General Mills to drop artificial ingredients from cereals

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NEW YORK (AP) — General Mills is dropping artificial colors and flavors from its cereals, the latest company to respond to a growing desire for food made with ingredients people see as natural.

The company said Monday that Trix and Reese's Puffs will be among the first cereals to undergo the changes. The Minneapolis company says cereals like Lucky Charms that have marshmallows may take longer to reformulate. It says 90 percent of its cereals will have no artificial ingredients by the end of 2016.

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General Mills to drop artificial ingredients from cereals
MIAMI BEACH, FL - FEBRUARY 22: General Mills on display at Best Of The Munchies: People's Choice Food Awards hosted by Andrew Zimmern during the 2015 Food Network & Cooking Channel South Beach Wine & Food Festival presented by FOOD & WINE at Beachside at The Ritz Carlton on February 22, 2015 in Miami Beach, Florida. (Photo by Sergi Alexander/Getty Images for SOBEWFF)
MIAMI BEACH, FL - FEBRUARY 22: General Mills on display at Best Of The Munchies: People's Choice Food Awards hosted by Andrew Zimmern during the 2015 Food Network & Cooking Channel South Beach Wine & Food Festival presented by FOOD & WINE at Beachside at The Ritz Carlton on February 22, 2015 in Miami Beach, Florida. (Photo by Sergi Alexander/Getty Images for SOBEWFF)
MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 23: General Mills cereal products are displayed on a store shelf on September 23, 2014 in Miami, Florida. During a share holders meeting tomorrow, General Mills investors are being given the opportunity to vote on whether the company should remove genetically modified organisms from its products. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI BEACH, FL - FEBRUARY 22: General Mills on display at Best Of The Munchies: People's Choice Food Awards hosted by Andrew Zimmern during the 2015 Food Network & Cooking Channel South Beach Wine & Food Festival presented by FOOD & WINE at Beachside at The Ritz Carlton on February 22, 2015 in Miami Beach, Florida. (Photo by Sergi Alexander/Getty Images for SOBEWFF)
MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 23: In this photo illustration, the General Mills cereal Lucky Charms is seen on September 23, 2014 in Miami, Florida. During a share holders meeting tomorrow, General Mills investors are being given the opportunity to vote on whether the company should remove genetically modified organisms from its products. (Photo Illustration by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 23: In this photo illustration, General Mills cereal products are seen on September 23, 2014 in Miami, Florida. During a share holders meeting tomorrow, General Mills investors are being given the opportunity to vote on whether the company should remove genetically modified organisms from its products. (Photo Illustration by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 23: General Mills cereal products are displayed on a store shelf on September 23, 2014 in Miami, Florida. During a share holders meeting tomorrow, General Mills investors are being given the opportunity to vote on whether the company should remove genetically modified organisms from its products. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 23: In this photo illustration, the General Mills cereal Honey Nut Cheerios is seen on September 23, 2014 in Miami, Florida. During a share holders meeting tomorrow, General Mills investors are being given the opportunity to vote on whether the company should remove genetically modified organisms from its products. (Photo Illustration by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 23: General Mills cereal products are displayed on a store shelf on September 23, 2014 in Miami, Florida. During a share holders meeting tomorrow, General Mills investors are being given the opportunity to vote on whether the company should remove genetically modified organisms from its products. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 23: General Mills cereal products are displayed on a store shelf on September 23, 2014 in Miami, Florida. During a share holders meeting tomorrow, General Mills investors are being given the opportunity to vote on whether the company should remove genetically modified organisms from its products. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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A range of food companies including Subway, Pizza Hut, Panera, Hershey and Nestle have said in recent months that they're removing artificial ingredients from some or all products. Companies say the changes are a response to a demand for food made with ingredients people can recognize.

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