the campaign trail.

Back in the '80s, the owner's husband de-acidified the paper, lined the edges and filled in some of the missing paint to make it pop like the day it was printed.

Thanks to the restoration work, the appraiser valued it at $25,000 when the episode first ran in the year 2000.

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Let's hope she held on to the poster, because the updated estimation has the poster at $40,000.

Although it was meticulously preserved, the poster's original coloring was done hastily. This led to a unique imperfection that made it much more valuable.

"If you look right here at her helmet, you can see that the yellow is a little low. So that the stars, the gaps where the stars are are below that. Yet the red at the top is a little high," said Lane.

The owner's husband received the poster from a friend, whose grandmother claimed to have ripped the print from the side of a barn during the campaign.

I guess the one poster didn't hurt his presidential bid. As you're probably aware, Lincoln won the election and proved crucial in the ending of the Civil War before his assassination in 1865.

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