Emotion-reading robot 'Pepper' sells out in a single minute

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Emotion-Reading Robot 'Pepper' Sells Out In A Single Minute

SoftBank's robot Pepper isn't designed to do any heavy lifting or household chores, but it does promise to be a constant source of companionship and emotional support.

It appears that's just fine by consumers, as the tech-enabled best friend sold out within a minute of its release.

The initial one thousand robots made available for purchase were priced at roughly 16 hundred dollars each.

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Emotion-reading robot 'Pepper' sells out in a single minute
Softbank Corp.'s Pepper robot performs during a press conference in Maihama, near Tokyo, Thursday, June 18, 2015. Technology company Softbank's Pepper robot is going on sale in Japan on Saturday, equipped with a "heart" designed to not only recognize human emotions but react with simulations of anger, joy and irritation. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
Softbank Corp. CEO Masayoshi Son attends a press conference on its Pepper robot in Maihama, near Tokyo, Thursday, June 18, 2015. Technology company Softbank's Pepper robot is going on sale in Japan on Saturday, equipped with a "heart" designed to not only recognize human emotions but react with simulations of anger, joy and irritation. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
SoftBank Corp's CEO Masayoshi Son greets pepper, the company's robot, during a press conference in Maihama, near Tokyo, Thursday, June 18, 2015. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
SoftBank Corp's CEO Masayoshi Son speaks with the company's robot Pepper during a press conference in Maihama, near Tokyo, Thursday, June 18, 2015. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
Softbank Corp. CEO Masayoshi Son, center, Alibaba Group Executive Chairman Jack Ma, left, of China and Foxconn Chairman and CEO Terry Gou of Taiwan pose for photographers with Softbank's Pepper robot during a press conference in Maihama, near Tokyo, Thursday, June 18, 2015. Son said the company was preparing for a global sales launch with partners Alibaba Group and FoxConn. They will each take a 20 percent stake in Softbank's robotics unit, and help with software and manufacturing. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
SoftBank Corp's robot Pepper performs during a press conference in Maihama, near Tokyo, Thursday, June 18, 2015. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
Humanoid Robot "Pepper" is displayed at SoftBank Mobile shop in Tokyo, Friday, June 6, 2014. The 121 centimeter (48 inch) tall, 28 kilogram (62 pound) white Pepper, which has no hair but two large doll-like eyes and a flat-panel display stuck on its chest, was developed jointly with Aldebaran Robotics, which produces autonomous humanoid robots. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
Humanoid Robot "Pepper" is displayed at SoftBank Mobile shop in Tokyo, Friday, June 6, 2014. The 121 centimeter (48 inch) tall, 28 kilogram (62 pound) white Pepper, which has no hair but two large doll-like eyes and a flat-panel display stuck on its chest, was developed jointly with Aldebaran Robotics, which produces autonomous humanoid robots. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
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There's also an additional monthly insurance and data fee of about 200 dollars.

What buyers are promised in return for their investment is a buddy who can read and interpret human emotions and do all it can to make people happy.

SoftBank does caution that Pepper may not come out of the box knowing everything about feelings or how to best deal with them.

Given time, however, they assure consumers that the robot will learn.

This ability is powered in part by a bevy of cameras and sensors, which feed Pepper information about expressions, language and its surroundings.

Also aiding in the process is access to a wisdom-filled data cloud.

Not only will Pepper become more attuned to others' personalities over time, the robot will develop one of its own.
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