Suicide bomber targets ancient Egyptian temple in Luxor

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Suicide Bombers Target Ancient Egyptian Temple

LUXOR, Egypt (AP) — A suicide bomber blew himself up on Wednesday just steps away from the ancient Egyptian temple of Karnak in Luxor, a southern city visited by millions of tourists every year, security and health officials said. No tourists were hurt in the attack.

Shortly after the explosion, police exchanged fire with and killed two suspected Islamic militants who had arrived at the sprawling, Nile-side temple together with the suicide bomber, the officials said.

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Suicide bomber targets ancient Egyptian temple in Luxor
LUXOR, EGYPT - JUNE 10: Egyptians gather at the site of a suicide car bomb attack near the ancient Karnak Temple in Egypts southern city of Luxor on June 10, 2015. (Photo by Radwan Aboulmagd/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
An Egyptian security official welcomes German tourists at the ruins of the Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egypt, Wednesday, June 10, 2015. A suicide bomber blew himself up on Wednesday just steps away from the ancient Egyptian temple in Luxor, a southern city visited by millions of tourists every year, security and health officials said. No tourists were killed or hurt in the late morning attack. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)
Egyptian security officials stand guard as tourists visit the ruins of the Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egypt, Wednesday, June 10, 2015. A suicide bomber blew himself up on Wednesday just steps away from the ancient Egyptian temple in Luxor, a southern city visited by millions of tourists every year, security and health officials said. No tourists were killed or hurt in the late morning attack. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)
A pool of blood and an abandoned sandal are seen at the site of a suicide bombing, near Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egypt, Wednesday, June 10, 2015. A suicide bomber blew himself up near a major tourist site in Egypt's southern city of Luxor on Wednesday, wounding four people, including two policemen, but no tourists were hurt in the attack outside the Karnak temple. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)
A crowd looks on at the site of a suicide bombing, near Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egypt, Wednesday, June 10, 2015. A suicide bomber blew himself up on Wednesday just steps away from the ancient Egyptian temple in Luxor, a southern city visited by millions of tourists every year, security and health officials said. No tourists were killed or hurt in the late morning attack. (AP Photo)
Egyptian bystanders look at the scene where assailants attempted to carry out a suicide bomb attack on June 10, 2015, in the Karnak temple in Luxor, a town 700 kilometres (435 miles) south of Cairo. Police said one attacker detonated a bomb and two other assailants died in a firefight close to the famed Karnak temple. A source at the interior ministry said no tourists were hurt. AFP PHOTO / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Human remains are seeing covered with a cloth as Egyptian bystanders look at the scene where assailants attempted to carry out a suicide bomb attack on June 10, 2015, in the Karnak temple in Luxor, a town 700 kilometres (435 miles) south of Cairo. Police said one attacker detonated a bomb and two other assailants died in a firefight close to the famed Karnak temple. A source at the interior ministry said no tourists were hurt. AFP PHOTO / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Egyptian security officials stand guard as tourists visit the ruins of the Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egypt, Wednesday, June 10, 2015. A suicide bomber blew himself up on Wednesday just steps away from the ancient Egyptian temple in Luxor, a southern city visited by millions of tourists every year, security and health officials said. No tourists were killed or hurt in the late morning attack. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)
In this still image taken from video, security personnel and spectators gather at the scene of a suicide bombing just steps away from the ancient Egyptian temple of Karnak in the southern city of Luxor, Egypt, visited by millions of tourists every year, Wednesday, June 10, 2015. Shortly after the explosion, police exchanged fire with and killed two suspected Islamic militants who had arrived at the sprawling, Nile-side temple together with the suicide bomber, security and health officials said. (AP Photo)
A tourist visits the Temple of Karnak to watch the winter solstice at sunrise in the southern Egyptian city of Luxor on December 21, 2013. The central sector of the site which takes up the largest amount of space, is dedicated to the Egyptian god Amun, who became prominent as the greatest of the gods. AFP PHOTO / KHALED DESOUKI (Photo credit should read KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on December 21, 2013, shows the Temple of Karnak, in the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. The 2011 revolution that toppled dictator Hosni Mubarak dealt a severe blow to the country's tourist industry, once a mainstay of Egypt's economy. AFP PHOTO / KHALED DESOUKI (Photo credit should read KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images)
In this Sunday, Nov. 30, 2014, file photo a tourist has her picture taken at the ruins of the Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egypt. Egyptian officials say a suicide bomber has blown himself up at the ancient temple of Karnak in Luxor, a southern city frequented by millions of foreign and Egyptian tourists every year. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File)
A tourist looks at the ruins of the Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 30, 2014. Foreign tourism, a major part of Egypt's economy, has been hurt during years of turmoil following the 2011 revolt that saw autocrat Hosni Mubarak step down. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)
A tourist takes picture at the ruins of the Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 30, 2014. Foreign tourism, a major part of Egypt's economy, has been hurt during years of turmoil following the 2011 revolt that saw autocrat Hosni Mubarak step down. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)
FILE - In this Sunday, Nov. 30, 2014, file photo tourists look out at the ruins of the Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egypt. Egyptian officials say a suicide bomber has blown himself up at the ancient temple of Karnak in Luxor, a southern city frequented by millions of foreign and Egyptian tourists every year. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File)
An Egyptian tourist guide waits tourists in at the ruins of the Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 30, 2014. Foreign tourism, a major part of Egypt's economy, has been hurt during years of turmoil following the 2011 revolt that saw autocrat Hosni Mubarak step down. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 7, file photo, a tourist points out a hieroglyphic on a column in the Hypostyle Hall at the Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egypt. Egyptian officials say a suicide bomber has blown himself up at the ancient temple of Karnak in Luxor, a southern city frequented by millions of foreign and Egyptian tourists every year. (AP Photo/Jon Gambrell, File)
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Four people, including two policemen, were wounded in the exchange, according to the Health Ministry in Cairo.

The governor of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor, Mohammed Sayed Badr, said no tourists were hurt in the bombing outside the famed temple. Speaking to The Associated Press over the phone, he said the attack was "an attempt to break into the temple of Karnak."

"They didn't make it in," he added of the attackers.

Wednesday's attack was the second this month by suspected Islamic militants at or near a major tourist attraction. On June 3, gunmen on a speeding motorcycle opened fire outside the famed Giza Pyramids on the outskirts of Cairo, killing two police officers.

Badr also offered a slightly different version of how the attack unfolded. He said three men carrying bags got out of a car in the temple's parking lot, which immediately made the police suspicious and policemen ordered them to stop.

One of the three then began running, so the police fired at him and an explosive belt he was wearing blew up. A second man had a gun and started shooting at the police before he was shot and killed. The third attacker was wounded in the shootout and arrested by an undercover policeman.

Badr said the nationalities of the three men have yet to be determined. Badr's account and that of the security officials could not immediately be reconciled, but that is common in the immediate aftermath of major attacks.

There were only a handful of tourists and Egyptians inside the temple at the time of the late morning attack, added the security officials, speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media.

Wednesday's attack was the first to target world-famous attractions in Luxor since November 1997, when Islamic militants opened fire on tourists at the city's 3,400-year-old Hatshepsut Temple on the west bank of the Nile, killing 58.

Tourism is the lifeblood of Luxor, home to some of Egypt's most famous ancient temples and pharaonic tombs, including that of King Tutankhamun. The city has been hit hard by a downturn in foreign visitors during the years of unrest since Egypt's 2011 uprising.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for Wednesday's attack, but it bore the hallmarks of Islamic militants who have been battling security forces in the strategic Sinai Peninsula for years. Extremists in Sinai have targeted tourism sites to try to deny the government a key source of revenue.

Last year, the Sinai-based insurgent group Ansar Beit al-Maqdis pledged allegiance to the Islamic State group, which has destroyed famed archaeological sites in Syria and Iraq, viewing them as idolatrous.

The campaign of violence in Sinai accelerated and spread to other parts of Egypt following the 2013 military overthrow of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi. The militants say the attacks are in revenge for a massive crackdown on Islamists underway in Egypt.

The attack on the Luxor temple, which sits on the east bank of the Nile, comes as Egypt tries to rehabilitate its vital tourism industry, which accounted for as much as 20 percent of foreign currency revenues before its 2011 revolt that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak and later years of turmoil.

From a high of 14.7 million tourists in 2010, Egypt has had an average of around 9 million a year since then, though officials say tourists slowly are coming back. Government officials say the tourism industry saw revenues jump to $4 billion in the first half of this year, compared to $1.9 billion in the same period last year.

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Associated Press writers Maggie Michael and Sarah El Deeb contributed to this report from Cairo.

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