Over 60,000 bees found in Ogden, Utah, apartment complex

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More Than 60,000 Bees Found Inside Utah Apartment Complex


OGDEN, Utah – An Ogden apartment complex was found with over 60,000 bees in its walls.

Conna Mikesell, a resident of the Lake Park Apartments, said she noticed the bees when she first moved in over a year ago.

"It is just extremely amazing that these honey bees have built these huge honeycombs under the shingles. It's just, it's crazy," Mikesell said.

Mikesell also said that she knew the bees were endangered and that's why she didn't want an exterminator to come.

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Bees take over apartment building
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Over 60,000 bees found in Ogden, Utah, apartment complex
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A swarm of removal experts came Monday to safely collect the bees and their hive.

"There's lots of bees here, but we've got one bee that's the critical one, that's her majesty the queen. If I can find the queen, then I've got a live hive. If I can't, then all I've got is a bunch of bees," said Brad Barton, one of the removal experts.

According to the removal experts, 40% of beehives in the United States have been lost in the last year. This one will be relocated to a beekeeping yard where it and all the bees can be safe.

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Over 60,000 bees found in Ogden, Utah, apartment complex
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close up of honey bees flying
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HOMESTEAD, FL - MAY 19: A honeybee is seen at the J & P Apiary and Gentzel's Bees, Honey and Pollination Company on May 19, 2015 in Homestead, Florida. U.S. President Barack Obama's administration announced May 19, that the government would provide money for more bee habitat as well as research into ways to protect bees from disease and pesticides to reduce the honeybee colony losses that have reached alarming rates. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
A bee collects pollen in a sunflower field, Monday, Sept. 1, 2014, near Lawrence, Kan. The 40 acre field planted annually by the Grinter family draws bees and lovers of sunflowers alike during the weeklong late summer blossoming of the flowers. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
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