U.S. House plans Friday vote on bill key to Pacific trade pact

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Republicans aimed for a vote on Friday to hand President Barack Obama the coveted "fast-track" trade negotiating authority he needs to complete his signature Pacific trade pact after concessions to Democrats appeared to smooth the way forward.

In a memo to fellow Republicans, Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy said the House of Representatives would vote on Thursday on new funding for a program to help workers hurt by trade, before Friday's debate on legislation to speed trade deals through Congress. That tackles a key Democratic concern.

The core legislation - fast-track trade authority for the president - is a central part of Obama's strategic shift toward Asia. It would be accomplished in part through the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that could boost global economic growth and U.S. exports, while setting common standards among emerging and rich nations in one of the world's biggest trade deals.

U.S. Trade Deficit Over Time | InsideGov

The legislation would enhance Obama's negotiating clout by letting Congress set negotiating objectives for trade deals such as the TPP, but preventing lawmakers from making changes to the final agreement.

The Republican-controlled Rules Committee agreed to hold separate votes on the worker aid program and fast-track authority on Friday, a strategy aimed at maximizing votes from both sides of the aisle. Failure of either vote would mean starting again in the House.

If the legislation passes, it would reassure Japan, the second-largest economy, after the United States, involved in the TPP talks. Japanese officials have said fast-track approval is necessary for the creation of the 12-nation TPP, which would encompass 40 percent of the world economy.

"Trade votes are never an easy lift around here, but Republicans are continuing to work, and we're seeing some positive momentum in the right direction," House Speaker John Boehner said after a closed-door meeting with fellow Republican lawmakers.

Exiting the meeting, Representative Paul Ryan, who chairs the powerful House tax committee, said he was "comfortable" that the measure had enough backing in the House, where Republicans have 246 seats to Democrats' 188.

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Tweets on the fast track trade deal
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U.S. House plans Friday vote on bill key to Pacific trade pact
#FreeTrade is vital to the U.S. economy & is an important policy to strengthen our standing on world stage. #TPA would help get us there.
We are united in our fight to #StopFastTrack & protect American jobs. Workers don't need another bad trade deal. https://t.co/RtHarkTfo2
I stand w/@SenatorSessions in asking @POTUS about secret TPP details, and w/@Rep_Hunter asking for TPP transparency. http://t.co/u3bZQzVINe
I am inclined to agree with Sen. Ted Cruz, Sec. Condoleeza Rice, Charles Krauthammer and others on #TPA. http://t.co/HzOIsH8Tl8
Congress shouldn't give up right to review trade agreements that affect American workers' lives #StopFastTrack #AZ07 http://t.co/gjX5UUlTgf
In #TPA, Congress lays out the rules of the road that the President has to follow. http://t.co/WDEcxTn78D
ICYMI: My op-ed explaining my decision to support #TPA: "The President is right on trade" http://t.co/g9aWi6XUqc #TPA4USjobs
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PLAYING CARDS

But some Republicans want concessions from the White House before pledging support for the bill.

"We hold some cards that we previously haven't held with this president, and I think we ought to play them out," said Republican Kevin Cramer, who wants to lift an oil export ban, a move that would benefit his state of North Dakota.

Some Democrats baulked at language that would ensure trade agreements do not lead to changes in U.S. laws on immigration or climate change, addressing pet concerns of some Republicans.

The vote was scheduled after congressional aides said House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi and Boehner had found a way to pay for the $2.7 billion worker support program without cutting healthcare funding for seniors.

A congressional source, who asked not to be identified, said the new funding, worth $700 million, would come from cracking down on illegal tax activities. But because that change would be included in separate legislation, a Democratic aide said members worried it might not pass - a fear that is addressed by having lawmakers vote on that measure first.

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell said the Senate would work "expeditiously" to approve the bill and send it to Obama.

Business groups renewed lobbying efforts for fast-track, with a personalized letter to each lawmaker signed by Business Roundtable Chairman and AT&T Inc (T.N) Chief Executive Officer Randall Stephenson, and Thomas Linebarger, CEO of diesel engine-maker Cummins Inc (CMI.N).

Amid the infighting over the trade bills that could continue right up until Friday's votes, many lawmakers were more focused on Thursday's annual congressional baseball game, a charity fundraiser that will stop work in Congress that night.

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U.S. House plans Friday vote on bill key to Pacific trade pact
House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio walks in Statuary Hall on Capitol Hill in Washington toward the House Chamber, Friday, June 12, 2015. The House sidetracked a high-profile White House-backed trade bill, a humiliating defeat for President Barack Obama inflicted by Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and dozens of rank-and-file lawmakers from his own party. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
US President Barack Obama walks through a hallway after meeting with House Democrats at the US Capitol on June 12, 2015 in Washington, DC. The House blocked a trade bill on June 12 which would have given Obama authority to pursue a sweeping free trade agenda. AFP PHOTO/MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 23: Demonstrators protest against the Trans Pacific Partnership trade agreement outside the Senate office buildings on Capitol Hill June 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Senate passed an important proceedural vote on the trade bill, which would grant President Barack Obama enhanced negotiating powers to complete a major Pacific trade accord, clearing the way for final passage as early as Wednesday. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 23: Demonstrators protest against the Trans Pacific Partnership trade agreement outside the Senate office buildings on Capitol Hill June 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Senate passed an important proceedural vote on the trade bill, which would grant President Barack Obama enhanced negotiating powers to complete a major Pacific trade accord, clearing the way for final passage as early as Wednesday. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 23: Demonstrators protest against the Trans Pacific Partnership trade agreement outside the Senate office buildings on Capitol Hill June 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Senate passed an important proceedural vote on the trade bill, which would grant President Barack Obama enhanced negotiating powers to complete a major Pacific trade accord, clearing the way for final passage as early as Wednesday. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 23: Demonstrators protest against the Trans Pacific Partnership trade agreement outside the Senate office buildings on Capitol Hill June 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Senate passed an important proceedural vote on the trade bill, which would grant President Barack Obama enhanced negotiating powers to complete a major Pacific trade accord, clearing the way for final passage as early as Wednesday. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer of Md., arrives for a meeting with President Barack Obama and other House Democrats on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, June 12, 2015. The president made an 11th-hour appeal to dubious Democrats on Friday in a tense run-up to a House showdown on legislation to strengthen his hand in global trade talks. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
President Barack Obama and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. leave meeting with House Democrats on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, June 12, 2015. The president made an 11th-hour appeal to dubious Democrats on Friday in a tense run-up to a House showdown on legislation to strengthen his hand in global trade talks (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
President Barack Obama walks in the Democratic dugout as he makes a visit to the Congressional baseball game at Nationals Park, on Thursday, June 11, 2015, in Washington (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
In this photo taken June 9, 2015, House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., answers questions during an interview with The Associated Press in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington. First, give presidents the power to strike trade deals. Then overturn President Barack Obama’s health care law, overhaul the tax code and reform welfare. And someday? Figure out whether to run for president. Call it the New Ryan Plan, a map not just to big changes in the nation’s fiscal policy, but to Paul Ryan’s future. It points the ninth-term congressman and chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee away from the presidential campaign trail and into the thicket of policy that he says will set the country on better financial footing. The path likely emerges at a familiar decision point _ whether to run for president _ somewhere down the road. Ryan, 45, says he might decide to take that step, someday. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)
House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 4, 2015. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. said Thursday that President Barack Obama can count on only a small number of Democrats to back his ambitious trade agenda, and Republicans must supply the rest. Boehner said Obama must procure more Democratic support, telling reporters he spoke with Obama on Wednesday, and "he's got some work to do, too." (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi leaves after a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 4, 2015. Pelosi said that President Barack Obama can count on only a small number of Democrats to back his ambitious trade agenda, and Republicans must supply the rest. House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio said Obama must procure more Democratic support, telling reporters he spoke with Obama on Wednesday, and "he's got some work to do, too." (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
FILE - In this May 5, 2015 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell of Ky. walks to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington. Senate leaders said Tuesday that Democrats have enough votes to block action on President Barack Obama's trade initiatives unless the parties can work out disagreements on how to package various bills. Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio, a strong opponent of Obama’s trade agenda, said Democrats have more than enough votes to block action for now. McConnell agreed. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
UNITED STATES - MAY 12: Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., left, and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, arrive for a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center to express support for passage of the Trade Promotion Authority legislation, May 12, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
White House press secretary Josh Earnest speaks during the daily news briefing at the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 12, 2015. Earnest discussed the much-anticipated Senate vote on trade, and other topics. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 12: Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., leave the Senate Democrats' policy luncheon on Tuesday, May 12, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
In this May 8, 2015, photo, President Barack Obama speaks at Nike headquarters in Beaverton, Ore. A much-anticipated Senate vote on trade will pack some suspense Tuesday, but it won’t be the final word, no matter how it turns out. Supporters of President Barack Obama’s trade agenda need 60 votes in the 100-member Senate merely to start a full-blown debate on the legislation. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
White House press secretary Josh Earnest speaks during the daily news briefing at the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 12, 2015. Earnest discussed the much-anticipated Senate vote on trade, and other topics. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
UNITED STATES - MAY 12: Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., right, and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, conduct a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center to express support for passage of the Trade Promotion Authority legislation, May 12, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 21, 2015 before the Senate Finance Committee hearing on fast track authority. Major labor unions and business groups clashed Tuesday over President Barack Obama's bid for "fast track" authority to advance trade deals being negotiated with numerous nations. Trumka told the Senate Finance Committee that the fast track legislation would rob Congress of a meaningful role in shaping trade deals. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka, right, talks with U.S. Chamber of Commerce President Tom Donohue, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 21, 2015, prior to their testifying before the Senate Finance Committee hearing on fast track authority. Major labor unions and business groups clashed Tuesday over President Barack Obama's bid for "fast track" authority to advance trade deals being negotiated with numerous nations. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah gives an opening remark on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 21, 2015, before the committee's hearing on fast track authority. Major labor unions and business groups clashed Tuesday over President Barack Obama's bid for "fast track" authority to advance trade deals being negotiated with numerous nations. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, right, walks into a hearing room on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 21, 2015, with AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka, center, and U.S. Chamber of Commerce President Tom Donohue before the committee's hearing on fast track authority. Major labor unions and business groups clashed Tuesday over President Barack Obama's bid for "fast track" authority to advance trade deals being negotiated with numerous nations. Trumka told the committee that the fast track legislation would rob Congress of a meaningful role in shaping trade deals. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
President Barack Obama, left, walks with Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich., as he makes a visit to the Congressional baseball game at Nationals Park, on Thursday, June 11, 2015, in Washington (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
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(Additional reporting by David Lawder and Susan Cornwell; Editing by Jonathan Oatis andKen Wills)
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