Macedonia allows migrants to legitimately transit country

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Macedonia allowing migrants to travel through legally
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Macedonia allows migrants to legitimately transit country
Migrants wait for a train at a station in Demir Kapija, south-eastern Macedonia, on June 18, 2015 on their way to the Serbian border. Migrants from impoverished and war-torn countries in Africa, the Middle East and central and south Asia walk through Macedonia along the line to reach Serbia as they head north from Greece in the hope of crossing the European Union border into Romania, Hungary and Croatia. Traffickers charge half the price for the land route through the western Balkans into northern Europe, around 1,800 euros compared to 3,000 euros for the direct sea or air route, according to Frontex. AFP PHOTO / ROBERT ATANASOVSKI (Photo credit should read ROBERT ATANASOVSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A migrant woman and child wait for a train at a station in Demir Kapija, south-eastern Macedonia, on June 18, 2015 on their way to the Serbian border. Migrants from impoverished and war-torn countries in Africa, the Middle East and central and south Asia walk through Macedonia along the line to reach Serbia as they head north from Greece in the hope of crossing the European Union border into Romania, Hungary and Croatia. Traffickers charge half the price for the land route through the western Balkans into northern Europe, around 1,800 euros compared to 3,000 euros for the direct sea or air route, according to Frontex. AFP PHOTO / ROBERT ATANASOVSKI (Photo credit should read ROBERT ATANASOVSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Migrants try to board a train at a train station in Demir Kapija, south-eastern Macedonia, on June 18, 2015 on their way to the Serbian border. Migrants from impoverished and war-torn countries in Africa, the Middle East and central and south Asia walk through Macedonia along the line to reach Serbia as they head north from Greece in the hope of crossing the European Union border into Romania, Hungary and Croatia. Traffickers charge half the price for the land route through the western Balkans into northern Europe, around 1,800 euros compared to 3,000 euros for the direct sea or air route, according to Frontex. AFP PHOTO / ROBERT ATANASOVSKI (Photo credit should read ROBERT ATANASOVSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A group of migrants from Syria and Iraq rest to shelter from the rain in an underpass near Petrovec, some 20 kms (12 miles) east of Skopje, Macedonia, Wednesday, June 17, 2015. Macedonia has become one of the main transit routes for thousands of migrants from the Middle East and Africa who enter the European Union in Greece from Turkey and then make their way overland on foot or bicycle to the more prosperous northern countries. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski)
A group of migrants from Syria and Iraq ride bicycles along an express road near Petrovec, some 20 kms (12 miles) east of Skopje, Macedonia, Wednesday, June 17, 2015. Macedonia has become one of the main transit routes for thousands of migrants from the Middle East and Africa who enter the European Union in Greece from Turkey and then make their way overland on foot or bicycle to the more prosperous northern countries. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski)
A group of migrants from Syria and Iraq ride bicycles along an express road near Petrovec, some 20 kms (12 miles) east of Skopje, Macedonia, Wednesday, June 17, 2015. Macedonia has become one of the main transit routes for thousands of migrants from the Middle East and Africa who enter the European Union in Greece from Turkey and then make their way overland on foot or bicycle to the more prosperous northern countries. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski)
A young migrant rests in an underpass to shelter from the rain, near Petrovec, some 20 kms (12 miles) east of Skopje, Macedonia, Wednesday, June 17, 2015. Macedonia has become one of the main transit routes for thousands of migrants from the Middle East and Africa who enter the European Union in Greece from Turkey and then make their way overland on foot or bicycle to the more prosperous northern countries. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski)
A group of migrants from Syria and Iraq rest under an express road underpass the shelter from the rain, near Petrovec, some 20 kms (12 miles) east of Skopje, Macedonia, Wednesday, June 17, 2015. Macedonia has become one of the main transit routes for thousands of migrants from the Middle East and Africa who enter the European Union in Greece from Turkey and then make their way overland on foot or bicycle to the more prosperous northern countries. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski)
A migrant pushes a bicycle along an express road some 32 kms (20 miles) northeast of Skopje, Macedonia, Tuesday, June 16, 2015. Macedonia has become one of the main transit routes for thousands of migrants from the Middle East and Africa who enter the European Union in Greece from Turkey and then make their way overland on foot or bicycle to the more prosperous northern countries. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski)
Migrants sleep in a Macedonian mosque in Kumanovo, 10 kilometers from the Serbian border, on June 17, 2015. Migrants from impoverished and war-torn countries in Africa, the Middle East and central and south Asia walk through Macedonia along the line to reach Serbia as they head north from Greece in the hope of crossing the European Union border into Romania, Hungary and Croatia. Traffickers charge half the price for the land route through the western Balkans into northern Europe, around 1,800 euros compared to 3,000 euros for the direct sea or air route, according to Frontex. AFP PHOTO / ROBERT ATANASOVSKI (Photo credit should read ROBERT ATANASOVSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Migrants rest in a Macedonian mosque in Kumanovo, 10 kilometers from the Serbian border, on June 17, 2015. Migrants from impoverished and war-torn countries in Africa, the Middle East and central and south Asia walk through Macedonia along the line to reach Serbia as they head north from Greece in the hope of crossing the European Union border into Romania, Hungary and Croatia. Traffickers charge half the price for the land route through the western Balkans into northern Europe, around 1,800 euros compared to 3,000 euros for the direct sea or air route, according to Frontex. AFP PHOTO / ROBERT ATANASOVSKI (Photo credit should read ROBERT ATANASOVSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A migrant child waits for medical help in a Macedonian mosque in Kumanovo, 10 kilometers from the Serbian border, on June 17, 2015. Migrants from impoverished and war-torn countries in Africa, the Middle East and central and south Asia walk through Macedonia along the line to reach Serbia as they head north from Greece in the hope of crossing the European Union border into Romania, Hungary and Croatia. Traffickers charge half the price for the land route through the western Balkans into northern Europe, around 1,800 euros compared to 3,000 euros for the direct sea or air route, according to Frontex. AFP PHOTO / ROBERT ATANASOVSKI (Photo credit should read ROBERT ATANASOVSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A migrant mother and her child prepare to sleep in a Macedonian mosque in Kumanovo, 10 kilometers from the Serbian border, on June 17, 2015. Migrants from impoverished and war-torn countries in Africa, the Middle East and central and south Asia walk through Macedonia along the line to reach Serbia as they head north from Greece in the hope of crossing the European Union border into Romania, Hungary and Croatia. Traffickers charge half the price for the land route through the western Balkans into northern Europe, around 1,800 euros compared to 3,000 euros for the direct sea or air route, according to Frontex. AFP PHOTO / ROBERT ATANASOVSKI (Photo credit should read ROBERT ATANASOVSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A group of migrants push their bicycles on a highway on June 15, 2015, near the town of Veles on a way to Serbia border. Migrants are walking and crossing the seas on boats to flee their poor war-torn countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia to get to Western Europe. In Macedonia they take bicycles to get to Serbia, the last step towards salvation that they hope to find within the European Union. AFP PHOTO / ROBERT ATANASOVSKI (Photo credit should read ROBERT ATANASOVSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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SKOPJE, Macedonia (AP) -- Macedonia has changed its asylum law to let migrants entering the country illegally avoid jail if they leave within three days.

Thursday's move follows a series of fatal accidents involving migrants traveling through Macedonia on the way to more prosperous European countries, following dangerous routes to avoid police arrest.

Macedonia has become a major transit route for thousands of Middle Eastern and African refugees and migrants who cross over from Greece. At least 25 have been killed by trains since January as they walked on railway tracks. Many others are robbed by criminal gangs.

The new law effective next week allows migrants to apply for temporary asylum at the border or the nearest police station. That will allow them to travel legally through the country for three days.

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