Dave Chappelle is 'not going to do any jokes' about Rachel Dolezal

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
What's Going on With the Head of Spokane's NAACP?

One of Dave Chappelle's most iconic sketches involves a character named Clayton Bigsby, a blind, black Ku Klux Klan member who thinks he's white. Over the weekend, life, strangely, appeared to imitate art with the case of Rachel Dolezal, a Spokane NAACP president whose parents have accused her of lying about being black when she is, in fact, white. Speaking at his high school's commencement ceremony on Sunday, Chappelle made light of the Rachel controversy. "The world's become ridiculous. There's a white lady posing as a black lady," he commented. "There is not one thing that woman accomplished that she couldn't have done as a white woman. There's no reason! She just needed the braids! I don't know what she was doing."

But backstage, in an interview with the Washington Post, he sang a more sympathetic tune:

"The thing that the media's gotta be real careful about, that they're kind of overlooking, is the emotional context of what she means. There's something that's very nuanced where she's highlighting the difference between personal feeling and what's construct as far as racism is concerned. I don't know what her agenda is, but there's an emotional context for black people when they see her and white people when they see her. There's a lot of feelings that are going to come out behind what's happening with this lady. And she's just a person, no matter how we feel about her."

And as for where Rachel would end up in the Chappelle's Show race draft? "I think black," he told the Post. "We would take her all day, right?" Chappelle also says that, despite his quips on Sunday, all Rachel Dolezal jokes are off limits for him, for now. "I'm probably not going to do any jokes about her or any references to her for awhile 'cause that's going to be a lot of comedians doing a lot," he explained. Just imagine the #AskRachel memes he'd come up with.

11 PHOTOS
NAACP leader outed as white, Rachel Dolezal
See Gallery
Dave Chappelle is 'not going to do any jokes' about Rachel Dolezal
In this image released by NBC News, former NAACP leader Rachel Dolezal appears on the "Today" show set on Tuesday, June 16, 2015, in New York. Dolezal, who resigned as head of a NAACP chapter after her parents said she is white, said Tuesday that she started identifying as black around age 5, when she drew self-portraits with a brown crayon, and "takes exception" to the contention that she tried to deceive people. Asked by Matt Lauer if she is an "an African-American woman," Dolezal said: "I identify as black." (Anthony Quintano/NBC News via AP)
FILE- In this March 2, 2015 file photo, Rachel Dolezal, president of the Spokane chapter of the NAACP, poses for a photo in her Spokane, Wash. home. Dolezal is facing questions about whether she lied about her racial identity, with her family saying she is white but has portrayed herself as black, Friday, June 12, 2015. (Colin Mulvany/The Spokesman-Review via AP, File) 
FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 16, 2015, file photo, Rachel Dolezal, center, Spokane's newly-elected NAACP president, smiles as she meets with Joseph M. King, of King's Consulting, left, and Scott Finnie, director and senior professor of Eastern Washington University's Africana Education Program, before the start of a Black Lives Matter Teach-In on Public Safety and Criminal Justice, at EWU, in Cheney, Wash. Dolezal's family members say she has falsely portrayed herself as black for years. (Tyler Tjomsland/The Spokesman-Review via AP, File)
In this photo taken July 24, 2009, Rachel Dolezal, a leader of the Human Rights Education Institute, stands in front of a mural she painted at the institute's offices in coeur d'alene, Idaho. (AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios)
(Photo via Facebook)
Washington state civil rights advocate Rachel Dolezal is seen in the NBC's "Today" show studios in Manhattan, New York June 16, 2015. Dolezal, who has been accused of falsely claiming she is African-American, said on Tuesday she identifies as black and has been doing so since she was 5 years of age. Dolezal, in an interview on NBC's "Today" television show, said a major shift in her identity came when she was doing human rights work in Idaho and newspaper stories described her as transracial, biracial and black. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Washington state civil rights advocate Rachel Dolezal (R) hugs family member Izaiah Dolezal after her interview on the NBC's "Today" show studios in Manhattan, New York June 16, 2015. Dolezal, who has been accused of falsely claiming she is African-American, said on Tuesday she identifies as black and has been doing so since she was 5 years of age. Dolezal, in an interview on NBC's "Today" television show, said a major shift in her identity came when she was doing human rights work in Idaho and newspaper stories described her as transracial, biracial and black. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Washington state civil rights advocate Rachel Dolezal (C) smiles toward family member Izaiah Dolezal (L) while her son Franklin (R) stands nearby after her interview on the NBC's "Today" show studios in Manhattan, New York June 16, 2015. Dolezal, who has been accused of falsely claiming she is African-American, said on Tuesday she identifies as black and has been doing so since she was 5 years of age. Dolezal, in an interview on NBC's "Today" television show, said a major shift in her identity came when she was doing human rights work in Idaho and newspaper stories described her as transracial, biracial and black. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
People cheer during a protest in front of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) headquarters in Spokane, Washington June 15, 2015. Rachel Dolezal, a civil rights advocate who has been accused of falsely claiming she is black, announced her resignation on Monday as leader of a local branch of the NAACP in Washington state. REUTERS/David Ryder
Gabe Fensler, 14, center, son of demonstration organizer Kitara Johnson and Meggie Mendoza, right, listen to a speaker during a demonstration for local NAACP chapter president Rachel Dolezal to step down Monday, June 15, 2015, in Spokane, Wash. Dolezal resigned as president of the NAACP's Spokane chapter Monday just days after her parents said she is a white woman posing as black. (AP Photo/Young Kwak)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


More on AOL.com:
Jeb Bush's campaign unveils familiar logo ahead of 2106 announcement
Brian Williams' lawyer making NBC News negotiations 'excruciating'
Ben Foster looks just like Lance Armstrong in new trailer for 'The Program'


Read Full Story

People are Reading